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Full text of "The Strand Magazine: An Illustrated Monthly"

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THE STRAND MAGAZINE 

July, 1898, to December, 1898 



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THE 



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EDITED BY 



GEORGE NEWNES 



Vol. XVI. 

JULY TO DECEMBER 



Xonton : 

GEORGE NEWNES, LTD., 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, & 12, SOUTHAMPTON STKEET. 

AND EXETER STREET, STRAND 



1898 



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Vol. 



The Strand Magazine. 



JULY, 1898, 



No. 91, 



7 he Brotherhood of the Seven Kings. 

By L. T. Meade and Robert Eustace. 
VII. —THE IRON CIRCLET. 




A DAMP2 had left London, and 
my first wild hope was that 
she might not return ; but this 
was quickly doomed to dis- 
appointment, For two months 
after the events related in the 
last story, as I was walking down Welbeck 

Street, I noticed that the blinds in her house 

were up, that there were fresh curtains to the 

windows, and that the place bore all the 

usual marks of habitation. With a sinking 

heart I was just commenting on this 

fact when I saw the hall door 

open, and a slender, dark- 

.eyed young woman run down 

the steps. She glanced at me, 

raised her brows very slightly 

as if she recognised me, half 

paused as if about to speak, 

then changed her mind and 

walked rapidly just a few paces 

in front of me down the street. 

I had certainly never seen her 

before, and pitying her as in all 

probability one of Madame's 

victims, went on my own way. 
In the course of the same 

afternoon I visited Defrayer at 

his office, A glance at his face 

showed me that he had some- 
thing to say. He drew me 

aside with a certain eagerness, 

and began to speak. 

* " I really believe," he cried, 

"that the tide has turned at last. 

Madame is so emboldened by 

her success that she is certain to 

do something foolish." 

"She is back in town," I 

interrupted. " I passed her house 

this morning and " 

" She returned about a fort- 
night ago," interrupted Dufrayer. 

" Now, listen, Head, I have 

something to tell you. You 

know that for a long time 

Tyler's agents have been follow- 
ing Mme, Koluchy ? It was only 

Vol- xvl-1 



yesterday morning that Tyler drew my atten- 
tion to a matter which looks uncommonly 
suspicious. But read this advertisement for 
yourself." 

As he spoke, Dufrayer handed me the 
Tim es of & week back. Under the heading 
"Situations Vacant," he pointed to the 
following words :- — 

WANTED a first-rale Bacteriologist to advise 
on a matter of a very private nature* Hand- 
some remuneration to anyone possessing l he necessary 
knowledge. Apply, in strict privacy, by letter only 
to K.K., ^Q/ftmrs Office, E,C. 




>ogle 



rt VQUttG WOMAN - 



VERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



I put the paper down. 

" What is there suspicious about that ? " I 
asked. 

41 At first sight one would think nothing," 
was the answer ; " but Tyler is so alert that 
not a single thing escapes him now. The 
' K.K.' first aroused his sense of inquiry." 

II Katherine Koluchy ! " I cried. " Surely, 
if this were an advertisement put in by 
Madame, she would not, knowing how she is 
wanted, use her own initials ? " 

"It seems scarcely likely," he answered, 
"but I will tell you exactly what has happened. 
On seeing the advertisement Tyler at once 
posted a man in the Times advertisement 
office, explaining his business to the clerks. 
Tyler's man was instructed how to proceed. 
About eleven o'clock on the morning after 
the advertisement was first published a person 
arrived, received two letters, and went away. 
Tyler's clerk immediately followed this man, 
who went straight to Mme. Koluchy's house. 
It was a lucky shot of Tyler's, and they are 
following up the scent closely. He has 
further discovered that they have engaged no 
less a person than the well-known bacteri- 
ologist, James Lockhart, to undertake this 
very mysterious business. His private 
laboratory is in Devonshire Street. The 
question now arises : What steps are we to 
take?" 

" I see that you have an idea," I replied. 

" Well, I have ; or, rather, it is Tyler's — he 
suggests a bold step. He thinks that you 
and 1 ought to call on Lockhart. There is 
no question with regard to his position and 
knowledge. He has done more original 
work during the last two years in bacteriology 
than anyone else in the country, and if this 
terrible Brotherhood should worm some secret 
out of him on a plausible pretext, they may 
use it to deadly effect, making him the 
unsuspectirig agent of a terrible crime. Know- 
ing all that we do, Head, I think we are bound 
to see him." 

I thought over Dufrayer's suggestion. 

41 1 am puzzled to know what to say," was 
my reply. 44 Lockhart may not like our inter- 
fering." 

44 Very possibly ; but, nevertheless, the duty 
of warning him remains the same." 

44 If you feel so, Dufrayer, 1 have no doubt 
you are right," I said. 4t When will you 
go to see Lockhart ? I shall, of course, be 
willing to accompany you." 

44 1 cannot look him up to-day, for I am 
unfortunately busy at the courts to the last 
moment ; but I suggest that you and I go to 
bis hoyse to-morrow morning at ten." 

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44 Very well," I answered ; 44 1 will meet 
you outside his door at that hour." 

A few minutes later I left Dufrayer. 
Absorbed in anxious thought, I presently 
found myself in Piccadilly, and then in Bond 
Street. I walked on slowly — my thoughts 
were so anxious that they seemed to impede 
my movements. 

Madame had returned. Once again she 
was at work on some hideous machination. 
Once again Dufrayer and I held our lives in 
our hands. Knowing the woman as I did, I 
could scarcely agree with Dufrayer that, 
emboldened by success, she was becoming 
less cautious. Never yet was she known to 
allow her vigilance to sleep, and not even in 
the hour of victory would it fail her. On the 
face of it, this very open advertisement looked 
queer, but surely there was more behind. 
Yes, we must warn Lockhart. He would 
resent our interfering, but what matter ? He 
was a strong man in every sense of the word, 
and I rather wondered at Madame's selecting 
him to do her deadly work. I had seen him 
more than once during the Inst couple of 
years. His remarkable genius and the 
brilliancy of some of his lectures before the 
Royal Society returned vividly to my 
memory. 

The hour was now between four and five. 
I suddenly remembered that I had promised 
to meet a man in some tea-rooms which had 
lately been opened in Bond Street. I found 
the right place, and walked down a long, 
narrow passage, which opened into a small 
courtyard surrounded by coffee and tea rooms 
of different descriptions. The seclusion and 
unexpected quiet of the place were refreshing ; 
the soft notes of distant music took my steps 
upstairs to the first floor, and the next instant 
I had entered a tea-room, as still and peaceful 
as if London were miles away. Some 
girls, tastefully dressed and looking like 
ladies, were waiting on the visitors. I seated 
myself at a small table and waited for my 
friend. I looked at my watch — he was late. 
I resolved to wait for him for a few moments, 
but before many had passed, one of the 
young waitresses approached me with a tele- 
gram, asking if my name was Head. I 
replied in the affirmative, and tore it open. 
It was from my friend. He had suddenly been 
called out of town, and could not keep his 
appointment. I ordered tea for myself, and 
leaning back in my chair looked around me. 
The room was tastefully decorated with a 
certain aiming after simplicity, which produced 
a most inviting effect. My tea was brought 
on a small tray, and at the same time a 
Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE SEVEN KINGS. 



girl, very quietly dressed, took the place 
opposite to mine. My first glance caused 
me to look at her again. She was the dark- 
eyed girl whom I had seen that morning 
coming down Mme, Koluchy's steps, I 
observed that her eyes, larger than those of 
most English women 3 wore a strained expres- 
sion ; otherwise she was fresh and young- 
looking. 

I poured out a cup of tea and was just 
raising it to my lips, when she suddenly bent 
forward. 




* l SME SUDDENLY BENT FOHWABD,* 1 

" I am addressing Mr. Norman Head, am 
I not?" she said, in a low, hurried voice. 
I bowed coldly in acknowledgment 
"Forgive me," .she said, again* "I know 
that you are very much surprised at my 
addressing you, but I must tell you the 
simple truth. I meant to speak to you 
this morning outside Mme. Koluchy's 
house, but I could not summon courage. I 
happened to be in Bond Street just now, and 



saw you passing. You entered here, and 1 
followed you. I know I have Liken a very 
bold step, but I cannot rest until I tell you 
something : it Is not a message of any sort, 
but it is a word of warning," 

I made an impatient exclamation. 
t4 If you have anything to say I must, of 
course^ listen," 1 replied ; li but, remember, 
you are a total stranger to me." 

"I will tell you my name," she said, 
eagerly. " Valentia Ward. I am Mr. Lock- 
hart's secretary. You know Mr. Lock hart, 
of 205, Devon shire Street, 
do you not ? " 

" By name, well You 
allude to the great bacterio- 
logist ? n 

"Yes," she answered; 
" I have been his secretary 
for over a year. I work 
with him every morning in 
his laboratory. It is about 
him, and also about you, 
Mr- Head, that I want to 
speak." 

u Well , say what you have 
to say as quickly as pos- 
sible/' I replied. 

" I will do so. Bend 
forward a little, so that 
others may not overhear/' 

She poured herself out a 
cup of tea as she uttered 
the last words. Her hand 
shook slightly. It was a 
delicate and very small 
white hand, the blue veins 
showing under the skin. 

" I happen to know," 
she continued, "no matter 
how or why, that you, Mr. 
Head, and a certain Mr. 
Dufrayer, a well - known 
criminal solicitor, intend to 
follow up an advertisement 
which appeared in the 
Times of this day week. 
The advertisement was to 
the effect that a first-rate 
bacteriologist was required to advise on a 
matter of a private nature. Mr. Dufrayer 
has learned, no matter how, that Mr. James 
Lockhart, of 205, Devonshire Street, has been 
appointed to undertake the work. It is your 
intention, and also Mr. Dufrayer's, to call 
upon him in order to warn him with regard 
to some hidden danger. Am I not right ? " 

" You must forgive me, but I cannot reply 
to your questioqtfhal from 

VERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE, 



She smiled very faintly. 

** You are a wise man to guard your 
lips, but your face is my answer," she 
said. "Now I will tell you why I have 
ventured to speak to you- I want you 
to give up your intention of calling on Mr. 
Lock hart." 

"And by what right do you, a complete 
stranger, interfere with my movements?" 

" By the right of my superior knowledge," 
she answered, at once* "My reasons I 
cannot explain, but they are of the gravest 
character. You and your friend will implicate 
yourselves most seriously if you do what you 
intend to do. You will run into danger if 
you meddle in this matter. In giving you 
this warning I risk much myself, and I 
earnestly beseech of you to believe me and 
to attend to my words. Do not see Mr, 
Loekhart. I>et the advertisement alone, 
By so doing you will circumvent — you will 

circumvent " her lips trembled, fire shone 

in her big eyes, she rose to her feet. 

" I can do no more/' she said. " If you 
fail to understand me I am sorry, but I have 
at least performed a very painful and 
netessary duty." 

She drew down her veil, went to a little 
table near the door, where an accountant sat, 
paid for her tea, and left the room. 

I sat on where 
she had left me, 
feeling puzzled 
and shaken. The 
girl's face bore 
the impress of 
truth, and yet it 
seemed hard not 
to believe that 
she was one 
of Madame's 
agents. Had I 
not actually seen 
her coming down 
the steps of 
Madame*! house? 
She seemed 
troubled when 
she spoke. 
When she 
pleaded with me, 
her voice shook 
with the extreme 
and passionate 
eagerness of her 
words. But all 
these signs might 
only be put on 
in order to pre- 




' HH EXTENDED HIS IIAMD TO ME, 

byGooQie 



vent an interference, which Madame, from 
long experience, had learned to dread. 

When I met Dufrayer on the following 
morning outside lxjckhart's house, I took his 
arm, and walked with him for a moment 
or two up and down the street, I then 
related briefly the incident of the day 
before. He listened to my words with 
marked attention. 

" What do you think? " I said> when I had 
concluded. 

u That beyond doubt the girl has been 
employed to warn you," was his reply. 
" Lock hart's danger is even greater than I 
was at first inclined to suspect. If he is not 
very careful he will find himself in a hornet's 
nest. Yes, we must warn him immediately. 
It is past ten— let us ring the bell; he will 
probably be at home." 

In reply to our summons, we were told that 
Mr. Loekhart was within, and were shown at 
once into a private room next to his laboratory. 
He joined us almost immediately. His 
appearance was already well known to me, but 
when he entered the room I was struck once 
again by his remarkable personality. He 
was a tall and very heavily-built man, stand- 
ing quite six feet, with broad shoulders and 
a jovial red face, as unlike the typical 
scientist as man could be. His manner 

was bluff and 
hearty, and he 
had a merry 
smile, suggestive 
more of a 
country squire 
than of one who 
spent most of his 
time over culture 
plates. 

"What can I 
do for you, sir ? " 
he asked, geni- 
ally, extending 
his hand to me. 
u Your name, 
Mr. Head, is not 
unfamiliar to me; 
and if I remem- 
ber aright, we 
were once an- 
tagonists in print 
in a discussion 
on Nitrifying 
Bacteria. I am 
afraid in the end 
I hnd to yield 
to your superior 
knowledge, but 



^£^; 



Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE SEVEN KINGS. 



I should like now to show you a little thing 
which may change your views." 

" Thank you," I answered, " but I have 
not called to discuss your work. May I 
introduce my friend, Mr. Dufrayer? He 
and I have come here this morning on a 
matter which we believe to be of the utmost 
importance. It is of a strictly private nature, 
and when you have heard what we have both 
got to say, you will, I am sure, pardon what 
must seem an unwarrantable espionage" 

He raised his eyebrows, and looked from 
Dufrayer to me in some astonishment 

I drew a copy of the Times from my 
pocket and pointed to the advertisement. 
As I did so I noticed for the first time that 
the door between this room and the next was 
open, and at the same instant the distinct 
noise of breaking glass came to my ears. 

" Pardon me a moment," said Lockhart ; 
" my secretary is in the next room, and you 
would rather that no one overheard us. I 
will just go to her, and ask her to do some 
work in my study." 

Still retaining the copy of the Times in his 
hand, he entered a large laboratory, where 
doubtless his own important discoveries were 
made. 

" Ah! Miss Ward," he exclaimed, "so you 
have broken that culture tube. Well, never 
mind now ; don't wait to pick up the fragments, 
I am particularly engaged. There are letters 
which I want you to copy in my study; you 
can go there until I send for you." 

The light steps of a young woman were 
heard leaving the room ; a door was opened 
at the further end and closed again softly. 
Lockhart returned to us. 

" I am fortunate, "he said, "in havingsecured 
as my secretary a most intelligent and clever 
girl, one in a thousand. At one time she 
thought of embracing the medical profession, 
and has studied bacteriology a little herself; 
but what possessed her to break a valuable 
culture tube now, is more than I can under- 
stand. Poor girl, she was quite white and 
trembling when I went into the room, and 
yet I am never harsh to her. Her name is 
Valentia Ward, a pretty creature, and a better 
secretary than any man I have ever come 
across. But there, gentlemen, you must 
pardon my alluding to my own private 
affairs. The loss of that culture tube has 
upset me a trifle, but I shall soon put matters 
right, and Miss Ward need not have looked 
so stricken. Now let us attend to business. 
You speak of an advertisement in this paper 
— where is it ? Is it to-day's edition ?" 

" No, the edition of a week back," I 

Digitized by LjOOQ IC 



replied. " I have reason to know, Mr. Lock- 
hart, that you have answered this advertise- 
ment. Pray glance your eye over it again — 
it is in your own interests that my friend and 
I have come here to-day." 

"I fail to understand," said Lockhart, 
a trifle coldly. 

" I will gladly explain*" I said. " We 
have the strongest reasons for suspecting that 
these words were inserted by a well-known 
lady doctor called Mme. Koluchy." 

"Still, I do not perceive your meaning," 
he replied. " Even granted that such is the 
case, may I ask what business this is of 
yours ? " 

" You certainly may. Our business is to 
warn you against any dealings with that 
woman." 

" Indeed ! But the lady in question is 
well known, and her scientific attainments are 
respected by every scientist in the kingdom. 
I think we must either close our present 
interview, or I must beg of you to give me a 
further explanation." 

" As honourable men we can speak quite 
plainly," I replied. " However impossible it 
may seem to you, I am now prepared to tell 
you that Mme. Koluchy is the head of a gang, 
or secret society, whose head-quarters are at 
present in London. This society is perpetrat- 
ing some of the most terrible crimes the 
century has known. I could mention half-a- 
dozen which would be familiar to you. Up 
till now Madame has eluded justice with a 
most remarkable ingenuity, but she cannot 
do so much longer. All my friend and I 
beg of you is to have nothing to do with her, 
and, beyond all other things, not to put into 
her hands or into the hands of any of her 
confederates one or more of the great secrets 
of bacteriology. You know as well as I do 
how omnipotent such powers would be in 
the hands of the unscrupulous." 

While I was speaking Lockhart's red face 
became troubled. He wrinkled his forehead 
and knit his brows. 

" What you have told me sounds almost 
incredible," he said, at last. "I suppose I 
ought to be obliged to you, but I scarcely 
know that I am. You have upset my con- 
fidence, and sown doubt where I must frankly 
say I had absolute faith. Since, however, 
you have spoken to me so frankly, it is but 
fair that I should tell you what I know of 
this matter. It is true that I did see that 
advertisement in the Times, and replied to it. 
Famous bacteriologist as I doubtless am, I 
am also a poor man. Pure science, as you 
know, Mr* Head, brings riches to none. I 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



8 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



answered the advertisement, and received 
almost immediately afterwards a letter from 
Mme. Koluchy asking me to call upon her 
at her house in Welbeck Street She 
received me in her consulting-room, and put 
a few questio is to me. I found her frank and 
agreeable, and there was nothing in the least 
sinister, either in her manner or in the 
disclosures which she was obliged to make 
to me. She soon perceived that I was 
admirably adapted to carry out her require- 
ments, said that she would give me the work 
if I cared to undertake it, and on my 
promising to da so proceeded at once to 
business. I cannot divulge the nature of the 
research which I am about to make on her 
behalf, as I am under a solemn vow not to 
do so, but I can at least assure you that it is 
a perfectly honourable matter, and the pay — 
well, the pay is so good that I cannot afford 
to lose it Mme. Koluchy is prepared to 
give me what may mean a small fortune. 
But I will tell you this, Mr. Head: if I find 
out that what you have just said is really the 
case, and I see the smallest likelihood of my 
information being used for dishonourable 
purposes, I shall withdraw." 

" You cannot do more," I answered, " and 
I am much obliged to you for listening to 
us so patiently." 

44 I respect the honesty of your purpose," 
he said. 

44 May I also beg that you will regard what 
I have just said as strictly confidential ? " 

The ghost of a smile flitted across his face; 
it passed almost immediately. 

44 1 will," he replied. 

44 It seems hard to press you still further," 

' said Dufrayer, 44 but, short of abusing any 

confidence you may have made with Mme. 

Koluchy, would it be possible for you to 

keep us posted in what goes on ? " 

44 1 think I may promise that also, and, as 
a preliminary, I may as well say that I expect 
to leave town at a moment's notice on this 
very business. I do not know where I am 
going, for I have not yet received full instruc- 
tions. It occurs to me, that if matters are 
really as serious as you think them to be, it 
would be as well for me to go, in order to 
make Mme. Koluchy show her hand." 

44 Yes," replied Dufrayer, "you are right 
there, Mr. Lockhart The interests involved 
are so enormous that we shall only be able 
to defeat our enemies on their own ground ; 
but if you happen to be going to ipfcnely 
part of the country, do not, I beg of you, go 
unarmed, and also communicate freely with 
Mr. Head or myself. You need have no 

Digitized by GoOQle 



fear, as our agents and detectives will be 
ready and alert, and will - follow you any- 
where." 

Again that almost imperceptible smile 
passed across his face. Certainly, to look at 
him, he did not appear to be a man to want 
much protection in case of a personal 
encounter. His huge frame towered above 
Dufrayer and myself as he rose and con- 
ducted us to the door. 

44 Well," said Dufrayer, when we got out- 
side, 44 what do you think of it all ? My own 
opinion is," he added, without waiting for me 
to speak, 44 that we shall have them this time. 
Madame has not conducted this matter with 
half of her usual acumen. Her successes have 
rendered her thoroughly contemptuous of us. 
Depend upon it, she will soon learn her 
lesson." 

44 And what about Miss Valentia Ward ? " 
I cried. 44 From I^ockhart's manner he seems 
to place absolute trust in her, and yet either 
there is grave mischief ahead, of which we 
know nothing, or the girl is in Madame's pay." 

44 1 have not the slightest doubt which way 
the balance lies," said Dufrayer ; 44 but 
Lockhart has been warned by us, and he is 
quite capable of looking after himself. We 
could not well betray Miss Ward. Having 
neglected her advice, we show her very plainly 
that we do not believe the cock-and-bull 
story she tried to tempt you with." 

44 And yet the girl looked as if she spoke 
the truth," I answered. 

44 Ah, Head, you were always influenced 
by a pretty face," said Dufrayer. 44 Had 
Miss Ward been old and wrinkled, you would 
have treated her cool attempt to impose upon 
you with the harshness it deserves." 

44 She was agitated and upset to-day, at 
any rate," I replied. 44 Beyond doubt, it was 
nervousness at suddenly hearing our voices 
which caused her to break that culture tube." 

Dufrayer said nothing further, and I went 
to my own house. 

All during the day which followed I could 
not get either Lockhart or his secretary out 
of my head, and more than once I congratu- 
lated myself upon having acted so promptly 
on Dufrayer's advice. Having opened 
Lockhart's eyes, it was scarcely likely that he 
would be hoodwinked now ; and if Madame 
herself did not fall into our hands, in all 
probability some of her gang would. 

Between four and five on the afternoon of 
that same day, to my great astonishment, 
Lockhart was shown into my laboratory. 
His fat face was redder than ever, and he 
was panting with excitement 



I a I I I _' I 1 1 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE SEVEN KINGS. 



\ 



u Ah ! " he said, when he saw me, " I hope 
I am in time. Get ready quickly, Mr. Head/' 
He took out his handkerchief and began to 
mop his face. 

**I have suddenly received orders to go 
down from Waterloo by the 5.10 to Lyming- 
ton, in Hampshire, and to bring three broth 
cultures of a certain bacillus with me* I am 
to be met at Lymington by a boat Beyond 
this I know nothing. During the day which 
has passed I have thought more than once 
of what you have told me, and I will confess 
that my suspicions are aroused. On receiving 
this sudden summons, it occurred to me that 
if you were to accompany me we could see 
for ourselves what the matter really means, 
and perhaps be able to frustrate Madame '5 
plans. Can you manage to come ? If so, 
we have not a single moment to lose — my 

cab is waiting at the door," 

" By Jove t this looks really like business," 

I said ; " but I ought to let Dufrayer know." 
" You have no time to do so now. We 

can barely manage to get the train by going 

straight off. If we reach Waterloo 

in time, we can send your friend 

a telegram' from there," 

" True," I answered ; ** I will 

go with you at once." 

Lockhart glanced impatiently 

at his watch. "It is more than 

half-past four/' he said; "it will 

be a gallop to the station as it is." 

I considered for a moment 
There was no time to pack any- 
thing, and I dared not lose what 
might be the opportunity that I 
had so longed to meet I ran 
upstairs, put on a Norfolk suit 
and travelling cap, and thrust a 
revolver into my pocket I then 
joined my companion, 

"Is there any chance of your 
being watched to see if you come 
down alone?" I said, as our cab 
dashed along the Marylebone 
Road, 

Lockhart turned and stared at 
me without replying, 

"I have not thought of that," 
he said, at last 

II It is a possible contingency," 
I answered, " I know the wari- 
ness of my enemy. Had we not 
better go down to Lymington in 
separate carriages ? When we get 
there it will be dark, and we can 
start off together without being 
observed," 

r ^" aiiud by Google 



^That would he a good plan/' he replied 
11 1 will go third-class, you can go first" 

The clock pointed to eight minutes past 
five as we dashed up the incline to Waterloo. 
We rushed for our tickets, and just as the 
doors were being closed were running up the 
platform towards the train. As I flew past 
the third-class compartments to my own 
more luxurious carriage, I fancied I saw in 
one, marked " Ladies only," a face pressed 
against the window and watching me. It 
was the face of a woman with dark eyes. It 
appeared for a flash, and then disappeared 
behind a curtain* My heart sank with 
sick apprehension. If Valentia Ward were 
indeed following us to Lymington, there 
was no doubt whatever that she was one 
of Madame's accomplices. She knew that I 
had met Lockhart contrary to her warning, 
and was now> doubtless, hurrying to Yarmouth 
to reveal the truth to Madame. 

The train sped on, and my thoughts con- 
tinued to be both busy and anxious. The 
face with its dark eyes pursued me, turn 




>p 



k IT WAS THE PACE OF A WOMAN, 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



10 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE, 



where I would. I now regretted that a 
certain sense of honour had forbade my 
telling Lockhart of my suspicions that morn- 
ing, and I determined to do so when we 
reached Lymington, 

There was no change at Bracken hurst, and 
at half-past eight we drew up at Lymington 
Pier. Pulling the collar of my Norfolk jacket 
well up, and drawing down my cap over my 
eyes, I stepped out, Lockhart passed me, 
pushed slightly against me in doing so, and 
slipped a note into my hand I glanced at 
this at once. 

"Go in the boat to Yarmouth, and then 
on to Freshwater, I am coming over in a 
private boat," 
he wrote. 

I looked up 
quickly. Already 
he was lost in 
the throng of 
passengers who 
had left the 
train. I had no 
opportunity to ' 
give him any 
warning ; there 
was nothing for 
it but to obey 
his directions- 
take a ticket to 
Yarmouth and 
hasten on 
board. In a few 
moments I 
found myself 
steaming down 
the river and 
out into the 
Solent. The 
sun had set, and 
the moon would 
not rise for an 
hour or two. I 
Stood on dft:k 
looking back at 
the lights of 
Lymington as 
they were re- 
flected in the 
water. Suddenly 
I felt someone 

touch me. I looked round, and Miss Ward 
was by my side. 

"You have disregarded my advice," she 
said; "you are in great danger. Don't land 
at Yarmouth. Take the return boat to 
Symington." 

Her voice was so earnest, and there was 




MISS WARD WAS RV MY SIPE. 



by Google 



such a ring of real distress in it T that, try as I 
would, I could scarcely treat her with the 
harshness which I thought her conduct 
deserved- 

"You are a woman," I began, " but — — " 
"Oh, I know all that you think of me," 
she answered, "but the risk is too terrible, 
and my duty too plain, for any harsh judg- 
ment of yours to influence me. Go back, go 
back while there is time." 

" I cannot understand you," I said 
" You warn me of some vague danger, and 
yet you allow Lockhart, the man who employs 
you, to run into what, according to your own 
showing, is a trap for his destruction. How 

can I respect 
you or believe 
your words when 
you act in such 
a manner? " 

" I dare not 
tell you the 
whole truth," 
she answered. 
"I wish I had 
courage, but it 
means too much. 
Mr Lockhart is 
in no danger ; 
you are. Won't 
you go back — 
won't you be 
guided by me?" 
"No," I said; 
" where he goes, 
I will go; his 
danger is mine 
also. Miss Ward, 
you are impli- 
cating yourself 
in the queerest 
way ; you are 
showing me all 
too plainly that 
you are on the 

side of " 

" You think 

that I am Mme. 

K o 1 u c h y ' s 

agent ? M she 

a nswered. 

"Well, there is 

only one way of saving you ! I tried 

yesterday to do what I could ; you would 

not be warned, When I heard your voice, 

and that of your friend, in Mr, Lockhart's 

dining-room this morning, my agitation 

was so great that I almost betrayed myself. 

On your behalf I have listened, and watched. 

Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE SEVEN KINGS. 



ii 



and acted the spy all day. You can scarcely 
realize what my awful position is. But, if 
you will not yield to my entreaties, I must 
tell you everything." 

Just then, a friend whom I happened to 
know, and who lived at Yarmouth, came up, 
uttered an exclamation of astonishment, and 
drew me aside. He invited me to spend the 
night with him, but knowing that Lockhart 
expected me at Freshwater, I declined his 
invitation. I was glad of the interruption, 
and kept by his side until we reached the 
pier at Yarmouth. I then looked round 
for Miss Ward, but she had disappeared. 

I now hoped that I had escaped her 
altogether. I took a carriage and drove 
to the hotel at Freshwater, where I in- 
tended staying until Lockhart communi- 
cated with me. I knew the place well, 
having spent many a summer holiday 
there in my young days. The hotel was 
nearly empty, the season not having yet 
begun, and I found myself the only occupant 
of the coffee-room. I ordered a hasty meal, 
and was just beginning to eat when a lady 
dressed in black entered the room and sat 
down at a distant table. A waiter came up 
and asked if she wanted anything. She 
ordered a cup of coffee, which was presently 
brought to her. I do not think she touched 
it. I saw her slowly stirring it with her tea- 
spoon; she raised her eyes and encountered 
mine. She was Miss Ward. I perceived 
she had followed me. My dinner became 
instantly distasteful. I took up a paper 
and pretended to read. In a few moments 
a waiter brought me a note. I tore it open. 
It ran as follows : — 

" 1 am staying here at a big house called 
the Towers, where the work is to be done. 
Come up path by cliff towards the golf links. 
Will meet you there. We can talk alone and 
arrange our plans. This is a matter of life 
and deathg" 

I thrust the note into my coat-pocket and, 
raising my eyes, saw that Miss Ward had left 
her seat and come up to my table. 

"You are to meet Mr. Lockhart on the 
path by the cliff towards the golf links ? " she 
said, in an interrogative voice. 

I made no reply. 

41 If you go I shall go also," she continued. 
" By so doing I put myself into the most 
deadly peril. Will not the thought of my 
danger influence you ? " 

"It is not necessary for you to go, and 
it is for me," I replied. " Miss Ward, 
I cannot understand your motive, nor 
why you persist in harassing me as you are 



doing, but I can only act on my own judg- 
ment and as I think best. Leave me now to 
my fate, whatever it is. I have my work to 
do and must do it." 

" Then it will be as I said," she answered. 
" You are imperilling your life and mine, but 
I have spoken — I can add no more." 

She left the room, closing the door after 
her. 

Making a great effort, I tried to banish her 
words and her strange persistency from my 
mind. I put on my hat and started off. I 
went down the lawn, crossed the little front 
parade, and began to ascend the pathway. I 
walked on for about half a mile, along the 
edge of the cliff, looking to right and left for 
Lockhart My mind was torn with conflict- 
ing thoughts. Should I tell Lockhart about 
Miss Ward, or should I forbear ? Was there 
by any possibility some truth in the wild 
words of this girl, who had followed me down 
to this lonely place on a quest of such 
evident peril? I had always prided myself 
on reading character well, and the straight 
glance of those dark and troubled eyes added 
now to my perplexity. She looked like one 
who was speaking the truth. Still, to believe 
her was impossible, for to believe her was to 
doubt Lockhart. 

I walked on, wondering that he had not 
yet put in an appearance. I was now close 
to the golf links. Suddenly I heard to my 
right, and not a long way off, the sharp cry of 
a woman. It came on the night breeze, 
once, twice, then there was no further soupd. 
I rushed in the direction from which the cry 
had come, and the next moment stumbled 
up against Lockhart. He spoke in an eager 
voice — there was a tremble in it. 

" They have got me down here on some 
cock-and-bull idea of analyzing the water 
supply," he exclaimed. 

"But," I interrupted, " did you not hear 
that cry, a woman in some sort of trouble — 
did you not hear it?" 

"No, I can't say I did," he answered. 
" What is the matter with you, Head — you 
look quite overcome ? " 

" There was a sound just beyond you as if 
a woman was in trouble," I continued. " She 
cried out twice ; are you certain you did not 
hear her ? " 

"Quite certain," he replied. "But let 
us listen for a moment. If we hear it again, 
we must of course go to the rescue." . 

We both stood still. The huge form of 
the bacteriologist was between me and the 
sea. Not a sound broke the stillness. The 
night was dark but quite calm, the moon had 



byLiGOgle 



CI I I I _• I 1 1 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



12 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



not yet risen, only the distant roar of the 
waves came up to us as we listened. 

"You mistook the cry of one of the 
numerous sea-birds about here for that of 
a woman," said Lockhart ; u but, he it woman 
or not, I am afraid we have no time to attend 
to it any longer* Do you know that the 
tubes I brought with me have been stolen ? 
but I was too clever for my foes, whoever they 
are. I suspected mischief, and threw the 
real culture away while we were crossing the 
Solent, and substituted plain broth in its 
stead* Now, what are we to do ? This is a 
very ill protected place, and I believe there 
is only one policeman." 

"We must stay quiet until the morning/' I 
answered, " and then get help from Newport, 
With our evidence they have not the ghost of 
a chance. But, Lockhart, I have something 
painful to tell you* Your secretary " 

" Valentia Ward ! What do you mean ? 
Oh, don't worry 
about her now— 
she is safe in 
London* We 
shall catch the 
whole gang by 
the first light, if 
we are wary/ 1 

We continued 
to walk on and 
to talk in low 
voices. Now 
and then I 
observed that 
Lockhart glanced 
behind him. It 
was evident to me 
that he was in a 
state of extreme 
nervous tension. 
As for me, I 
could not get 
that startled and 
anguished cry out 
of my ears. I 
wished now that 
I had insisted on 
making a more 
thorough search 
when I had first heard it 

Suddenly, as we walked, I caught sight of 
a low shed in a hollow. It was partly sur- 
rounded by broken-down trees. 

" Let us make for that old golf-house," 
said Lockhart. " It has been long unoccu- 
pied ; we shall be safe from any observation 
there, and can discuss our plans in quitrt." 1 

I instantly acquiesced. I had made up 



my mind to tell Lockhart all about Miss 
Ward, I thought that I could do so best 
there. 

We entered the dark shadow of the trees, 
and as we did so I detected a light between 
the chinks in the walls. I started back. 

" I-ook ! " I whispered, t( the house is not 
unoccupied — they suspect us already. Let us 
go back/' 

"No time for that now," he answered, 
hardly breathing the words, they were uttered 
so low ; " it is true there is someone there — 
someone you would like to meet." 

Before I could move a step or utter a single 
cry he had flung me on the grass, his great 
hands clutched at my throat like a vice, and 
with all the weight of his huge body he knelt 
upon my chest and pinned me to the ground. 
The sudden violence of the attack, the awhil 
conviction that Valentia Ward had indeed 
warned me of a terrible danger, and that I 




IK I'INNESP M£ TO THE GROUND, 



byCiC 



k" 



myself was the duped victim of some hideous 
plot, completely stunned me and paralyzed 
resistance. The cruel hands crushed my 
throat and light swam before my eyes. 1 
felt dimly, without comprehending it, that my 
last hour had come. The earth seemed to 
recede away, and I remembered no more. 

When I returned to consciousness I was 
lying on a rough deal table inside the shed. 

Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE SEVEN KINGS. 



13 



I tried to move, but quickly discovered that 
I was both gagged and bound. By the dim 
light I could further see that I was sur- 
rounded by four men. They were all 
masked. Yes, at last I was in the clutch of 
the Brotherhood. As I watched, too stunned 
to realize all the awful meaning of the scene 
in which I found myself, another figure — 
also masked — slowly entered the room. It 
came forward and stood over me. My blood 
froze, for a pair of eyes of terrible power 
and Satanic beauty looked into mine. I had 
seen them before, and even through the 
disguise of the mask, I knew them. 
It was the voice of Mme. Koluchy herself 
that spoke. The words which now fell upon 
my ears I had heard from those same lips 
years ago in Naples. 

" For a traitor to this Brotherhood there is 
but one penalty. Death ! " 

Then followed clear and concise the words 
of the sentence. They were spoken in Italian, 
but the last words were English. 

"And neither earth nor sea shall hold his 
body, but it shall be rent asunder between 
them." 

A dead silence followed the uttering of 
this sentence. Without a word, two of the 
men lifted me in their arms and carried me 
out. One of them I felt certain by his size 
and bulk must be Lockhart himself. 

The little procession moved slowly down 
the path to Compton Bay, just below. I now 
abandoned all hope. Mme. Koluchy had 
won, and I had lost I had, indeed, been 
the victim of the cruellest and the most 
astute foe in the world. But Lockhart — 
Lockhart, whom I had trusted ! His name 
was well known in the scientific world. All 
men sang his praises, for was he not by his 
recent discoveries one of the benefactors of 
the race ; and yet — and yet — my dizzy brain 
almost turned at the thought— he was in 
reality one of. Madame's own satellites, a 
member of the Brotherhood of the Seven 
Kings. I saw, when too late, the whole 
deadly trap into which I had walked. The 
advertisement had been meant to arouse my 
attention. I had been inveigled down to 
Freshwater by means which only Mme. 
Koluchy could devise. Lockhart was my 
decoy. Why had I not listened to the words 
of the brave girl who had truly risked her 
life for me ? That twice-repeated cry must 
have come from her lips. Without doubt, in 
trying to follow me she had been captured 
by our deadly enemy. Lockhart himself, 
in all probability, had done the deed. Had 
\ not met' him coming up the path in the 



bydGOgle 



direction from which the cry had sounded ? 
What ghastly doom was even now hanging 
over her head ? 

While my heart beat wildly in my ears, 
and my brain swam, and my eyes were dizzy, 
wild thoughts such as the above came and 
flashed before me. Then there came a dizzy 
moment when all was blank, and then again 
the cloud was lifted, and Madame's sentence 
as she bent over me filled the entire horizon. 

" Neither earth nor sea shall hold his body, 
but it shall be rent asunder between them," 
she had said. Death awaited me beyond 
doubt, but I had yet to learn what a lingering 
death was to be mine. 

We reached the sands, .and I perceived 
lying at anchor within half a mile of the shore 
a small steam yacht. So this was the way 
Madame and her satellites had come here. 
Doubtless, when they had sealed the doom of 
their victims, they would sail away and never 
return. But where was the girl ? She was 
certainly not in the old golf-house ; what had 
they done with her ? 

I was lifted into a boat. Four men took the 
oars, and Madame Koluchy, still wearing her 
mask, sat in the stern and steered. Were we 
going to the yacht ? No. The men pulled 
the boat rapidly along, beneath the white chalk 
cliffs that towered above us. It was high tide, 
and the water rose in crested waves against 
the face of the cliffs. Suddenly we headed 
sharply round, and the men, shipping their 
oars, shot the boat beneath an overhanging 
lip into one of the chalk caverns that abound 
along the coast. I knew that I was entering 
my tomb. One of the oarsmen now lit a 
torch, and I at once saw something floating 
on the water, which looked like some heavy 
balks of timber lashed together to form a sort 
of raft. From the roof of the cave a chain 
was dangling. At the end of the chain was 
an iron circlet. 

Rapidly, and without a word, the ruffians 
seized me and placed me standing upright on 
the raft They quickly lashed my feet to the 
heavy block of wood with a strong rope. 
Another man snapped the iron ring round 
my neck, and the next instant they had 
pushed the boat back out of the cave. As 
they did so, I distinctly heard Lockhart : s 
voice address Mme. Koluchy. 

" The other boat is ready," he said. 

"How long will it float?" asked 
Madame. 

" From two to three hours," was the reply. 
" We shall lash her to the bottom, and " 

The boat turned the corner, and I lost the 
remainder of the sentence. For a moment 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



14 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



or two I thought of it, but the awful scene 
through which I had just passed confused 
my thoughts, and soon all feeling was con- 
centrated on my own awful position. 

My neck was fixed to the chain above, my 
feet to the timber in the sea below. The 
words of my terrible sentence burst upon me 
now with all their fiendish meaning. As the 
tide went down the whole weight of the raft 
would gradually drag my body from my head. 
The horror of such a fearful doom almost 
benumbed my faculties, and I stood as one 
already dead, being swayed up and down by 
the light swell that found its way into the 
cave. 

The moon rose presently, and its pale 
beams struck across my dungeon with a 
weird light The moon that ruled the tide 
was to be a witness of her own work that 
night I wondered vaguely how long I had 
to live ; but Lockhart must have given me 
a violent blow when he felled me to the 
ground, and I was still more or less 
stunned. Gradually, however, the cool air 
which blew into the cave revived me, and 
I was able more thoroughly to realize the 
position. I now perceived that the chain 
had at least two feet of slack. Thus the 
Brotherhood had arranged to prolong my 
tortures. Was there the most remote possi- 
bility of escape? I laughed to myself, a 
horrible laugh, as the hopelessness of the 
whole thing rushed over me. And yet there 
was a mad, passionate desire to make up to 
Miss Ward for my want of faith in her, which 
brought sudden fire to my heart and awoke 
each intellectual faculty to its fullest She 
also was doomed. In what way and how, I 
had but the vaguest idea; but that her 
death was certain, I felt sure. If I could 
escape myself I might yet save her. To 
rescue her now seemed to be the one 
important thing left to me in the world. 
I could only manage it by setting myself 
free. My hands were lashed behind me, but 
not, I noticed, very tightly. This was, my 
conquerors knew, unnecessary, for even with 
them free I could neither, on account of the 
ring of iron which held my neck, bend down 
sufficiently far to release my feet, nor drag 
myself up by the chain, as my feet were 
secured to the raft, and the effort would be 
too tremendous — I should soon have to let go. 
I determined, however, to free my hands if I 
could, and at last, with great pain and diffi- 
culty, worked off the cords that bound my 
wrists. I then instantly removed the gag 
from my lips, and felt a momentary sense of 
freedom. I stretched out my hands im- 



potently. Could they not in some way help 
me? 

My long scientific training enabled me 
now to think clearly and consecutively. The 
knowledge that on my life another in all 
probability depended spurred each endeavour 
to the highest point. This much at least was 
obvious. I could not stop the tide, nor release 
the iron ring from my neck, nor free my feet 
from the raft ; but there was one thing just 
possible. Could it by any means be done ? 
I grew cold with excitement as the thought 
struck me. Could I by any known means con- 
nect the raft with the slack of the chain above 
my head, and so let this connection, instead 
of my body, take the strain as the tide sank ? 
If I could manage this, it might give time for 
possible relief to come. Surely it seemed a 
hopeless task, for I could not reach down my 
hands to the raft But still, I determined to 
make the effort, herculean though it was. It 
would at any rate be better than the inaction 
of slowly waiting my doom. Each second 
the tide was sinking — each second therefore 
would render my task harder, as it would 
diminish the slack of the chain. 

I rapidly unbuckled the strong leather belt 
from my waist, and tried to stoop down 
sufficiently far to slip the end of the belt 
underneath the ropes that bound my feet. 
It was useless. At my utmost stretch I could 
not reach the ropes. But, stay, if only a big 
swell would come, I might just slip the belt 
through the rope. I crouched as low as I 
could, waiting and ready. The precious time 
sped on. Suddenly I /elt the raft dip deeply. 
I rose up to save my neck, and as the next 
wave lifted the raft high I crouched quickly 
down again, and just managed to slip the 
strap under the rope and through the buckle 
before the swell subsided. It was touch and 
go, but I had done it. 

To connect the belt to the chain above my 
head was the next thing to try. I had still 
the cord that had bound my hands. One 
end of this I now lashed securely to the slack 
of the chain, but when I had done so I found 
that it was not quite long enough to reach 
the belt. I tore my strong silk scarf 
from my neck and fastened it to the 
cord, and thus managed at last to bind 
cord and belt together. As I looked 
at the extraordinary rope which I had made 
for my deliverance my hope sank within me, 
for I felt certain that it was far too flimsy. 
The strain on it would become greater and 
greater each moment as the weight of the 
raft was thrown upon it. I seized the chain 
above my head with my hands, but I knew 



by K: 



j^ 



IC 



■_■ l l '_| 1 1 l u l I \s 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE SEVEN KINGS. 



iS 



of the swell In a 
must go, and then 
closed my eyes. 



well that directly the connection gave way I 
should not be able to bear the strain on my 
arms for more than a moment, and when I 
released them I should be instantly strangled. 

The terrible time dragged on, and the tide 
sank steadily lower and lower. I saw the 
silk scarf stretch, and could hear the belt 
below creaking with the weight at each fall 
few seconds I knew it 
all would be over. I 
My hour had come. 
Madame had indeed won, and I had lost. 
But what was that ? What had happened ? 

There was a loud crack, and I was sprawl- 
ing on the raft. One glance showed me 
what had taken place. The iron ring in the 
rock, which would have been amply strong 
enough to bear the strain of strangling me, 
had yielded to the combined weight of 
myself and the raft, which had been half 
drawn out of the water. The ring had been 
suddenly torn from the rock + It was indeed 
a miraculous deliverance, for I did not 
believe the extempore rope would 
have held another second, Yes, 
the worst danger was over, but 
I was still in an evil plight, I 
quickly unlashed my feet, and 
then, with the ring of iron round 
my neck and the chain attached, 
sprang on to a projecting ledge 
of rock at the mouth of the cave. 
I saw to my joy that the fall of 
the tide was now on my side, for 
it had left me a means of regain- 
ing the sandy bay. 

Plunging and stumbling, some- 
times neck deep in water, I at 
last reached the sands and fell 
down, trembling with exhaustion. 

A dark bank of clouds had 
crept up and blotted out the 
moon, I struggled to my feet 
and looked out to sea. Where 
was Miss Ward? To go to her 
rescue now was my first and only 
duty. I gathered the long chain 
in my hand, and ran up the 
winding pathway to the summit 
of the cliff. My intention was to 
make my way with all possible 
speed across the Downs to Fresh- 
water. I had gone about two 
hundred yards on the top of the 
cliff when I saw a man coming 
to meet me. I hurried up to 
him, and saw to my joy that 
he was one of the coastguards. 
I quickly told him my story, 



pointing as I spoke to my dripping clothes 
and to the chain about my neck. 

The man was aghast, and stared at me 
with absolute amazement and horror. 

"Well, sir," he replied, "and you think 
the young lady is in a similar plight?" 

I told him what I had overheard Mme, 
Koluchy and Lockhart say. 

" Then they have put her in a boat and 
allowed her to drift with the tide," said the 
man, "The tide is running out, and what 
wind there is is from the east. I have been 
a coastguard here for more than twenty years, 
but I'm blessed if ever I heard such a tale as 
this before." 

"We must save her," I said "What is 
the quickest way in which we can get a boat? 
If anything is to be done, there is not a 
moment to lose." 

The man considered for a moment, without 
speaking, 

II There's a gent down here for the 
summer," he said* "His name is Captain 




by Google 



THE BOTTOM OF THE &QAT WAS THE MOTIONLESS FORM 

or a woMMf,* 

Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



i6 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



Oldham, and there's his yacht lying out 
yonder in the bay. Maybe he would let her 
go out again for such a thing as this. It's no 
use trying with a rowing boat. Captain 
Oldham has got a search-light on board, 
too." 

" Is he on the yacht now ? " I asked. 

" Yes, sir ; he's sleeping on board to-night, 
for he has only just come in from a cruise. 
The luck is on your side now." 

" The very thing ! " I cried. " Don't let us 
lose a single moment." 

We ran down the road to the bay, and a 
few moments later my new friend and I were 
pulling rapidly out to Captain Oldham's 
yacht 

As we approached my companion hailed 
the man on watch, and the owner himself 
appeared as we scrambled up the ladder. 

In the presence of the coastguard, I 
repeated my extraordinary story. The 
emphasis of my words, and the iron ring 
round my neck, carried conviction. 

" And the girl risked her life for you ? " 
said the old seaman, his eyes almost start- 
ing from his head, in his excitement. 

"That she did," I replied, "and I 
treated her brutally — I refused to believe 
in her." 

" And you have good cause to think 
they set her adrift in a leaky boat ? " 

" I fear so, and I want to search these 
waters without an instant's delay." 

" It shall be done," he cried, " My God ! 
I never heard of such devilish cruelty." 

He turned, and shouted his orders to the 
astonished engineer and crew. All possible 
haste was made, and I tried to control my 
own growing impatience in getting the search- 
light ready. I saw, with satisfaction, that it 
was one of the latest Admiralty pattern, such 
as the steamers use in the Suez Canal. 
There was a powerful arc-light supplied from 
an accumulator. The moon had sunk and 
it was quite dark* now, but with this light, 
not a speck on the sea would escape us 
within a radius of a mile. 

I went forward, holding the light in its pro- 
jecting apparatus, and in about ten minutes 
we were steaming out to sea. Regulating 
the apparatus with the hand-gear, I began 
to play the great light to and fro in front of 
us. Two of the crew stood beside me 
sharply on the look-out. We had already 
passed the Needles, but still there was nothing 
to be seen. Captain Oldham was at the 



wheel, and he now turned the yacht's head 
more determinedly out to sea. Mile after 
mile we went, without success. A hopeless 
despair began to creep over me. If that girl 
died, I felt that I could never hold up my 
head again. Suddenly one of the men 
beside me sang out : — 

"Skiff on the port beam, sir. Hard a 
starboard ! " 

The engine bell rang to " full speed," and 
in a short time I saw that we were quickly 
bearing down on what appeared to be an 
empty boat, aimlessly drifting with its gunwale 
nearly down to the water-line. What did it 
mean ? Was the girl really in the boat ? 
Were we in time to save her? 

The yacht stopped, a boat was lowered, 
and the coastguard and I and two of the men 
pulled for all we were worth towards her. 

Lying at the bottom of the boat was the 
motionless form of a woman. Her head was 
just above water, her eyes were shut ; she 
looked like one dead. One glance at her 
face was sufficient to show me who she was. 
Was I in time to save her? 

We quickly released the thongs which 
bound the poor girl, and lifted her into our 
boat. From there we brought her quickly 
to the yacht. 

" Take the boat in tow," I cried to one of 
the men ; "we may get some evidence from 
her that will help us." 

This was quickly done, and we were soon 
steaming back to Freshwater Bay. 

Alas ! however, my worst fears were con- 
firmed. I was too late. All that was possible 
was done, but Valentia Ward never recovered. 
The shock and exposure had killed her. 
Thus my efforts on her behalf had proved 
unavailing. She had risked and lost her life 
for mine. 

I telegraphed to Dufrayer early on the 
following morning, and he arrived at Fresh- 
water at noon. To him I told my extra- 
ordinary and awful adventure. 

One of our first cares was to examine the 
boat. We then perceived what Madame's 
fiendish cruelty really meant A hole had 
been made in the bottom in such a way that 
the boat would take several hours to sink. 
Thus Valentia was also to be the victim 
of a lingering death. The name of the yacht 
to which the boat belonged had been care- 
fully scraped off the side,' thus obliterating 
any chance of obtaining evidence against 
Madame. 



by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



Illustrated Interviews. 




LDC — MISS MARIE CORELLL 
By Arthur H. Lawrence, 

Illustrated by Photographs specially taken for this article. 

N beginning the exceedingly article, I confess that I am animated by the 

hope — and this is the " special reason " to 
which I have already alluded — that it will be 
possible for me to do something to negative 
the extraordinary caricatures of the charming 
novelist which so many of my " friends " on 
the Press have so industriously circulated. 

Prior to the 



pleasurable task of recording 
the only "interview " yet pub- 
lished with Miss Marie Corelli, 
I confess that, for one special 
reason above all others, I 

could wish that it may be read by every one 

of the hundreds 

of thousands 

who form her 

great reading 

public all the 

world over, and 

who, like myself, 

have Felt in- 
debted to her for 

so many happy 

hours by reason 

of the brilliancy 

and magic power 

of her work. 
It is a perfectly 

natural thing that 

those of us who 

are interested in 

any fine work 

should feel an 

ever-increasing 

interest in the 

personality of the 

worker, and it 

was on this basis, 

and on no other, 

that, after receiv- 
ing a very court e- 

ously worded 

refusal, 1 ven- 
tured to urge my 

request on the 

gifted authoress. 

The fame which 

Miss Marie 

Corelli has 

earned has been 

entirely gained 
by the public 
recognition of 
her work. If, at 
any time, the 
64 advertisement" 
of reviews, paragraphs, 




the like could have been of the slightest 
assistance to her, that time has long since 
gone by ; and while I feel that this 
statement applies in no less degree to this 

Vol ivL— 3 



publication of 
this "interview," 

one or two bio- 
graphical articles 
concerning Miss 
Marie Corelli 
have been written 
by those who 
have met her, 
and countless 
other articles 
have been written 
by those who 
have known 
nothing about 
her, a statement 
which also ap- 
plies to those 
who have written 
innumerable 
paragraphs eman- 
ating from certain 
journalists, who 
have made up in 
rudeness and 
vulgarity for what 
has been lacking 
in knowledge and 
wit I have read 
the criticisms— 
and have been 
the personal re- 
cipient of verbal 
criticisms — of 
her work by pro- 
fessional critics, 
whose main 
qualification has 
confessedly been 
that they have 
carefully ab- 

[ 3fUm CotelU iff tkm right hand fau rt-1 Stained f T O HI 

interviews, and reading the work which they have pretended 






to criticise. 

I shall feel happy indeed with the count- 
less pleasant memories which are associated 
with my visit to the country retreat of Miss 

"IVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



i8 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



Marie Corelli, and the many long conversa- 
tions which I had with her there, if I am 
able to pafcs on — in some measure — the 
impression which . I have received of her 
magnetic charm, rare strength of character, 
her refreshing sweetness of manner, and, not 
least, the intense womanliness which indeed 
one might have anticipated — but for our 
friends on the Press -as pertaining to the 
personality of one whose work tends to show 
forth these qualities, and which, added to her 
genius, have made her, as she is, the best 
read and most popular novelist of the day. 

I have described Woodhall Spa in Lincoln- 
shire as Miss Marie Corelli's country retreat. 
It may not be generally known — I have not 
seen it mentioned — that the novelist is giving 
up her town house in Longridge Road, and 
that the house which she has occupied 
for the past nine or ten years will know her 
no more ; and, indeed, for some time Miss 
Corelli has regarded her suite of rooms in 
the Royal Hotel, Woodhall Spa, as a home. 

It was at the beginning of the year that 
Miss Corelli underwent an operation — of a 
similar nature to that endured by Sarah 
Bernhardt— but at the hands of an exceed- 
ingly clever lady-doctor, Dr. Mary Scharlieb ; 
and though Miss Marie Corelli was veritably 
at "death's door," as the phrase has it, 
the period of her convalescence at Brighton 
coincided, I noticed, with some particularly 
virulent attacks in the Press on the part of 
the exceedingly gallant jesters to whom I have 
already alluded ; and when, in the early stage 
of her recovery, Miss Corelli objected to 
the suggestion that bulletins should be issued 
by way of relieving the trouble caused by the 
interminable calling of innumerable kindly 
inquirers, one of her doctors, Dr. Frampton, • 
very truly remarked that his patient "could not 
even own to illness without being accused of 
self-advertisement" Happily, however, Miss 
Corelli has now completely recovered, and 
at the time of my visit — the first week in May 
— 1 was delighted to find her in the best of 
health and good spirits, a quintessence, if I 
may say so, of the sunshine about her. 

Miss Corelli's birthday is on the first of 
May, and no interviewer could have been 
given a more auspicious time for his visit. 
Springtime, and his fair hostess — whom 
he had heard described as a " termagant," 
and I know not what else — sweetness itself. 
Moreover, to be prosaic, I had so arranged 
my arrival that I was in good , time 
for afternoon tea — and the Scotch express 
is rarely, if ever, unpunctual ! — and though 
if I were a great descriptive writer, and 

Digitiz 



had the happy knack which mainly 
pertains, I believe, to the lady journalist, of 
describing costumes and surroundings with 
inherent ease and good taste, I might be 
tempted to enlarge on " my first impression " 
of Miss Marie Corelli as she received me in 
her pretty drawing-room, I must content 
myself with the remembrance, and the mere 
statement, that I felt a sense of relief — if I 
may boldly say so — that here was no dis- 
illusionment : quite the reverse; and though 
I had not paid much attention to the 
quaint "descriptions" of those whom I 
knew had not met her, I certainly wish 
I had the ability to describe, what I 
should certainly like to describe — the 
vivacity, the personal charm and sincerity, 
the real feminine grace of her every 
movement, all too rare a charm, I think, 
nowadays. A more definite description 
than this may, perhaps, be gained infer- 
entially throughout the article. 

The accompanying illustrations may, per- 
haps, be explained at this point as furnishing 
the scene of the many walks and talks which 
I was subsequently privileged to have with the 
charming novelist. First, a view of the Royal 
Hotel itself; of the study, in which so many 
— to me — pleasant conversations took place ; 
then one of the novelist's favourite walks, and 
the wondrously pleasant " Winter Garden, 5 ' 
which furnished so good an opportunity for 
a further talk after dinner. The inscriptions 
below all these illustrations are facsimiled 
from Miss Corelli's own handwriting. 

It was in one of the Winter Garden lounges 
that, at my request, Miss Corelli permitted 
herself to be photographed one morning, 
in the brightest of weather, which prevailed 
throughout the time of my stay at Woodhall 
Spa. This most interesting portrait is the 
one which has been reproduced on the first 
page of this article. 

Her own rooms all face the beautiful woods, 
which she can enter at once by merely cross- 
ing the road. Beyond the woods, as Miss 
Corelli told me — and I was soon enabled to 
verify the fact for myself — " are miles and 
miles of heather-covered moorland, over 
which blow the invigorating airs, impregnated 
with iodine, which make Woodhall Spa such 
an admirable retreat for those whose nerves 
are racked by the worry and fret of town life, 
and who need * bracing up ' to renew the 
fight once more." 

The Winter Garden, a corner of which is 
depicted in the first illustration, from a photo- 
graph taken for me by Miss Corelli's friend, 
Miss Bertha Vyver, is a thousand yards square, 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



ILLUSTRATED INTERVIEWS. 



19 



wherein tall palms and flowering camellias 
flourish, and even grapes grow ; and here the 
novelist is very fond of strolling about, and 
may be seen sometimes with a very charming 
little girl clinging to her arm, u Ida," the 
small, pretty daughter of the proprietor of the 
Royal Hotel, Mr. Came, who built the place, 
and who is well known for his taste and 
cleverness as an architect, being formerly the 
favourite pupil of the late Sir Digby Wyatt 

In the Winter Garden a band plays during 
the tabk-d*kdie dinner, and on two days 
of the week there is a dance for the 
residents and for all the visitors who care 
to join in. 

I was interested 
to find Miss Corel li 
very enthusiastic 
also concerning the 
tf Horncastle 
Amateur Orches- 
tral Band," more 
especially as the 
keenness of her 
critical musical 
instinct is well 
known, largely due 
to the fact that 
she was educated 
for the musical 
profession, and 
had intended^oing 
to Lei p sic to com- 
plete her education 
in music when the 
writing of " The 
Romance of Two Worlds 
ingpoint of her career. 

" I wish," she remarked to me, " that they 
could get such good players in some of our 
London theatres* These Horncastle men 
all love music, and play for the love of it; and 
it is quite absurd to think that the Germans 
are the only people who can be taught 
to play and sing in parts. The English are 
quite as musical— they only want someone to 
'lead, 1 and a little encouragement. They 
play here in perfect time and tune, with verve 
and fire and feeling, and are a standing proof 
of denial against that oft-repeated parrot cry, 
*The tf* musical English ! J 

41 One reason that I am so fond of Wood- 
hall is that it is as yet an unspoilt place- 
fresh and sweet and restful ; and, then, I have 
such a charming abode at the Royal. It 
is the only hotel I have ever been able to 
work in, with the one exception of King's, at 
Brighton," 

1 might be tempted to add that one of the 



walks which Miss Corelli showed me brought 
us to the golfing ground, which is within a 
short distance of the hotel, to say nothing of 
the smoothest tennis-courts imaginable, 
croquet ground, and so forth ; but one thing 
I must not omit to mention. My friends 
need not wander farther than Wood hall to 
hear the nightingale. Night and morning, 
and, in fact, during the better part of the 
day, the nightingales vied with each other, 
each trying to out-sing the other, hoping to 
win the affection of the lady- nightingale whom 
they were serenading, 

11 I determined," Miss Marie Corelli told 



1 . 




N MM 


* 




IT l ■ w 







?Az /Zeyaf //&&&. W00<dG<b& S/04 . 



proved the turn- 



me, u that if I lived through my serious illness 
this winter, to be at the Royal for my birth- 
day, the first of May — and I am glad that my 
hopes were fulfilled On May morning I 
opened my window here to see the bright 
sunshine, and to hear all the birds singing, 
and the first call of the cuckoo ! My friends 
filled my rooms with flowers — so you see the 
whole business was quite a spring festival !" 

Here the reader may imagine that tea was 
quite ended, and that I disappeared from the 
Villa Daheim to dress for dinner; but as I 
kept no diary {and if I had, it would have 
recorded nothing which is not well 
remembered), I need only say that it can be 
understood that in subsequent conversations 
many points came up for discussion, in no 
precise order, perhaps, for it would be an 
unhappy chat which could go along on pre- 
conceived lines ; but whether or no Miss 
Corelli ever cares to have the presence of an 
interviewer inflicted upon her again, I ought 
to explain that the following inquiries were 

IVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



20 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



somewhat rather more colloquially rendered, 
and occurred at intervals on different occa- 
sions. One could not have the hardihood to 
inflict such an inquisitional process at one 
sitting. 

" My favourite amusement? Music, I 
think. It is the most impersonal of recrea- 
tions. But for me it must be music in the 
open air, on the water, or in a quiet room. 
I do not like concerts, or large musical 
assemblies of any kind. The unexpected in 
music is music's greatest charm. I cannot 
bear to sit with a row of people in stalls, as 
if we were all sheep in pens, while we are 
waiting for the appearance of some gentle- 
man in a white tie and tail-coat, who assures 
us that he is a ' Friar of Orders Grey ' ; or a 
lady in a low evening dress, who works her 
whole body and her whole song steadily 
towards the top note, and rests upon it with 
a thrilling scream. I do not call this sort of 
thing music at all. In fact, I dislike the 
trouble of concert-going as much as I dislike 
the bother and invariable disappointment of 
theatre-going. " 

" Then you find theatre-going disappoint- 
ing?" 

" Most assuredly. It is not as if we had 
any great actors worth seeing. They are all 
mediocre. Irving is an artistic student of 
things dramatic and poetic, but he is not a 
great histrion. Ellen Terry is nothing but a 
very graceful * comedienne.' Forbes Robert- 
son is, I suppose, our greatest rising actor, 
and I admire his voice and perfect elocution. 
But he never rouses me to the least emotion 
or enthusiasm. 

" Do you really think," Miss Marie Corelli 
continued, " that there is anyone on the 
stage worth going out to see on a cold night, 
for instance, when your own room, with its 
blazing fire and cosy chairs, invites you to 
remain and read books full of beautiful 
thoughts and classic wisdom ? I would 
rather stay at home with Camille Flammarion's 
latest volumes, or Clifford Harrison's admir- 
able ' Notes on the Maigin ' essays, than see 
the most famous mime that ever pretended 
to be what he is not, aided by grease-paint 
and footlight-glare." 

" So, then, I take it that you don't believe 
in acting as an art ? " 

" Do you call it an art ? Well, I suppose 
it is, but you must own that it is on the 
lowest rung of the ladder. Even monkeys 
mimic men, and that is just all that actors 
do. The more they mimic, the cleverer the 
monkeys are. I like the real, true men ; the 
imitations are irritating ! " 

Google 



"And amongst modern writers, who are 
your favourite authors ? " 

" I have no particular favourites ; I find 
something good or charming in all of them. 
Of course, none of us can attain to the magic 
utterance of grand old Sir Walter Scott, and 
my beloved Charles Dickens, whose books 
never fail to cheer me in all my ' dark 
hours ' ; but I do not, like the professional 
critic, hunt for faults in my contemporaries 
— I prefer to find good qualities. I like 
Rudyard Kipling's short stories, but I don't 
think the name of 'poet ' can justly apply to 
him, not yet, at any rate, and not as long 
as he writes what he must know, in his own 
mind, is mere jingle-verse ; but two of his 
stanzas I carry always in my memory, and I 
heartily wish he would enunciate more of 
such splendid speech : — 

When Earth's last picture is painted and the tubes 

are twisted and dried, 
When Ihe oldest colours have faded, and the youngest 

critic has died, 
We shall rest, ar.d, faith, we shall need it — lie down 

for an seon or two, 
Till the Master of all Good Workmen shall put us to 

work anew ! 
And only the Master shall praise us, and only the 

Master shall blame ; 
And no one shall work for money, and no one shall 

work for lame — 
But each for the joy of the working, ar.d each, in his 

separate star, 
Shall draw the Thing as he sees It for the God of 

Things as They Are ! 

"The joy of the working," Miss Corelli 
added, "yes, that is the only true joy in 
the profession of literature ! " 

" Your fight w r ith the critics has passed 
into a proverb," I remarked to Miss Corelli, 
one day ; "how did it begin ? " 

" They began it," replied Miss Corelli, 
with a smile. "They threw the first stone — 
had they not done so, I should not have 
required to defend myself. When I first started 
on my career, with the still popular ' Romance 
of Two Worlds/ I had an unbounded faith 
in the generosity and conscientiousness of 
literary people who had already made their 
mark, and who could therefore afford to help 
others up the hill. That faith was quickly 
destroyed. Without even troubling to read 
what I had written, they l went ' for me, as 
the phrase goes, and, resenting the deliberate 
injustice of the attack, I ' went ' for them in 
return. I know it is considered much more 
' womanly ' to sit down lamb-like and take all 
the kicks and blows with the meekness of a 
patient Grizel. And in certain parts of the 
world you may still see carts drawn by a 
woman and an on yoked together, while the 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



ILLUSTRATED INTERVIEWS. 



21 






man-driver sits aloft and curls his whip round 
with a stinging blow on woman and ox 
equally. This is just the sort of attitude 
some men assume towards women in art. I 
do not speak for myself alone — I speak for 
all my sex. 

M According to certain preconceived mascu- 
line notions of 'pure womanliness '—one 
ought to be quite glad and thankful to be 
kicked and whipped by the * nobler ' sex. 
But then, you see, I do not feel that way, and 
I do not admire the lethargic character of 
* patient Gri/eL J And so, being attacked, 
1 defended myself. And it seems I won. 
At any rate, the enemies 1 have now are of so 
slight and trumpery a character r and have so 



*' will therefore obtain it (should ibey wish to do 
• 4 so) in the usual way wilh the resl ul (he public, 
*- i.e., through the I x>uk sellers and libraries/' 

The recollection of this notice, and the 
way in which this proceeding put to the test, 
and, to my mind, largely displayed the artifici- 
ality, of the "advertisement 11 which " reviews " 
are supposed to give to a book, and the 
characteristic courage of the proceedings came 
back to me very forcibly as I strolled through 
the woods with the charming novelist one 
bright, sunshiny morning ; and as that par- 
ticular book has been a greater success than 
perhaps any other book of our time, I thought 
of the mighty reviewers whose dignity had 
been considerably hurt by this action, ar.d 







little power to injure me, that it is not worth 
while drawing sword against them. But, I 
repeat, had they not begun the contest, it 
would never have taken place at all. As it 
is, I am glad of the fight— it has done me 
good ; and it has also enlightened the public 
as to the manner of the critics' methods. The 
public is always the umpire, you know, and 
it has certainly so far decided in my favour/' 
It will be remembered as of comparatively 
recent date that the Author v. Reviewer 
question, to which Miss Corelli alluded, was 
brought to a head by the following notice 
which was printed on every copy published 
of M The Sorrows of Satan " : — 

"Special Notice,— No copies of this book 
" are sent out for review. Members of the Press 



contrasted the imaginary picture which was 
drawn of a woman who could safeguard 
herself in this way and the actual 
woman before rne, slight in figure, so 
prettily dressed, and the pretty dress so 
gracefully worn ; the soft, golden-brown hair 
clustering over the forehead of the fair woman 
who is dainty and pretty without loss of 
dignity and womanly strength — the contrast 
was so piquant that I could not repress, and 
had no occasion to repress, a smile, as I made 
some inquiries upon this point, and Miss 
Corelli replied : — 

"Oh, yes, that's all over now. My books 
will never be sent out for review again/' she 
added, cheerfully, and without the slightest 
tinge of bitterness. 

"NERSITY Of MICHIGAN 



22 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



" You see, by not sending the book out for 
review, I simplified matters very much. The 
critics gave sufficient evidence of the fact 
that they had not read my previous book, 
1 Barabbas,' and so for the future I save them 
any further trouble, and my publishers a 
good deal of expense." 

"And which books do your public like 
most ? " 

" ' Barabbas,' which was supposed to be 
reviewed, and ' The Sorrows of Satan,' which 
was not sent out for review, have been the 
most popular. Over a hundred thousand 
copies have been sold of each — there is but 
a very slight difference in the sale of the 
two books, and, of course, they are still 
selling." 

" Are you personally acquainted with any 
of your contemporaries in literature ? " 

" No. I have had letters on matters of 
business from Sir Walter Besant and others, 
but I have never met any of them. Lord 
Tennyson was the only great man who ever 
encouraged me in my work, and this he did 
by a personal letter of praise shortly before 
he died. I suppose, however, that I piay 
call Mr. Clifford Harrison a 'contemporary 
in literature,' for he is a most charming writer, 
although his literary work is, as yet, not suffi- 
ciently known to the public. He is certainly 
one of my kindest friends. Mr. Stead is 
answerable for the absurd rumour that I 
depicted myself as ' Mavis Clare,' in * The 
Sorrows of Satan,' a mistake which he after- 
wards withdrew, with an apology ' for that and 
every other injustice ' he had done me. Mr. 
David Christie Murray has, more recently, 
taken up Mr. Stead's error, and, I hear, has 
1 gone ' for me in one of his papers, or series 
of articles, or something, entitled ' My 
Contemporaries in Fiction.' Oddly enough, 
I never knew he was a * contemporary ' at 
all, until he thus announced it. I have 
never read anything he has written, so I 
cannot presume to judge him ; but I would 
certainly never state that I considered he 
had depicted himself as the hero of one of 
his own stories, unless I knew him personally 
and intimately, and had some right to com- 
prehend his characteristics." 

It was the sight of the huge " post " which 
was brought into the drawing-room one 
afternoon for Miss Marie Corelli, together 
with the fact, which I was permitted to dis- 
cover, that a considerable part of her corre- 
spondence is from entire strangers, which 
prompted my question : " A great many 
people write to you about your books, do 
they not?" 



" Don't speak of it ! You have no idea 
what a mass of strange letters reaches me 
from all parts of the world ; it is quite a 
business to get them answered ; in fact, 
some are never answered at all. The 
desperate love-letters from amorous swains 
— entirely unknown to me, of course — go 
into the fire at once." 

One such epistle at least had come by 
that post, and I glanced through it 
before it met with its well -merited oblivion. 
I found it was from an officer on one 
of the big liners, and after the startling 
adjuration, "My darling sweet Marie," it 
began with a reproach for his first letter 
having met with no answer, and was 
couched in a magnificently emotional strain 
throughout ! 

" Then there are the people who tell me 
the whole history of their lives in several 
sheets of closely-written and crossed letter- 
paper, and they ask my advice as to how to 
go on — these are very difficult to deal with. 
Then come the would-be translators of my 
books, the would-be dramatists, and the 
autograph-hunter-s. Their name is legion ; 
nothing daunts them. They leave their 
books at my door — when I'm in town — with 
the statement that they will ' call again ' — in 
the coolest manner, and they do their utmost 
to make me devote the rest of my life to the 
monotonous business of merely signing my 
name ! 

"Then there are the anonymous letter- 
writers, a large class by themselves, and whose 
efforts are generally limited to abusing either 
myself or my friends. Some of these assure 
me that they are sorry for me, that I am going 
straight to perdition, and that if I will only 
read a tract entitled ' Stop on the Way,' or 
words to that effect, I may yet manage to 
reach Heaven, as it were, by the skin of my 
teeth. l Let me implore you,' says one feeling 
correspondent, 'to reconsider your position in 
the spirit of I. Timothy ' ! Then I occa- 
sionally get anonymous communications 
abusing my respective publishers, and 
I can never take a holiday with- 
out receiving something in the way of an 
epistolary condemnation for daring to rest 
and amuse myself. When I took Killiecrankie 
Cottage for a summer season in Scotland, I 
used to get letters from complete strangers, 
asking me — in fact, almost commanding me 
— to send them grouse and salmon by the 
next train ! And quite recently, I have had 
a letter all the way from Cape Colony, calmly 
demanding a violin. Here it is," and Miss 
Corelli showed icie die following ingenuous 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



ILLUSTRATED INTERVIEWS. 



*3 



appeal Of course, I omit the name and 
address : — 

Dear Miss Corelli,— Please send me one of your 
old vioJins. I want so much, and my mother cannot 
afford to buy oc e* I saw in a bonk a picture of one 
of your rooms, and in it I saw a beautiful violin and 
harp, &o I thought I would ask you for one. Please 
don't be cross* 

*' But, of course," Miss Corelti continued, 
** there is the other side of the question : the 



It is from a young man about to enter 
the Church of England ministry, and in the 
course of his letter he writes : " When I 
think that I am hut a unit among the millions, 
living and yet unborn, to whom your words 
are, and will be, the breath of life, I thank 
my Maker that, amid the sin of the world, 
one should be raised up to point us back to 
God ; one should be granted courage and 




$ua*fA£4 £&mf*aL £fr /Am Abv&£*^£ ^™^ 



beautiful, helpful, gracious letters I receive 
from people, who are good enough to say 
they have derived comfort from what I write. 
From hard-working miners in Texas, from 
Army and Navy men, from hospital nurses, 
from little children even (who sympathize 
with Lionel and Jessamine in 'The Mighty 
Atom *X come all sorts of loving and kindly 
greetings for which I am deeply grateful," 

Everyone acquainted with Miss Marie 
Corelli's work is well aware of the moral 
purpose which it inculcates, the anti-pruriency, 
anti-sensualism, and, not least, anti-scepticism 
which she enforces so powerfully, In this 
regard I thought one of the letters which 
Miss Corelli showed me exceedingly interest- 
ing, but when the novelist acceded to my 
request that I might publish a sentence or 
two of it, she said, laughingly, " But I warn 
you that people will say I wrote it myself"; 
but 1 think I may risk this kind imputation. 



wisdom to say, and say with no uncertain 
voice, those things which are true, and noble, 
and right That you suffer many things 
because you dare to do so is commonly 
reported, and doubtless truthfully, since 
the proclamation of righteousness is ever a 
brier-strewn pathway j but some day all men 
shall bless your name and call you good." 

u Perhaps the most interesting part of my 
correspondence," Miss Corelli exclaimed, 
"comes from India. Numbers of the native 
Indian Princes and Rajahs are in constant 
communication with me, and appear to be 
very much affected by, and interested in, 
* Barabbas/ which has been translated into 
Hindustani. 

"Nothing amuses me more than to find 
some angry, no n -successful man abusing me 
in the Press, and telling the public that I 
only appeal, in my books, to readers in 
' Camberwell and Brixton J ! It is 

"TVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



very 



24 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



funny, indeed ; but the public know pretty 
well how to take such statements. Of 
course, Camberwell and Brixton must be in- 
cluded in the London radius; and I believe 
the Prince of Wales, who has always been 
most kindly in his appreciation of my books, 
has property there ! But I venture to 
think I may count thousands of friends 
in America, Australia, and, indeed, wherever 
the English language is spoken ; and the 
Continental peoples pay me the compliment 
of constantly translating all my novels into 
their different languages. ' The Mighty 
Atom,' translated into Russian, has just been 
published under the auspices of the Holy 
Synod in Russia, I count among my ' Royal ' 
renders Queen Margherita of Italy, the 
Empress of Austria, and ' Carmen Sylva,' the 



ments which serve as some compensation for 
many of the inflictions — the persistence of 
the interviewer amongst them—which popu- 
larity may entail 

When discussing with Miss Corelli the rare 
skill and ability of the lady-surgeon who 
attended her— Mary Scharlieb, M*D.and M.S,, 
of Harley Street, whom Miss Corelli described 
as "one of the bravest and cleverest of 
women" — I was interested to find that my 
hostess complained of the brusqueness 
prevalent in a section of the medical profes- 
sion. Miss Corelli gave me an instance : — 

fl One very eminent gentleman said, when 
consulting with my step-brother as to the 
pros and cons of the question, ' Once I get 
her into my surgical home 1 will be a match 
for twenty Marie Corellis ! ' However, I 





§m ^ 




!£&£%£ ■ -/* .J 


\ 


! 


9 - ■ 



Queen of Roumania, 
and I think it will 
hardly be said that 
these are unintelligent women !" 

I think the reader will agree with me that 
Miss Corelli is in no need of M testimonials/' 
and so, with apologies to her, I quote a few 
words from another letter, before touching on 
another subject " Your books have afforded 
Her Majesty (the Empress of Austria) many 
hours of happiness and rest She not only 
admires your talent and style of writing, but 
also your poetical imagination, with which 
your works overflow," 

Miss Marie Corelli has certainly com milted 
one great crime— she has attained popularity ! 
I imagine, however, that such letters as I 
have quoted are in themselves human docu- 



/f ¥avfuf£ Wa&C ■ 



imselves hun 



preferred to trust my- 
self to a woman rival 
in his own profession, 
and my gratitude to Mrs, Schailieb, not 
only for her brilliant skill, but for her 
tenderness, sympathy, and untiring care, will 
be a life-long tribute/' 

Finally, I asked Miss Corelli to tell me 
about her future work. 

"Nothing will be published this year," 
Miss Corelli told me, "not even an article. 
If all goes well, my next book will be pub- 
lished in the spring of next year. I began 
it just before my illness, and so far only 
seven chapters are written. Curiously enough, 
the last words I dictated to my secretary, 
before my illness, and which came at the end 
of the sev^f^fthapic'r, ran : ' You will soon 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



ILLUSTRATED INTERVIEWS. 25 



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REDUCED F AC-SIMILE OF A PAGE OF MISS MARIE CORELLI S MS, 

be well/ It was an unconscious prophecy, interest, so far as the characters are concerned, 

No, I won't tell you the title of the new is purely secular, and the heroine, Judith, the 

book ; even the publishers never know that sister of Judas Iscariot, is, of course, quite 

until the typed MS. is in their hands, and all an imaginary character." 
I can tell you about it is that it will be about Miss Corelli told me that where the 

the length of ' Barabbas ' and 'The Sorrows references made in it are not secular, they are 

of Satan/ and I am afraid it will excite the wholly Scriptural, and anyone knowing Miss 

clergy of all denominations a good deal." Corelli's work will not need to be told that 

Some further information which Miss there is nothing in the play to hurt the most 

Corelli gave me will be new to the public. susceptible taste, so that I imagine that if any 

" I have written a dramatic version of objection is entertained in censorial quarters 

'Barabbas/ but I understand that the Lord it will be quickly withdrawn. Certainly the 

Chamberlain takes exception to it on the play, written in this case by the authoress 

score that it touches too closely on the of the book, would draw all London and the 

Passion. But I need not tell you that the provinces, and it is greatly to be hoped that 

VoL xvi.— 4» 



bydOOgle 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



26 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



no objection will be upheld against such a 
play, accentuated as such an opinion would 
be by the fact that, as against so noble a 
conception, so many plays of questionable 
taste are permitted to pass. No doubt any 
imaginary objection on the part of the censor 
will be soon swept away. 

It should be mentioned that Miss Corelli 
does all her work in the morning between 
ten and two. Pencil notes are made, to a 
large extent, out of doors, and in the course 
of one walk Miss Corelli showed me a rustic 
seat in a sunny corner of the pine woods 
which she regards as her out-of-door 
"sanctum," and the manuscript of the books 
used to be written carefully by the authoress 
for the printer, as shown in one of the illus- 
trations ; but latterly the novelist has dictated 
the final draft to her secretary, who, after a 
copy has been submitted and corrected, 
proceeds to type-write the three copies 
required, one being retained by the novelist, 
and the other two finding their way into the 
hands of the English and American publishers 
respectively. 

Soon after my visit to Woodhall, the news 
came of Mr. Gladstone's death, and when dis- 
cussing the personality of the great statesman 
at a subsequent visit, which I paid Miss 
Corelli during her short stay in town, I was 
exceedingly interested to find that, on two 
occasions, Mr. Gladstone called personally, 
and without previous notice, on Miss Marie 
Corelli, much to her surprise ; and while 
entertaining the veteran statesman at after- 
noon tea, during which he conversed with her 
on the subject of her work, she smilingly 
ventured to ask him, in the presence of one 
or two friends, why he had honoured her with 
a visit The reply of the Grand Old Man 
was repeated to me by Miss Vyver, who was 
present on that occasion. " Because," said 
he, " I was curious to see for myself the 
personality of a young woman who could write 
so courageously and well, and in whose 
work I recognise a power working for good, 
and eminently calculated to sway the thoughts 
of the people. It is a wonderful gift you 
have — and I do not think you will abuse it. 
There is a magnetism in your pen which will 
influence many. Take care always to do 
your best, and never work in a hurry ! As a 
woman, you are pretty and good ; as a writer, 
be brave and true." 

" Mr. G." was all life and animation 
during his visit, which lasted nearly three 



hours. The conversation touched on a very 
wide range of subjects, on all of which he 
displayed a wonderfully intimate knowledge, 
and everything he said evidently proved of 
the profoundest interest to Miss Marie Corelli, 
the value of his opinions being heightened 
by the characteristic earnestness with which 
his opinions were uttered. This was between 
three and four years ago, and his last words 
to the novelist were : " God bless you, my 
dear child. Be brave. You've got a great 
future before you. Don't lose heart on the 
way. Good-bye." 

As the result of a conversation I have had 
with Miss Marie Corelli on the subject, I am 
glad to be able to assist in giving currency to 
her authoritative denial of the suggestion 
which has been made in the Press that the title 
of her next book will bear the blasphemous 
and revolting title of " The Sins of Christ" 
At the time of writing, this statement has 
been given a publicity which utterly untrue 
statements so often achieve. As I have 
already stated in this interview, seven 
chapters only of her new book are written ; 
it will not be published this year, and no 
title has even been thought of, nor is it ever 
communicated to anyone — even to the most 
intimate friend — before publication. 

There is much more that might well 
be written, but I feel bound to point out that 
Miss Marie Corelli's imperturbable sweetness 
of manner and unfailing good humour 
are the natural outcome of strength of 
character. It is no effort to htr to be kindly, 
charming, and gracious— she is naturally so ; 
and in regretfully bringing the pleasant task 
of writing this article to a conclusion, I prefer 
to do so by quoting a remark which was 
made to me on the first day of my visit to 
Woodhall Spa, by one of those charming, quite 
grown-up, but high-spirited, " quite English : ' 
girls, whom no doubt it is a pleasure to most 
Strand Magazine readers to meet This 
description applies to just the type of girl 
not the least of whose attractions is a 
readiness, even to a disconcerting degree, 
to say what is actually thought ! In reply 
to some references which I had made to 
Miss Corelli, the young lady in question 
exclaimed, " Why, yes; who could help 
loving her? She's so charming — and 
she's so good ! " I doubt if, after much 
thinking, anyone could have epitomized one's 
impression of the famous novelist more 
correctly. 



by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



Tricky Traps, 



By A. Sarathkumar Ghosh, 




|EOPLE do ask such strange 
questions about wild animals, 
One would imagine that tigers 
, and lions prowl about like t:ats 
~S$] in broad daylight in Indian 
and African villages, and cobras 
and pythons coil themselves in gay festoons 
around every door-post and window, and 
even hang from house to house like so many 
telegraph wires. No; wild elephants do not 
run into your compound on high days and 
holidays, and start pulling down your bunga- 
low for the mere fun of the thing. Whole 
herds of rhinoceri do not come charging 
into every railway station, scatter the 
passengers about like chaff before the wind, 
wreck the trains into matchwood, rip up the 
permanent way for hundreds of yards around, 
and chew up all the corrugated iron in the 
establishment 

But apart from these exaggerations, the 
actual devastation committed by wild beasts 
is bad enough in all conscience. We do 
occasionally hear authenticated accounts of 
troops of lions stalking African villages, and 
of man-eating tigers laying a regular siege on 
remote Indian villages, from which 
they carry off scores of victims, till 
some neighbouring English resident 
organizes a hunting expedition, and, 
like a knight of old, rids these unfor- 
tunate people of their terrible foes. 
In fact, official statistics for British 
India alone show that about 21,000 
people and 90,000 domestic animals 
are killed there every year by wild 
beasts. Whether the condition of 
things is any better in other 
countries it is impossible to say, as 
there are no Statistics to be had. 
It certainly can be no worse. 

Of course the natives do not 
always submit tamely .to these 
terrible depredations. Without actu- 
ally waging a perpetual warfare with 
these dread savages, which they 
could not, for the want of firearms, 
they yet have recourse to various 
stratagems to kill or capture their 
foes in a manner at once effective 
and ingenious. Luckily, most wild 
beasts are kinds of idiots, besides 
being greedy and obstinate. So the 
methods employed against them are 
all very simple, and some extremely 
ludicrous, as the following will show, 



Bears are to be found throughout Asia, 
from the hill districts of India right up to 
the snows of Siberia ; and though not so 
fierce or strung as tigers, they are, neverthe- 
less, very formidable foes to encounter when 
pressed by hunger. They are in one respect 
worse than tigers, because an unarmed man 
can always escape from a tiger by climbing a 
tree, whereas he could not thus elude a bear, 
who is an expert climber. Hence, if a 
bear is found prowling near a village, the 
people sometimes adopt for his destruction a 
method which is almost mathematical in its 
principle. They select a tree with a strong 
horizontal bough some 12ft. or 15ft. from the 
ground, and place on it— about 8fL or 10ft. 
from the fork— something which is likely to 
tempt the bear, *,£-,, honey or goat-flesh. Just 
above this bait, and about a foot in front of 
it, they suspend a heavy weight by means of 
a stout rope attached to a bough overhead, 
thus forming a huge pendulum with its bulb 
covering the bait. The bear, allured by the 
bait, climbs the tree and walks along the bough 
to the bait, Noticing, however, the obstacle^ he 
pushes it aside with his paw. But, alas ! the 




by Google 



A LLC RE J BV THE BAIT* 



Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 






28 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 




"the weight swings back/' 

bear has no knowledge of mechanics, 
and suffers in consequence, for the 
weight swings back and strikes him 
heavily. With a savage growl at this 
u n warrantable 
assau It j he pushes 
it away with 
greater force than 
before, only to re- 
ceive a severer 
blow. And so this 
suicidal contest 
goes on — for the 
bear is too obsti- 
nate and deter- 
mined a foe to 
give in — till he is 
knocked off the 
tree stunned and 
desperately 
wounded, when 
the natives come 
and finish him off 
if necessary. 

The following 
plan is often 
adopted in Africa 
— and in India by domes and pariahs \ the 
lowest castes among the people— for killing 
pythons and other large snakes : When the 
villagers notice a 
snake of this kind 
in the neighbour- 
hood, they bore a 
small hole, some 
6in. in diameter, 
at the foot of the 
wall that usually 
surrounds their 
village. On the 
outer side of the 
wall, and just op- 




knocked OFP THE TREE 



posite the hole, they tie up a pig ; and, 
similarly, one on the inner side. The 
python comes, sees the first pig, and 
swallows it \ then noticing through the hole 
that there is another pig on the other side, 
puts its head through and swallows that 
also. Now, there is a fine fixture ; for pig 
No. t is in that part of the body which is 
outside the wall, and pig No, z in the part 
within the wall, and neither Is small enough 
to go through the hole. Hence the greedy 
python is unable to advance or to retreat, 
and lies at the mercy of the natives, 

If, however, it is thought undesirable to 
bore a hole in the wall, or if the village be 
without one, then the arrangement is some- 
what different In such a case the villagers 
drive into the ground a number of stout 
wooden stakes, about 6in. apart, in the form 
of a square, say 4ft. or 5ft. each way, and 
about as much high. Then they place a 

pig inside, and 
bind the tops to- 
gether with cross- 
beams. The whole 
structure thus 
forms a miniature 
hut with the pig 
w i t It. i n . T h e 
python enters be- 
tween the bars, 
eats the pig, and 
is unable to get 
out again. 

This latter 
method has an 
additional advan- 
tage over the 
former ; for it 
costs only one pig 
to kill a python, 
whereas in the 
case of boring a 
hole in the wall, 
two are needed, one on the inside and 
the other outside. But then {I have been 
told in confidence) in either case, the pig 




A FIN* FIXTUKB. 



by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



TMICKY TJ?APS. 



29 



or pigs, though dead, are not entirely lost 
to the villagers — // the python he cut open 
in time I One cannot, however, be quite 
sure about this ; it may be only a libel 
on the villagers. Besides, in eating the 
python, they virtually eat the pig. For, as 
the negro slave in America, when accused by 
his master of surreptitiously eating his chicken, 
replied, " Massa has less chicken, but he ha^, 
more niggah ! ,J 

In certain cases, however, the methods 
employed for the destruction of wild animals 
are automatic, and do not need any subse- 
quent intervention on the part of the natives 
themselves. For instance, in some places 
which are infested with wolves and bears— 
e.g., Russia, Siberia, Central Asia, etc* — the 



and a stout arrow is arranged on it in such a 
manner that the string of the bow will be 
released and the arrow shot out with great 
force on pulling a trigger (as in a cross-bow). 
Then a quantity of flesh, or anything else 
which makes a suitable bait, is placed 
directly in front of the arrow and tied by a 
cord to the trigger In order to prevent the 
animal from getting at the bait sideways, or 
from discharging the arrow in any illegitimate 
manner, stakes arc driven into the ground on 
all sides, except in front. Hence, when the 
animal comes, it sees the opening in front of 
the inclosure and the bait temptingly placed 
there, snatches at it, and receives the arrow 
full in its breast, 

Monkeys are a great nuisance in certain 




THE BAIT. 



people take a number of pliable fish-bones 
about 3m, long, sharpen the two ends, and 
then, bending them in the form of hairpins, 
embed them in pieces of fat, which they 
scatter on the ground outside their village. 
The wolves and bears come in search of 
food, and swallow these pieces of fat with 
avidity. When pressed by hunger, they do 
not stop to chew them, but gulp them down 
wholesale, and thus swallow the curved fish- 
bones as well When, however, the heat of 
the stomach melts the fat, these fish-bones 
spring back into their original position and 
transfix the animals internally, thereby causing 
death in most cases. This seems rather a 
cruel method of killing animals ; but the 
natives justify it on the ground that it is a 
safe and easy way of getting rid of a large 
number of these savage beasts. 

Another automatic method is sometimes 
employed when it is intended to operate 
against some individual animal, e.g., a tiger 
or a lion, which is seen prowling about the 
outskirts of the village. A strong bow is 
fixed in position about 2ft. from the ground, 



by Google 



parts of India, They are a bad lot altogether, 
being thieves and liars of the worst sort. I 
mean they are liars in this respect, that they 
will come up to you with the merriest 
and friendliest of grins just when they 
are contemplating the wickedest of rob- 
beries. And yet they may be seen in 
many a town, squatting on the roofs of 
temples, grinning at the worshippers that 
pass to and fro, and receiving a handsome 
fargesse in the shape of nuts, bananas, and 
brinjals. Occasionally, one more mischievous 
and dishonest than the rest will creep down 
to the stall of some sleeping fruiterer, grab a 
handful of delicacies, and be off to a neigh- 
bouring roof — followed by a torrent of vain 
curses from the injured owner. Curiously 
enough, the natives will never kill a monkey ; 
it is a semi-sacred animal, often maintained 
in luxury in the environments of the holiest 
temples. 

The fact is, there is a legend that 
Hunuman, the king of monkeys, once helped 
Rama {one of the avatars of Vishnu) to 
conquer a great demon. Consequently, the 

Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



30 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE, 



monkey is permitted to remain what he always 
was — a pampered thief and a general nuisance, 
I remember the case of a tame monkey, 
owned by a waggish ganja (hemp) smoker. 
One day the monkey was made blindly, 
speechlessly intoxicated, and sent staggering 
into the roadway, amid a crowd of yelling, 

jeering but, really, I am forgetting. This 

is not a story, 

So monkeys are an unmitigated nuisance 
— especially in the country, I have often 
come across in the jungles adjoining the 
villages of Northern Bengal whole troops of 
them, whose depredations on the fields and 
orchards were the despair of the unfortunate 
villagers. These troops always consisted of 
one huge male and about a hundred females. 
The fact is, when a little monkey is born in 
the pack, it is suffered to live if a female, but 
instantly killed by the father if it happens to 
be a male. The mother, however* some- 
times manages to hide the little one till 
he is able to get about, and then send him 
away before the big male catches sight 
of him. In this way, it often happens 
that individual males are to be found living 
by themselves in single blessedness. Now, 
getting tired of solitude after a time, and 
perhaps believing in union as a source of 
strength, these bachelors often join together 
and form a pack of their own— as a sort of a 
club. Then the fun begins. They want 
wives — very naturally, But how are they to 
get them ? All the female monkeys of the 
country belong to the harem of some big brute 
or other. Clearly, the only solution is to 
attack such a harem, kill the goiha {the afore- 
said big brute), 
and then divide 
the spoils. So 
an ultimatum is 
sent — and re- 
jected. War is 
declared. The 
battle is a fierce 
one and often 
lasts several 
days. The party 
attacked always 
tries to retreat, 
and often tra- 
verses several 
jungles, fields, 
and even vil- 
lages. But the 
pursuit is hot 
and vigorous, 
and a last stand 
has to be made « A TEMPTING „anak A .* 



— sometimes in a village green or even an 
orchard of some country mansion. In the 
actual fight the females generally remain 
faithful to their lord and master, and help 
him fiercely against his numerous assailants. 
But the result is a foregone conclusion, and 
the several widows, after a very short period 
of mourning— usually manifested by a show 
of ill^temper — are consoled by the victorious 
males. 

Now, these battles cause sad havoc to the 
fields and orchards of the country, and often 
prove a positive danger to the people ; for, 
though monkeys seldom attack men, woe to 
the luckless one who ventures to come near 
them in their deadly struggle. Moreover, 
when pressed by hunger these packs are not 
to he trifled with. You may not mind even 
the damage done to your orchard by hundreds 
of monkeys gobbling up everything they 
could lay their hands on, but it is quite a 
different matter when you have to shut your 
doors and windows, and stay in for days at a 
time, because of the army outside.* 

Consequently, the object of the natives is 
to break up these packs by capturing their 
leaders. Killing is against the dictates of 
conscience, but capture is not, especially as 
the monkey is liberated in a short time — as 
will appear presently. So when a pack is 
about, the natives employ the following 
method. 

Close to an orchard, a bit of level space 
is selected and a hole dug in it, about aft 
deep and 6in, or Sin. in diameter, A noose 
is made at one end of a long stout cord, and 
placed over the mouth of the hole. The 




cord is then passed 
through a pulley 
ring attached to a 
tree close to the 
house f and the other end held, 
some distance away, by a con- 
cealed person. The noose and 

* The wriier himself has bad to stami 
such a siege in an isolated mansion, 



by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



TRICKY TRAPS, 



3i 



about 1 oft- or 15ft. 
of the cord are 
covered over with 
sand. Then a nice 
tempting banana is 
placed in the hole, 
and a number of 
rotten ones- 
covered) however, 
with fresh skins — 
are strewn all over 
the ground near the 
hole. 

When the pack 
comes, the females 
are too shy to ven- 
ture out into the 
open space near the 
house. But the big 
got ha is a brave 
fellow. He sees the 
bananas on the 
ground, leaps down, 
takes up one — 
throws it away in 
disgust. Then 
another — with the 
same result. Sud- 
denly he notices the nice 
tempting one in the hole 
and plunges his arm in — 
immediately the cord is 
pulled, the noose fastened 
on the arm close to the 
shoulder, and the monkey 
dragged willy-nilly to the 
tree where the 
pulley, or ring, 
is attached. 
Then the hiding 
shikari comes 
forth, and, cir- 
cling round and 
round the tree 
with the cord 
held tight in his 
hand, binds the 
unfortunate 
monkey safe 
and fast, all but 
the head. The 
pulley or ring is 
introduced not 
merely to bind 
the monkey to 
the tree, but also 
because it would 
be highly dan- 
gerous to drag 




the infuriated 
brute right up to a 
person. 

The monkey, 
however, is not 
killed, Instead, they 
lather his head and 
face, no special care 
being taken in 
selecting the finest 
soap or the purest 
water. The opera- 
tion is an interest- 



ing one, 



and 



THEY LATHfcH Hlft HEAD AND KACL". 










" DISOWNED 1' 



source of great 
amusement—to the 
bystanders. The 
monkey, however, 
dodges his head 
about, only to get 
a good dose of soap 
into his eyes and 
mouth. Then he 
has enough of it, 
especially as he feels 
dreadfully achy all 
over, and the cords 
cutting into his body 
every inch — to say nothing 
of the personal remarks 
and the highly adjectival 
language of the bystanders. 
He -ubmits to his fate with 
K astern stoicism. His head 
is shaved clean as a billiard 
ball, and the face as well, 
nice and smooth 
like a baby's. 
Then they let 
him go. 

But, alas ! 
such is the 
vanity of life ! 
His wives will 
not have him 
now that his 
beauty is gone ! 
They disown 
him completely; 
cut him dead. 
Nay, they drive 
him away from 
the x>aek with 
contumely, with 
the end of their 
tails — in the 
absence of 
domestic 
broomsticks. 



by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



3* 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



And thus, being without a leader, the pack 
is soon broken up. 

Of all methods, however, employed for the 
actual destruction of wild animals, the follow- 
ing will perhaps bear away the palm, if one 
considers the grand result obtained and the 
ludicrous means adopted to obtain it Fancy 
"catching tigers with bird-lime !" 

It does seem a sensational heading, but 
nevertheless it is quite true. This is the way 
it is done. In some parts of Northern India, 
when informa- 
tion is received 
in a village that 
a tiger has been 
seen in the 
neighbourhood, 
the natives 
gather a large 
quantity of 
leaves from a 
particular kind 
of tree which 
grows in that 
part of the 
country ; these 
leaves are about 
6in, or Sin. in 
diameter, and 
very thick and 
tough. Now, 
there is another 
kind of tree the 
sap of which, 
when prepared, 
makes a very 
sticky paste. The 
natives smear 
the leaves with 
this paste, and 
strew the groun'd 
with them very 
close together 
for a radius of 
some 50ft. 
around a tall 
tree, taking care 

that the paste is on the upper surface of 
the leaves, Then they tie a quantity of 
flesh on a bough of the tree some t 2ft. 
from the ground, and watch the development 
of events from a safe distance, The tiger 
scents the flesh, comes up to the tree and 
makes a spring for it. He naturally misses it ; 
for a tiger cannot as a rule leap more than ioft 




IN MCS.RHAI1T.E HLIt'.IIT. 



vertically, though he can cover at a single 
bound some 40ft. horizontally. He then tries 
again — with the same result. Now, perhaps, 
he begins to notice that his paws are covered 
with the leaves, and naturally desires to rid 
himself of these incumbrances before trying 
again ; or else he does not mind them at firsts 
but goes on trying, till they accumulate more 
and more, and become a positive nuisance. 
He then wipes his paws on the ground— only 
to gather a few more leaves. Then he wipes 

his paws on his 
body, with the 
result that he 
transfers the 
leaves to the 
body ; and as 
soon as he puts 
his paws down 
again he catches 
up some more 
leaves from the 
ground. In this 
way the leaves 
go on piling all 
over the body 
till they get to 
the face and 
head. This is 
done all the 
more easily, be- 
cause all animals 
of the cat tribe 
have the habit 
of wiping their 
paws on their 
face. Now t when 
the paste gets to 
the eyes, it 
causes a severe 
pain w h i c h 
drives the tiger 
frantic. In his 
blundering stu- 
pidity he rolls on 
the ground to 
free himself from 
this horrid nuisance, but with the only result 
that he covers himself more and more — till, 
blinded and maddened, he leaps about 
frantically, and dashes his head against 
some tree. Helpless, in his miserable plight, 
he then falls an easy victim to the wily 
natives, who emerge from their hiding-place^ 
and finish him off with many a spear-thrust 



by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



Round the Fire. 



II.— THE STORY OF THE MAN WITH THE WATCHES. 

By A. Conan Doyle. 



" * 



HERE are many who will still 
bear in mind the singular cir- 
cumstances which, under the 
heading of the Rugby Mystery, 
filled many columns of the 
daily Press in the spring of 
the year 1X92. Coming as it did at a period 
of exceptional dulness, it attracted perhaps 
rather more attention than it deserved, but it 
offered to the public that mixture of the 
whimsical and the tragic which is most 
stimulating to the popular imagination. 
Interest drooped, however, when, after weeks 
of fruitless investigation, it was found that 
no final explanation of 
the facts was forth- 
coming, and the tra- 
gedy seemed from that 
time to the present to 
have finally taken its 
place in the dark 
catalogue of inexplic- 
able and unexpiated 
crimes. A recent 
communication (the 
authenticity of which 
appears to be above 
question) has, how- 
ever, thrown some 
new and clear light 
upon the matter. 
Before laying it before 
the public it would 
be as well, perhaps, 
that I should refresh 
their memories as to 
the singular facts 
upon which this com- 
mentary is founded. 
These facts were 
briefly as follows : — 

At five o'clock upon 
the evening of the 
1 8th of March in the 
year already men- 
tioned a train left 
Euston Station for 
M a nch este r It was 
a rainy, squally day, 
which grew wilder as 

it progressed, so it was by no means" the 
weather in which anyone would travel who 
was not driven to do so by necessity. The 
train, however, is a favourite one among 

VqL nvi.— 6 Copyright, 1896 

ligilizedbyGoSgie 



Manchester business men who are returning 
from town, for it does the journey in four 
hours and twenty minutes, with only three 
stoppages upon the way. In spite of the 
inclement evening it was, therefore, fairly 
well filled upon the occasion of which I 
speak. The guard of the train was a tried 
servant of the company — a man who had 
worked for twenty-two years without blemish 
or complaint. His name was John Palmer, 

The station clock was upon the stroke of 
five, and the guard was about to give the 
customary signal to the engine-driver, when 
he observed two belated passengers hurrying 

down the platform. 
The one was an ex- 
ceptionally tall man, 
dressed in a long black 
overcoat with an astra- 
khan collar and cuffs. 
I have already said 
that the evening was 
an inclement one, and 
the tall traveller had 
the high, warm collar 
turned up to protect 
his throat against the 
bitter March wind. 
He appeared, as far 
as the guard could 
judge by so hurried 
an inspection, to be a 
man between fifty and 
sixty years of age, who 
had retained a good 
deal of the vigour and 
activity of his youth. 
In one hand he carried 
a brown leather (Glad- 
stone bag. His com- 
panion was a lady, 
tall and erect, walking 
with a vigorous step 
which outpaced the 
gentleman beside hen 
She wore a long, 
fawn - coloured dust- 
cloak, a black, close- 
fitting toque, and a 
dark veil which 
concealed the greater part of her face* 
The two might very well have passed as 
father and daughter They walked swiftly 
down the line of carriages, glancing in at the 

Copyright, 1896, by UcQi-ge Newne^ Lftftftgjj p 3 1 from 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 




TJtK TWO MIGHT VKKV WELL HAVE |>ASSKl> AS 
FATHER ANti hAL'GHTKIL 11 



34 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



v ' 



windows, until the guard, John Palmer, over- 
took them, 

il Now, then, sir, look sharp, the train is 
going," said he- 

" First-class^" the man answered. 

The guard turned the handle of the 
nearest door. In the carriage, which he had 
opened, there sat a small man with a cigar in 
his mouth* His appearance seems to have 
^ impressed itself upon the guard's memory, 
for he was prepared, afterwards, to describe 
or to identify him. He was a man of thirty- 
four or thirty- five years of age, dressed in 
some grey material, sharp nosed, alert, with 
a ruddy, weather-beaten face, and a small, 
closely cropped black beard. He glanced up 
as the door was opened. The tall man 
paused with his foot upon the step. 

"This is a smoking compartment The 




"HE GJ r AKCED Ul* AS THE DOOR W^Ai OMENED, 



lady dislikes smoke," said he, looking round 
at the guard. 

11 All right ! Here you are, sir ! " said 
John Palmer, He slammed the door of the 
smoking carriage, opened that of the next 
one, which was empty, and thrust the two 

Digitized by LiOOQ IC 



travellers in. At the same moment he 
sounded his whistle, and the wheels of the 
train began to move. The man with the 
cigar was at the window of his carriage, and 
said something to the guard as he rolled 
past him, but the words were lost in the 
bustle of the departure. Palmer stepped 
into the guard's van as it came up to him, 
and thought no more of the incident. 

Twelve minutes after its departure the 
train reached Willesden Junction, where it 
stopped for a very short interval An exami- 
nation of the tickets has made it certain that 
no one either joined or left it at this time, 
and no passenger was seen to alight upon the 
platform. At 5.14 the journey to Manchester 
was resumed, and Rugby was reached at 6.50, 
the express being five minutes late. 

At Rugby the attention of the station 

officials was drawn 
to the fact that the 
door of one of the 
first -class carriages 
was open. An 
examination of that 
com par t m e n t , and 
of its neighbour 
disclosed a remark- 
able state of affairs. 
The smoking 
carriage in which 
the short, red -faced 
man with the black 
beard had been 
seen w T as now empty* 
Save for a half- 
smoked cigar, there 
was no trace what- 
ever of its recent 
occupant. The 
door of this car- 
riage was fastened. 
In the next com- 
partment, to which 
attention had been 
originally drawn, 
there was no sign 
either of the gentle- 
man with the astra- 
khan collar or of 
the young lady who 
accompanied him. 
All three passengers 
the other hand, 
the floor of this 



On 



had disappeared 
there was found upon 
carriage — the one in which the tall traveller 
and the lady had been — a young man, 
fashionably dressed and of elegant appear- 
ance. He lay with his knees drawn up, and 
Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



ROUND THE FIRE. 



35 



his head resting against the 
further door, an elbow upon 
either seat. A bullet had 
penetrated his heart, and his 
death must hiive been instan- 
taneous. No one had seen 
such a man enter the train, 
and no railway ticket was 
found in his packet, nor were 
there any markings upon his 
linen, nor papers or personal 
property which might help to 
identify him, Who he was 
whence he had come, and 
how he had met his end were 
each as great a mystery as 
what had occurred to the 
three people who had started 
an hour and a half before 
from Willesden in those two 
compartments. 

I have said that there was 
no personal property which 
might help to identify him T 
but it is true that there was 
one peculiarity about this 
unknown young man which 
was much commented upon at 
the time. In his pockets were 
found no fewer than si?c valu- 
able gold watches, three in the various 
pockets of his waistcoat, one in his ticket- 
pocket, one in his breast - pocket, and 
one small one set in a leather strap and 
fastened round his left wrist The obvious 
explanation that the man was a pick-pocket, 
and that this was his plunder, was discounted 
by the Fact that all six were of American make, 
and of a type which is rare in England. 
Three of them bore the mark of the 
Rochester Watchmaking Company ; one was 
by Mason, of Elmira ; one was unmarked ; and 
the small one, which was highly jewelled and 
ornamented, was from Tiffany, of New York, 
The other contents of his pocket consisted 
of an ivory knife with a corkscrew by Rodgers, 
of Sheffield ; a small circular mirror, one inch 
in diameter; a re-admission slip to the Lyceum 
theatre ; a silver box full of vesta matches, and 
a brown leather cigar-case containing two 
cheroots — also two pounds fourteen shillings 
in money. It was clear then that what- 
ever motives may have led to his death, 
robbery was not among them. As already 
mentioned, there were no markings upon 
the man's linen, which appeared to be new, 
and no tailor's name upon his coat. In 
appearance he was young, short, smooth 
cheeked, and delicately featured. One of his 

Digitized by G»< 




A BUE-LfcT HAP I'ENETKATfcn HIS HEART, 



front teeth was conspicuously stopped with 
gold. 

On the discovery of the tragedy an exami- 
nation was instantly made of the tickets of 
all passengers, and the number of the 
passengers themselves was counted. It was 
found that only three tickets w r ere unac- 
counted for, corresponding to the three 
travellers who were missing, The express 
was then allowed to proceed, but a new guard 
was sent with it, and John Palmer was 
detained as a witness at Rugby. The carriage 
which included the two compartments in 
question was uncoupled and side- tracked. 
Then, on the arrival of Inspector Vane, 
of Scotland Yard, and of Mr. Hender- 
son, a detective in the service of the railway 
company, an exhaustive inquiry was made 
into all the circumstances. 

That crime had been committed was cer- 
tain. The bullet* which appeared to have 
come from a small pistol or revolver, had 
been fired from some little distance, as there 
was no scorching of the clothes. No weapon 
was found in the compartment {which finally 
disposed of the theory of suicide), nor was 
there any sign of the brown leather bag 
which the guard had seen in the hand of the 
tall gentleman. A lady's parasol was found 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



36 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



upon the rack, but no other trace was to 
be seen of the travellers in either of the 
sections, Apart from the crime, the question 
of how or why three passengers (one of them 
a lady) could get out of the train, and one 
other get in during the unbroken run between 
Willesden and Rugby, was one which excited 
the utmost curiosity among the general public, 
and gave rise to much speculation in the 
London Press. 

John Palmer, the guard, was able at the 
inquest to give .some evidence which threw a 
little light upon the matter. There was 
a spot between Tring and Cheddington, 
according to his statement, where, on account 
of some repairs to the line, the train had for 
a few minutes slowed down to a pace not 
exceeding eight or ten miles an hour. At 
that place it might be possible fur a man, or 
even for an exceptionally active woman, to 
have left the train without serious injury. It 
was true that a gang of platelayers was there, 



screen anyone who sprang out from the 
observation of the navvies. 

The guard also deposed that there was a 
good deal of movement upon the platform at 
Willesden Junction, and that though it was 
certain that no one had either joined or left 
the train there, it was still quite possible that 
some of the passengers might have changed 
unseen from one compartment to another. 
It was by no means uncommon for a gentle- 
man to finish his cigar in a smoking carriage 
and then to change to a clearer atmosphere. 
Supposing that the man with the black beard 
had done so at Willesden (and the half smoked 
cigar upon the floor seemed to favour the 
supposition^ he would naturally go into the 
nearest section, which would bring him into 
the company of the two other actors in this 
drama. Thus the first stage of the affair 
might be surmised without any great breach 
of probability* But what the second stage 
had been, or how the final one had been 




^ 



A GANG OF HLATELAVEHS WAS TllEKE/ 



and that they had seen nothing, but it was 
their custom to stand in the middle between 
the metals, and the open carriage door was 
upon the far side, so that it was conceivable 
that someone might have alighted unseen, as 
the darkness would by that time be drawing 
in. A steep embankment would instantly 



by Google 



arrived at, neither the guard nor the 
experienced detective officers could suggest. 

A careful examination of the line between 
Willesden and Rugby resulted in one dis- 
covery which might or might not have a 
bearing upon the tragedy. Near Tring, at 
the very place where the train slowed down, 
Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



ROUND THE FIRE. 



37 



there was found at the bottom of the embank- 
ment a small pocket Testament, very shabby 
and worn. It was printed by the Bible Society 
of London, and bore an inscription : " From 
John to Alice. Jan. 13th, 1856," upon the 
fly-leaf. Underneath was written : " James. 
July 4th, 1859," and beneath that again : 
"Edward. Nov. 1st, 1869," all the entries 
being in the same handwriting. This was 
the only clue, if it could be called a clue, 
which the police obtained, and the coroner's 
verdict of '* Murder by a person or persons 
unknown " was the unsatisfactory ending of 
a singular case. Advertisement, rewards, 
and inquiries proved equally fruitless, and 
nothing could be found which was solid 
enough to form the basis for a profitable 
investigation. 

It would be a mistake, however, to sup- 
pose that no theories were formed to account 
for the facts. On the contrary, the Press, 
both in England and in America, teemed with 
suggestions and suppositions, most of which 
were obviously absurd. The fact that the 
watches were of American make, and some 
peculiarities in connection with the gold 
stopping of his front tooth, appeared to indi- 
cate that the deceased was a citizen of the 
United States, though his linen, clothes, and 
boots were undoubtedly of British manufac- 
ture. It was surmised, by some, that he was 
concealed under the seat, and that, being 
discovered, he was for some reason, possibly 
because he had overheard their guilty 
secrets, put to death by his fellow - pas r 
sengers. When coupled with generalities 
as to the ferocity and cunning of anarchical 
and other secret societies, this theory sounded 
as plausible as any. 

The fact that he should be without a ticket 
would be consistent with the idea of conceal- 
ment, and it was well known that women 
played a prominent part in the Nihilistic 
propaganda. On the other hand, it was 
clear, from the guards statement, that the 
man must have been hidden there before 
the others arrived, and how unlikely the 
coincidence that conspirators should stray 
exactly into the very compartment in which 
a spy was already concealed ! Besides, this 
explanation ignored the man in the smoking 
carriage, and gave no reason at all for his 
simultaneous disappearance. The police had 
little difficulty in showing that such a theory 
would not cover the facts, but they were 
unprepared in the absence of evidence to 
advance any alternative explanation. 

There was a letter in the Daily Gazette, 
over the signature of a well-known criminal 

Digitized by GoOglC 



investigator, which gave rise to considerable 
discussion at the time. He had formed a 
hypothesis which had at least ingenuity to 
recommend it, and I cannot do better than 
append it in his own words. 

" Whatever may be the truth," said he, " it 
must depend upon some bizarre and rare 
combination of events, so we need have no 
hesitation in postulating such events in our 
explanation. In the absence of data we 
must abandon the analytic or scientific 
method of investigation, and must approach 
it in the synthetic fashion. In a word, 
instead of taking known events and deducing 
from them what has occurred, we must build 
up a fanciful explanation if it will only be 
consistent with known events. We can then 
test this explanation by any fresh facts which 
may arise. If they all fit into their places, 
the probability is that we are upon the right 
track, and with each fresh fact this probability 
increases in a geometrical progression until 
the evidence becomes final and convincing. 

u Now, there is one most remarkable and 
suggestive fact which has not met with the 
attention which it deserves. There is a 
local train running through Harrow and 
King's Langley, which is timed in srch a way 
that the express must have overtaken it at or 
about the period when it eased down its 
speed to eight miles an hour on account of 
the repairs of the line. The two trains would 
at that time be travelling in the same 
direction at a similar rate of speed and upon 
parallel lines. It is within everyone's experi- 
ence how, under such circumstances, the occu- 
pant of each carriage can see very plainly the 
passengers in the other carriages opposite to 
him. The lamps of the express had been lit 
at Willesden, so that each compartment was 
brightly illuminated, and most visible to an 
observer from outside. 

"Now, the sequence of events as I re- 
construct them would be after this fashion. 
This young man with the abnormal number 
of watches was alone in the carriage of the 
slow train. His ticket, with his papers and 
gloves and other things, was, we will suppose, 
on the seat beside him. He was probably an 
American, and also probably a man of weak 
intellect. The excessive wearing of jewellery 
is an early symptom in some forms of mania. 

" As he sat watching the carriages of the 
express which were (on account of the state 
of the line) going at the same pace as himself, 
he suddenly saw some people in it whom he 
knew. We will suppose for the sake of our 
theory that these people were a woman whom 
he loved and a man whom he hated — and 



.^1 1 u 1 1 1 a 1 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



38 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



who in return hated him. The young man 
was excitable and impulsive. He opened 
the door of his carriage, stepped from the 
footboard of the local train to the footboard 
of the express, opened the other door, and 
made his way into the presence of these two 
people. The feat (on the supposition that 
the trains were going at the same pace) is by 
no means so perilous as it might appear. 

" Having now got our young man without 
his ticket into the carriage in which the elder 
man and the young woman are travelling, it 
is not difficult to imagine that a violent scene 
ensued. It is possible that the pair were 
also Americans, which is the more probable 
as the man carried a weapon — an unusual 
thing in England. If our supposition of 
incipient mania is correct, the young man is 
likely to have assaulted the other. As the 
upshot of the quarrel the elder man shot the 
intruder, and then made his escape from 
the carriage, taking the young lady with him. 
We will suppose that all this happened very 
rapidly, and that the train was still going at 
so slow a pace that it was not difficult for 
them to leave it. A woman might leave a 
train going at eight miles an hour. As a 
matter of fact, we know that this woman did 
do so. 

" And now we have to fit in the man in 
the smoking carriage. Presuming that we 
have, up to this point, reconstructed the 
tragedy correctly, we shall find nothing in 
this other man to cause us to reconsider our 
conclusions. According to my theory, this 
man saw the young fellow cross from one 
train to the other, sa% him open the door, 
heard the pistol-shot, saw the two fugitives 
spring out on to the line, realized that 
murder had been done, and sprang out him- 
self in pursuit. Why he has never been 
heard of since — whether he met his own 
death in the pursuit, or whether, as is more 
likely, he was made to realize that it was not 
a case for his interference — is a detail which 
we have at present no means of explaining. 
I acknowledge that there are some difficulties 
in the way. At first sight, it might seem 
improbable that at such a moment a 
murderer would burden himself in his flight 
with a brown leather bag. My answer is that 
he was well aware that if the bag were found 
his identity would be established. It was 
absolutely necessary for him to take it with 
him. My theory stands or falls upon one 
point, and I call upon the railway company 
to make strict inquiry as to whether a ticket 
was found unclaimed in the local train 
through Harrow and King's I^angley upon 



the 1 8th of March. If such a ticket were found 
my case is proved. If not, my theory may 
still be the correct one, for it is conceivable 
either that he travelled without a ticket or 
that his ticket was lost" 

To this elaborate and plausible hypothesis 
the answer of the. police and of the com- 
pany was, first, that no such ticket was 
found ; secondly, that the slow train 
would never run parallel to the express ; 
and, thirdly, that the local train had been 
stationary in King's Langley Station when 
the express, going at fifty miles an hour, had 
flashed past it. So perished the only satis- 
fying explanation, and five years have elapsed 
without supplying a new one. Now, at last, 
there comes a statement which covers all the 
facts, and which must be regarded as 
authentic. It took the shape of a letter 
dated from New York, and addressed to the 
same criminal investigator whose theory I 
have quoted. It is given here in extenso, 
with the exception of the two opening 
paragraphs, which are personal in their 
nature : — 

" You'll excuse me if I am not very free 
with names. There's less reason now than 
there was five years ago when mother was 
still living. But for all that, I had rather 
cover up our tracks all I can. But I owe 
you an explanation, for if your idea of it was 
wrong, it was a mighty ingenious one all the 
same. I'll have to go back a little so as you 
may understand all about it. 

il My people came from Bucks, England, 
and emigrated to the States in the early fifties. 
They settled in Rochester, in the State of 
New York, where my father ran a large dry 
goods store. There were only two sons : 
myself, James, and my brother, Edward. I 
was ten years older than my brother, and 
after my father died I sort of took the place 
of a father to him, as an elder brother would. 
He was a bright, spirited boy, and just one of 
the most beautiful creatures that ever lived. 
But there was always a soft spot in him, and 
it was like mold in cheese, for it spread and 
spread, and nothing that you could do would 
stop it. Mother saw it just as clearly as I 
did, but she went on spoiling him all the 
same, for he had such a way with him that 
you could refuse him nothing. I did all I 
could to hold him in, and he hated me for 
my pains. 

44 At last he fairly got his head, and nothing 
that we could do would stop him. He got 
off into New York, and went rapidly from bad 
to worse. At first he was only fast, and then 
he was criminal ; and then, at the end of a year 



by LiOOgle 



u I I I '.' I I I 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



ROUND THE FIRE. 



39 



or two, he was one of the most notorious 
young crooks In the city. He had formed a 
friendship with Sparrow MacCoy, who was at 
the head of his profession as a bunco-steerer, 
greeivgoodsman, and general rascal. They 
took to card-sharping, and frequented some 
of the best hotels in New York. My brother 
was an excellent actor (he might have made 
an honest name 
for himself if he 
had chosen), and 
he would take the 
parts of a young 
Englishman of 
title, of a simple 
lad from the West, 
or of a college 
undergraduate, 
whichever suited 
Sparrow MacCoy's 
purpose. And 
then one day he 
dressed himself as 
a girl, and he 
carried it off so 
well, and made 
himself such a 
valuable decoy, 
that it was their 
favorite game 
afterwards. They 
had made it right 
with Tammany 
and with the 
police, so it 
seemed as if noth- 
ing could ever 
stop them, for 
those were in the 
days before the 
Lexow Commis- 
sion, and if you 
only had a pull, 
you could do 
pretty nearly anything you wanted, 

"And nothing would have stopped them 
if they had only stuck to cards and New 
York, but they must needs come up Rochester 
way, and forge a name upon a check. 
It was my brother that did it, though every- 
one knew that it was under the influence 
of Sparrow MacCoy, I bought up that 
check, and a pretty sum it cost me. Then 
I went to my brother, laid it before him on 
the table, and swore to him that I would 
prosecute if he did not clear out of the 
country. At first he simply laughed. I 
could not prosecute, he said, without break- 
ing our mother's heart, and he knew that I 




|[K FORMED A FRIENDSHIP WITH SPARROW MACCOV, 



by LiOOglC 



would not do that, I made him understand, 
however, that our mother's heart was being 
broken in any case, and that I had set firm 
on the point that I would rather see him in 
a Rochester gaol than in a New York hotel 
So at last he gave in, and he made me a 
solemn promise that he would see Sparrow 
MacCoy no more, that he would go to Europe, 

and that he would 
turn his hand to 
any honest trade 
that I helped him 
to get, I took him 
down right away 
to an old family 
friend, joe Will- 
son, who is an ex- 
porter of American 
watches and 
clocks, and I got 
him to give 
Edward an agency 
in London, with a 
small salary and a 
5 per cent, com- 
mission on all 
business. His 
manner and ap- 
pearance were so 
good that he won 
the old man over 
at once, and with- 
in a week he was 
sent off to I-ondon 
with a case full of 
samples. 

"It seemed to 
me that this busi- 
ness of the check 
had really given 
my brother a fright, 
and that there 
was some chance 
of his settling 
down into an honest line of life. My mother 
had spoken with him, and what she said had 
touched him, for she had always been the 
best of mothers to him, and he had been the 
great sorrow of her life. But I knew that 
this man Sparrow MacCoy had a great 
influence over Edward, and my chance 
of keeping the lad straight lay in breaking 
the connection between them. I had a 
friend in the New York detective force, and 
through him I kept a watch upon MacCoy, 
When within a fortnight of my brother's 
sailing I heard that MacCoy had taken a 
berth in the Etruria y I was as certain as if 
he had told me that he was going over to 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



40 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



England for the purpose of coaxing Edward 
back again into the ways that he had left, 
In an instant I had resolved to go also, and 
to put my influence against MacCoy's. I 
knew it was a losing fight, but I thought, and 
my mother thought, that it was my duty. 
We passed the last night together in prayer 
for my success, and she gave me her own 
Testament that my father had given her on 
the day of their marriage in the Old Country, 
so that I might always wear it next my heart. 



" ■ Who is it, anyway ? f asked one of 
the dudes. 

M £ He's Sparrow MacCoy, the most notori- 
ous card-sharper in the States/ 

u Up he jumped with a bottle in his hand, 
but he remembered that he was under the 
flag of the effete Old Country, where law and 
order run, and Tammany has no pull. Gaol 
and the gallows wait for violence and murder, 
and there's no slipping out by the back door 
on board an ocean liner, 




' UP HE JUMHED WITH A DOTTLE IN HIS HAND." 



il I was a fellow-traveller, on the steamship, 
with Sparrow MacCoy, and at least I had 
the satisfaction of spoiling his little game for 
the voyage. The very first night I went into 
the smoking-room, and found him at the 
head of a card table, with half-a-dozen young 
fellows who were carrying their full purses 
and their empty skulls over to Europe. He 
was settling down for his harvest, and a rich 
one it would have been. But I soon changed 
all that 

*** Gentlemen/ said I, *are you aware 
whom you are playing with ? ' 

"* What's that to you? You mind your 
own business!' said he, with an oath. 



by ^C 



IC 



** ' Prove your words, you ! ' said he. 

ut I will!' said L ' If* you will turn up 
your right shirt-sleeve to the shoulder, I will 
either prove my words or I will cat them.' 

" He turned white and said not a word. 
You see, I knew something of his ways, and 
I was aware that part of the mechanism 
which he and all such sharpers use consists 
of an elastic down the arm with a clip just 
above the wrist. Is is by means of this clip 
that they withdraw from their hands the 
cards which they do not want, while they 
substitute other cards from another hiding- 
place. I reckoned on it being there, and it 
was. He cursed me, slunk out of the saloon, 

Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



ROUND THE FIRE. 



4i 



and was hardly seen again during the voyage. 
For once, at any rate, I got level with Mister 
Sparrow MacCoy. 

" But he soon had his revenge upon me, 
for when it came to influencing my brother 
he outweighed me every time. Edward had 
kept himself straight in London for the first 
few weeks, and had done some business with 
his American watches, until this villain came 
across his path once more. I did my best, 
but the best was little enough. The next 
thing I heard there had been a scandal at 
one of the Northumberland Avenue hotels : a 
traveller had been fleeced of a large sum by 
two confederate card-sharpers, and the matter 
was in the hands of Scotland Yard. The 
first I learned of it was in the evening paper, 
and I was at once certain that my brother and 
MacCoy were back at their old games. I 
hurried at once to Edward's lodgings. They 
told me that he and a tall gentleman 
(whom I recognised as MacCoy) had gone 
off together, and that he had left the lodgings 
and taken his things with him. The land- 
lady had heard them give several directions 
to the cabman, ending with Euston Station, 
and she had accidentally overheard the tall 
gentleman saying something about Man- 
chester. She believed that that was their 
destination. 

" A glance at the time-table showed me 
that the most likely train was at five, though 
there was another at 4.35 which they might 
have caught. I had only time to get the later 
one, but found no sign of them either at the 
depot or in the train. They must have gone 
on by the earlier one, so I determined to 
follow them to Manchester and search for 
them in the hotels there. One last appeal 
to my brother by all that he owed to my 
mother might even now be the salvation of 
him. My nerves were overstrung, and I lit 
a cigar to steady them. At that moment, 
just as the train was moving off, the door of 
my compartment was flung open, and there 
were MacCoy and my brother on the plat- 
form. 

"They were both disguised, and with good 
reason, for they knew that the London police 
were after them. MacCoy had a great astra- 
khan collar drawn up, so that only his eyes 
and nose were showing. My brother was 
dressed like a woman, with a black veil half 
down his face, but of course it did not deceive 
me for an instant, nor would it have done so 
even if I had not known that he had often 
used such a dress before. I started up, and 
as I did so MacCoy recognised me. He said 
something, the conductor slammed the door, 

Vol xvl--$ 



and they were shown into the next compart- 
ment. I tried to stop the train so as to 
follow them, but the wheels were already 
moving, and it was too late. 

" When we stopped at Willesden, I 
instantly changed my carriage. It appears 
that I was not seen to do so, which is not 
surprising, as the station was crowded with 
people. MacCoy, of course, was expecting 
me, and he had spent the time between 
Euston and Willesden in saying all he could 
to harden my brother's heart and set him 
against me. That is what I fancy, for I had 
never found him so impossible to soften or 
to move. I tried this way and I tried that ; 
I pictured his future in an English gaol ; I 
described the sorrow of his mother when 
I came back with the news ; I said everything 
to touch his heart, but all to no purpose. 
He sat there with a fixed sneer upon his 
handsome face, while every now and then 
Sparrow MacCoy would throw in a taunt at 
me, or some word of encouragement to hold 
my brother to his resolutions. 

" ' Why don't you run a Sunday-school ? ' he 
would say to me, and then, in the same breath : 
* He thinks you have no will of your own. 
He thinks you are just the baby brother and 
that he can lead you where he likes. He's 
only just finding out that you are a man as 
well as he.' 

" It was those words of his which set me 
talking bitterly. We had left Willesden, you 
understand, for all this took some time. My 
temper got the better of me, and for the first 
time in my life I let my brother see the rough 
side of me. Perhaps it would have been 
better had I done so earlier and more 
often. 

" * A man ! ' said I. ' Well, I'm glad to 
have your friend's assurance of it, for no one 
would suspect it to see you like a boarding- 
school missy. I don't suppose in all this 
country there is a more contemptible-looking 
creature than you are as you sit there with 
that Dolly pinafore upon you.' He coloured 
up at that, for he was a vain man, and he 
winced from ridicule. 

" ' It's only a dust-cloak,' said he, and he 
slipped it off. ' One has to throw the 
coppers off one's scent, and I had no other 
way to do it.' He took his toque off with 
the veil attached, and he put both it and the 
cloak into his brown bag. ' Anyway, I don't 
need to wear it until the conductor comes 
round,' said he. 

" * Nor then, either,' said I, and taking 
the bag I slung it with all my force out of 
the window. £ Now,' said I, ' you'll never 
'"'ERSITY Of MICHIGAN 



um 1 



43 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



make a Mary Jane of yourself while I can 
help its, If nothing but that disguise stands 
between you and a gaol, then to gaol you 
shall go/ 

41 That was the way to manage him. I 
felt my advantage at once. His supple 
nature was one which yielded to roughness 
far more readily than to entreaty. He 
flushed with shame, and his eyes filled with 
t^ars. But MaeCoy saw my advantage also, 
and was determined that I should not pursue 
it 

" * He's my pard, and you shall not bully 
him/ he cried. 

** ( He's my brother, and you shall not ruin 
him/ said I. ' I believe a spell of prison is 
the very best way of keeping you apart, and 
you shall have it, or it will be no fault of 



mine. 



Oh, you would squeal, would you ? 3 he 



but his anger against me and my resentment 
towards him had both for the moment been 
swallowed up in this sudden tragedy. It was 
he who first realized the situation. The train 
was for some reason going very slowly at the 
moment, and he saw his opportunity for 
escape. In an instant he had the door open, 
but I was as quick as he, and jumping upon 
him the two of us fell off the foot-board and 
rolled in each others arms down a steep em- 
bankment. At the bottom I struck my head 
against a stone, and I remembered nothing 
more. When I came to myself I was lying 
among some low bushes, not far from the 
railroad track, and somebody was bathing my 
head with a- wet handkerchief. It was 
Sparrow MaeCoy* 

" * I guess I couldn't leave you/ said he, 
* I didn't want to have the blood of two of 
you on my hands in one day, You loved 




> ft 



1i£*& 



*1 fiUKSK | C<Hi"W>N'T I.KAVK VOl'," SAM) JIK.*' 



cried, and in an instant he whipped out his 
revolver I sprang for his hand, but saw 
that I was too late, and jumped aside. At 
the same instant he fired, and the bullet 
which would have struck me passed through 
the heart of my unfortunate brother, 

" He dropped without a groan upon the 
floor of the compartment, and MaeCoy and I, 
equally horrified, knelt at each side of him, 
trying to bring hack some signs of life. Mac- 
Coy still held the loaded revolver in his hand, 

O 



your brother, I've no doubt ; but you didn't 
love him a cent more than I loved him, 
though you'll say that I took a queer w T ay to 
show it. Anyhow, it seems a mighty empty 
world now that he is gone, and I don't care 
a continental whether you give me over to 
the hangman or not. 5 

11 He had turned his ankle in the fall, and 
there we sat, he with his useless foot, and I 
with my throbbing head, and we talked and 
talked until gradually my bitterness began to 

"DIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



ROUND THE FIRE. 



43 



soften and to turn into something like 
sympathy. What was the use of revenging his 
death upon a man who was as much stricken by 
that death as I was ? And then, as my wits 
gradually returned, I began to realize also 
that I could do nothing against MacCoy 
which would not recoil upon my mother and 
myself. How could we convict him without 
a full account of my brother's career being 
made public — the very thing which of all 
others we had to avoid? It was really as 
much our interest as his to cover the 
matter up, and from being an avenger 
of crime I found myself changed to a con- 
spirator against Justice. The place in which 
we found ourselves was one of those pheasant 
preserves which are so common in the Old 
Country, and as we groped our way through it 
I found myself consulting the slayer of my 
brother as to how far it would be possible to 
hush it up. 

" I soon realized from what he said that 
unless there were some papers of which we 
knew nothing in my brother's pockets, there 
was really no possible means by which the 
police could identify him or learn how he had 
got there. His ticket was in MacCoy's pocket, 
and so was the ticket for some baggage 
which they had left at the depot Like 
most Americans, he had found it cheaper and 
easier to buy an outfit in London than to bring 
one from New York, so that all his linen and 
clothes were new and unmarked. The bag, 
containing the dust cloak, which I had 
thrown out of the window, may have fallen 
among some bramble patch where it is still 
concealed, or may have been carried off by 
some tramp, or may have come into the 
possession of the police, who kept the 
incident to themselves. Anyhow, I have 
seen nothing about it in the London papers. 
As to the watches, they were a selection from 
those which had been intrusted to him for 
business purposes. It may have been for the 
same business purposes that he was taking 
them to Manchester, but — well, it's too late 
to enter into that. 

" I don't blame the police for being at 
fault. I don't see how it could have been 



otherwise. There was just one little clew that 
they might have followed up, but it was a 
small one. I mean that small circular mirror 
which was found in my brother's pocket. It 
isn't a very common thing for a young man 
to carry about with him, is it? But a 
gambler might have told you what such a 
mirror may mean to a card-sharper. If you 
sit back a little from the table, and lay the 
mirror, face upwards, upon your lap, you can 
see, as you deal, every card that you 
give to your adversary. It is not hard to 
say whether you see a man or raise him 
when you know his cards as well as your 
own. It was as much a part of a sharper's 
outfit as the elastic clip upon Sparrow 
MacCoy's arm. Taking that, in connection 
with the recent frauds at the hotels, the police 
might have got hold of one end of the string. 

14 1 don't think there is much more for me 
to explain. We got to a village called 
Amersham that night in the character of two 
gentlemen upon a walking tour, and after- 
wards we made our way quietly to Ix>ndon, 
whence MacCoy went on to Cairo and I 
returned to New York. My mother died six 
months afterwards, and I am glad to say that 
to the day of her death she never knew what 
had happened. She was always under the 
delusion that Edward was earning an honest 
livirig in London, and I never had the heart 
to tell her the truth. He never wrote ; but, 
then, he never did write at any time, so that 
made no difference. His name was the last 
upon her lips. 

" There's just one other thing that I have 
to ask you, sir, and I should take it as a kind 
return for all this explanation, if you could 
do it for me. You remember that Testament 
that was picked up. I always carried it in 
my inside pocket, and it must have come out 
in my fall. I value it very highly, for it was 
the family book with my birth and my 
brother's marked by my father in the begin- 
ning of it. I wish you would apply at the 
proper place and have it sent to me. It can 
be of no possible value to anyone else. If 
you address it to X, Bassano's Library, Broad- 
way, New York, it is sure to come to hand." 



by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



A Curious Cure. 

By J, Russell. 

lilustrati&ns from Photographs hy R. D* Roberts 




ROTESQUE as it may ap- 
pear> it is good physic for 
me? concluded my friend^ 
" and I am going back for a 
third dose this summer. Will 
you come ?" 
Experiment and companionship were alike 
attractive; I was said to need a holiday; 
there was a justifying balance at the bank. 
lt I will ! " I cried, and I did ; and this is the 
story of our doings. 

Husbands and wives, we were a party of 
four. For ten pounds odd per head we were 
carried* second-class, and in some forty-eight 
hours, through Paris, Zurich, Innsbruck, and 
Toblach to Villach. Thence, a few shillings 
and a few more hours of train brought us to 
the village of Veldes, Oberkrain, Austria, the 
scene of the experiment — nearly a thousand 
miles from home, barely a hundred from 
the Adriatic, and remote enough from the 
conventionalities of civilization to warrant 
the strange life we were about to lead* 

Veldes, scattered about an idyllic lake, lies 
some thousand feet above sea, amid the 
easternmost undulations of the Julian Alps. 
Away in the west rises the lofty dolomitic 
mass of the Trig lau, and from north to east, 
within easy walking distance, runs the range 
of the rugged Karawanken. A brown river 
brawls through the valley ; tufts of the 
fragrant wild cyclamen scent the woods; 
picturesque white villages, set amidst orchards 
and maize - fields, and teeming with un- 
intelligible peasant children, are dotted about 
the lower slopes of the hills ; beyond stretches 
for miles the solitude of juniper bush and 
pine forest. 

The clear, dry 
atmosphere, some 
supposed virtue in 
the water, and the 
general charm of 
the surroundings 
bring, each sum- 
mer, many a jaded 
Vien n ese to 
Veldes in search 
of sun and air as 
ordinarily pre- 
scribed. But ours 
was a different 
quest The first 
-and every sub- 



sequent — night of our stay, for instance, 
we spent upon the edge of the lake, within 
a few feet of the water, in a couple of rough 
wooden huts without fronts — with some 
forebodings, it must be confessed, although 
it was in August ; but, as we afterwards 
found, with only good effects. 

We had come for a month as the paying 
guests, amongst a hundred others, of a man 
who for thirty years past has been preaching 
— not altogether in the wilderness — the 
healing power of light, sun, and air, applied 
to the body of man as God made it The 
tailor's art, he insists, is anti-hygienic, a source 
of moral and physical degradation. There 
may be occasions for simple covering, but 
there are equally, in the interests^ of whoie- 
someness and vitality, occasions for absence 
of clothing. 

In accordance with the rules of the 
game, therefore, we rose every morning 
soon after five, and having walked, my 
friend and I, to the Hill of Men, our 
wives to the Hill of Women, in the 
scantiest clothing consistent with what is 
called decency, we forthwith spent the 
early hours wandering or reclining in sun or 
shadow, jumping, digging, or reading, accord- 
ing to temperament, and breakfasting on the 
milk, bread, and honey we had brought 
with us from the hut The humours 
of the situation we may leave to the ready 
imagination — they will appeal to every- 
body ; the delights — though our tastes will 
be called in question — we can vouch for out 
of our own experience; the advantages, 
which will be obvious probably to nobody, 




L#'EtelTY OF MICHIGAN 



A CURIOUS CURE. 



45 




UUfc A1H-IIUT AT TiJE WATERS EDGE* 



shall be set forth by the " Doctor," our host, 
in his own words— put into English some 
twenty years ago, and stitl un retracted :— 

" There is no life without air : no health 
without light ... we not only breathe 
through our lungs, but through our skin, 
which contains millions of minute blood- 
vessels thirsting for oxygen, and millions of 
nerves thirsting for light. Where there is 
blood there ought to be air ; where there are 
nerves there ought to be light. , . . The light 
of the sun favours the change of matter; in 
other words* the 
process of life. , ♦ . 
Another beneficial 
influence of the 
air-bath lies in the 
constant changes 
of sunlight and 
shade, heat and 
cold of the atmos- 
phere, by which 
the skin is stimu- 
lated — a stimulus 
that does not 
remain confined to 
the surface of the 
body, but is ex- 
tended, through 
the nerves, to the 
remotest internal 
organs, . , . Thus, 
m opposition to 
the common allo- 
pathic system 
which makes the 
stomach the scape* 



goat of its efforts, the physico- 
hydriatic system effects its cures 
principally through the skin. 
Leaving the internal organs un- 
disturbed, and allowing them to 
perform their functions in peace, 
or to repair damages themselves 
without any direct stimulus on the 
part of thu physician, the alternate 
application of heat and cold on 
the surface of the body produces 
a powerful effect, not only on the 
skin, but through the skin upon 
the vvhole organism in its remotest 
parts. Millions of peripheral 
nerves propagate the impressions 
received to the nervous centres 
and the vital organs j millions of 
capillary vessels discharge the 
effete matter with which they are 
loaded through the pores of the 
skin, and carry the oxygenated 
blood to the interior of the body. No 
poisonous drugs are required to call forth 
a healthy reaction. The vitality of every 
molecule is raised, the strength of the indi 
vidual increased." 

After our strange air-bath on the top of 
the hill, we used to walk back, clothed, to 
another strange bath at the bottom, where, 
for (he best part of an hour, we lay out on a 
slanting roof bare, save for our heads, to 
the full blaze of the sun. Then, for twenty 
minutes by the clock, we were swathed tight 




"VERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



4 6 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 




ON THE HILI, QF MEN— A llRIiAKKAST J*AftTV. 



in our blankets, and then taken indoors, 
plunged into a tub of tepid water, and 
massaged by expert attendants. By the time 
we got back on our bare— and not infre- 
quently tender — feet to the huts, we were 
quite ready for the simple vegetarian mid-day 
meal that awaited us under the huge 
co m m on ciini ng-r oof, 

"The chief object of the light and air 
bath,' 1 to quote for the last time, H is the 
invigoration of the nervous system of the 
whole organism, while the chief object of the 
sun-bath is the purification of the blood, . , , 
The direct effects of the sun upon the skin 
are remarkable : the skin is reddened and 
raised, the capillaries are swelled up, readily 
yidd the effete matter with which they are 
loaded, and greedily imbibe the oxygen of 
the surrounding air, the peripheric circulation 
becomes much improved, stagnations are 
resolved, rheumatic pains relieved, and the 
change of matter 
accelerated, . . . 
It is through the 
complete removal 
of the waste pec- 
cant matter and 
the invigoration of 
the nervous 
system that har- 
mony in the func- 
t ion s of the 
organism is re- 
stored, the body 
as it were rejuven- 
ated. But no 
rejuvenation can 
take place without 
the assistance of 
air, light, water, 



proper diet, and 
exercise. We can- 
not buy health in 
the apothecary's 
shop.' 1 

The virtue of 
strenuous laziness 
during the healing 
time being also 
sternly inculcated 
by the healer, the 
afternoon generally 
opened with deli- 
cious sleep, fol- 
lowed, at the 
option of the 
individual, by 
either a modified 
repetition of the 
morning's airing and sunning, or by a lazy 
stroll with camera or book, Soon after six 
the evening meal of soup, vegetables, and 
sweets was over, and by nine — coffee, 
tobacco, and chatter having achieved their 
purpose — we were generally sleeping our 
Adamic sleep. On the nights when, for the 
purposes of the cure, the body, or some part 
of it, was " packed " in a cold water bandage, 
dreaming was sometimes delayed ; but if that 
particular part of the treatment was distaste- 
ful, you were a free man as soon as the 
attendant's back was turned, 

Though the " Doctor's ** fees are based 
upon sound commercial principles — the 
inclusive charge per month ranging from 
;£i2 to ^15— he has absolute belief in his 
own seriousness. And his numerous patients 
for the most part take him seriously, though 
in varying degrees. The consumptive, for 
instance, who has been to him for fifteen 




iwrarrorfaicHiGAN 



A CURIOUS CURE. 



47 




US THE HllA. OP MEN- 
TATIEWTS AT FLAY. 



successive summers 
and is stil\ alive* takes 
him most seriously ; 
my friend, who is 
returning for the fifth 
time this summer, 
because he finds he 
weathers the winter 
after a month in 
Ye Ides better than 
after a month any- 
where else, takes 
him more (or less) 
seriously ; while I, 
who have been twice 
and still would go— 
partly for the rents it 
patches in the body, 



chiefly for the 
rents it tears in 
the commonplace 
— can hardly be 
said, I suppose, to 
take him not 
seriously. 

Two questions 
will occur to every 
reader: How often 
does it rain, and 
how far off is the 
nearest medical 
man with the 





IN T1IK SUM- BATH, 



A GRIM JOKK. 



orthodox qualifications ? We 
have never recorded, or seen 
recorded, either the depth or 
the frequency of the rainfall, so 
we can only give the general 
impression formed by our own 
experiences — that rain is apt to 
fall in Veldcs as elsewhere, but 
that it does not spoil upon an 
average more than one day a 
week. Indeed, " spoil " is scarcely 
the word, inasmuch as soft, warm 
rain upon the naked body is an 
added delight, and a bath of 
steam instead of sun an added 
experience. We have, it is true, 
been sometimes kept indoors— if 
indoors it can be called by heavy 
cold rains, or terrific thunder- 
storms, but even they have had 
their compensations, 

UNIVERSITY OraiCHI'JAN 



4 8 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 




THE STEI'S— V'ELMS. 



The nearest qualified doctor is to be found 
in the institution itself, to which, by order of 
the Austrian Government, he is attached as 
responsible medical officer. Any, then, who 
will trust the qualifications of other lands 
need have no fear. But it should be said 
that the nursing staff, like everything else, 
is rough and primitive, and that delicate 
people accustomed to gen tie -handed attention 
should, if inclined to make the venture, take 



with them their 
own attendant 
and — pace the 
* Doctor J! — their 
own medicine- 
chest. 

I am not in 
league with this 
arch-heretic, so do 
not recommend 
all sorts and con- 
ditions of sick 
men and women 
to exchange physic 
for nakedness, 
But I am sure no 
man whose fleshly 
ills go no deeper 
than my own could 
fail to profit by 
making the experi- 
ment. Nor need 
there be any fear 
of boredom. The 
lake is good for swimming and boating, and 
for such as love them there are cycles, and 
tennis courts, and music gardens. For my- 
self, when 1 tired of book or friend 3 medita- 
tion upon the strangeness and significance of 
my doings afforded a sufficient distraction* 
The body is still too often confounded with 
the flesh, and it is a stimulating experience to 
assist, even in so small a measure as at 
Veldes, in its spiritualization. 




THE ISLAND— VELDES, 



by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 






g|v|6sfC^ 








EW objects on this earth are 
more beautiful than a Consular 
Kawass, His wages may be 
small, but that is more than 
compensated for by the <*or- 
geousncss of his clothes. His 
outer garment unites the merits of an Inver- 
ness coat, a lady's cloak, an Arab abbaye 
and an Ulster* Sometimes it is short, and 
comes only to his waist; often it is long, 
reaching down to his heels. It is wonderfully 
embroidered with threads of silver and of 
gold, and also threads of silk t coloured green, 
crimson, yellow, blue, and purple. There 
are wings attached to this garment at the 
shoulders, which give the Kawass the ap- 
pearance of a huge bird of tropical climes as 
he hurries down a Turkish street ; and as if 
this were not enough glury, there is worked 
on his back the coatof-arms of the country 
he represents. The emblems of some coun- 
tries suit the back of a Kawass better than 
the devices of others. There is Austria, lor 
instance, whose double-headed black eagle 
stands out strongly in contrast with the 
rainbow splendour of the coat, and an eagle's 
head standing out on each shoulder-blade 
makes the balance perfect* 

When the Consul drives abroad in his 
carriage, the Kawass mounts upon the seat 
with the coachman, and has his hands 
crossed over the hilt of a broad, semi-circular 

VoL jnri.— 7- Copyright, iBqS, bv Roirert Barr, 

Digitized 



scimitar : that new-moon-shaped sword which 
we see the executioner in Eastern pictures 
wiping on the tail of his coat, after he has 
rolled off a few heads on the pavement. As 
the Kawass usually has great* sweeping black 
moustaches, the addition of the sword gives 
him an appearance of great bloodthirstiness, 
which is most impressive. As a matter of 
fact, however, he is a harmless individual, 
who runs errands for the Consul, and 
conducts tourists to mosques and places of 
that sort, accepting with thankfulness a 
small gift in recognition of his services, 

Mr. Turner's Kawass knocked at the door 
of the Consular room, and on being told to 
enter, displayed to the Consul a face labouring 
under some powerful agitation. 

" Well, what is it ? " asked Consul Turner. 

11 Excellency, the man who disappeared 
has come back," 

"What man who disappeared. Selim?" 

u The cold-water man, Excellency." 

"Oh, McSimmins? He didn't disappear; 
he went home, you remember. He sent his 
papers to me about a month ago, with a 
request for a permit to leave the country, 
which was quite unnecessary. You brought 
me the papers, and 1 gave them back to you/' 

"Yes, Excellency," said the Kawass, 
nervously. 

(t So he has returned, has he? What does 
he want ? " 

in ihe United SMivhefl^ifpEkm 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



5° 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



" Yes, Excellency ; and he demands to see 
you, but I thought it belter not to let him in." 

-Why, Selim?" 

" I think he is insane, Excellency.' 

"Oh, that is nothing new. I thought it 
from the first.' 1 

** He is here, Excellency, in a Turkish 
Pasha's uniform, and he will not go away. 
Then he acted very strangely, and it may 
not be safe to let him in + " 

u 0h, nonsense ! Let him come in. 
McSimrnins wouldn't hurt anybody/' 

The Kawass departed with evident 
reluctance, and shortly after nn extra- 
ordinary figure presented itself to the 
Consul's view* He wore the costume 
of a Turkish Pasha, and had stuck 
on his head a red fez with a long 
silken tassel He came in, stepping 
with gingerly caution, as if walking 
on thin ice. He held his open hands 
tremblingly before him, as if antici- 
pating a fall, and his head bobbed 
about in an erratic manner that 
threatened to dislodge the tarbush 
he wore, and kept the silken tassel 
swaying to and fro, 

"I— I— I— I'm afraid; 1 he said, 
with a stammer, "that you won't 
recognise me, Mr. Turner." 

"Oh, yes, I do s J ' replied the Consul 
"You are Mr. McSimrnins, who came 
over here to convert the Turk by 
means of a daily bath, quite ignoring 
my suggestion that the Turk already 
performed his ablutions five 
times a day." 

"Ah, yes, Consul, quite true, 
quite true; but only his hands 
and feet, and I still hold that if 
you submerge the Turk once a 
day, he would prove a different 
man." 

"Well/' said the Consul, "I 
have often thought that if the 
whole country were submerged for twenty 
minutes it would be, on the whole, an 
improvement ; still, that is an opinion that 
must not be mentioned outside the Consular 
residence, Hut, as I suggested to you 
before, if cleanliness were your object, the 
Turkish bath is not altogether unknown 
even in our own country, and is supposed 
to be reasonably efficient" 

" It is warm and enervating," said 
McSimrnins, speaking with stuttering hesi- 
tation, which seemed to show that his theory 
was not perfectly grounded. " I advocate 
cold water, you know 



"Yes, I remember you did," began the 
Consul, but he was interrupted by McSimrnins 
suddenly precipitating himself on the floor, 
and clutching wildly at the carpet, The 
Consul sprang to his feet with an exclamation 
of dismay. 

" Its all right," cried McSimrnins ; "don't 
be alarmed. The room is spinning round, 
but it will steady down in a minute ; then 111 




by Google 



Ys ALL RIGHT* CKlEU llCfilMMMS ; ' &ON't BE ALAfcttlf}.' ' 



get up. Just wait till things come to a stand- 
still again." 

Presently the grovelling man rose to his 
knees, and then, tremulously, to his feet. 

"You will e\cuse me if I sit down?" he 
asked. 

"Certainly," said the Consul, also seating 
himself. "What is the trouble— St Vitus's 
dance, or anything of that kind ?" 

"Something of that kind," echoed the 
visitor, " I don't really know what the 
trouble is, but Til tell you what it feels like. 
It feels as if my brain had become loosened 
from the inside of my skull, like a ripe kernel 
Original from 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



THE PASHA'S PRISONER. 



5* 



in a nut; then if I walk hurriedly it turns 
over, and the whole world turns with it, and 
I have to get down on my hands and knees 
and shake my head till my brain gets right- 
side up again. Do I make myself clear ? " 

"Oh, perfectly clear,' 7 said the Consul, 
edging his chair back a little. "Will you 
excuse me, Mr. McSitnmins, while I call in 
my Kawass ? I have some business for him 
to do, and you can tell your story with perfect 
freedom in his presence, for I make a 
confidant of him anyhow," and the Consul 
reached his hand towards the bell. 

McSimmins smiled grimly. 

" You needn't be afraid, Consul ; I am not 
going to touch you. Of course, no man 
makes a confidant of his Kawass, and you 
think now that I am crazy. I don't blame 
you at all, and if you are really afraid of me, 
draw your chair near the door, and I'll stay 
over in the remotest corner of the room ; but 
I would like you to listen to what I have to 
say, officially — that is what you are here for, 
you know." 

" Oh, I am not afraid at all," replied the 
Consul, thinking it, however, worth while to 
add, " I never think myself in danger, because 
I keep my loaded revolver in the drawer 
here before me," saying which he took the 
weapon out and placed it on his table. 

" A most sensible precaution," rejoined 
McSimmins, nodding his head. The nodding 
seemed to be unfortunate, for he paused 
breathlessly, put his two open palms up to 
the side of his face, gave his head a few jerks, 
this way and that, and then murmured, with 
a sigh of contentment: "That's all right." 
The Consul thought it well to ignore the 
re-turning of the brain, which was evidently 
taking place under McSimmins's manipula- 
tion, and so he said, as if nothing extra- 
ordinary had happened : — 

" When did you return, Mr. McSimmins ? " 

" Return ; from where ? " 

" You sailed for home about a month ago." 

"Oh, no, I didn't ! " corrected the visitor. 

"Well, you sent your papers here, and 
asked for a permit to leave the country, and 
1 wrote a note to you saying that a permit 
was not necessary, and not hearing from you 
again, I took it for granted that you had 
sailed." 

" Ah, I see," mused McSimmins, about to 
nod again, which motion he suddenly stopped 
by putting his hand to his forehead. " I have 
never left Turkey ; in truth, I have been the 
guest of Zimri Pasha for the last month." 

"Really!" said the Consul. "Well, the 
Pasha is a most excellent man, and I wish 

Digitized by GoG^lc 



thfere were more officials like him. He told 
me he took a great interest in your cold- 
water scheme, and was doing his best to help 
you, and seemed surprised to hear that 1 
didn't take much interest in it myself." 

" Yes, I think I converted him," said 
McSimmins, " but only this afternoon. 
About a month ago he sent a messenger to 
me asking me to bring my papers to him, and 
added that he would be glad to learn some- 
thing further of the scheme I had in hand, as 
he was inclined to believe in it, and wished 
for more information." 

"That's what he told me," remarked the 
Consul, " and he expressed his regret at your 
early departure." 

" Very well. I called on him at the hour 
named, which was after dark. You know the 
Pasha's house, perhaps, Consul ? " 

" Yes, I have visited him somewhat fre- 
quently. He is, as I have said, the most 
intelligent Turkish official I have yet met, 
and seems to have a sincere desire to elevate 
the people." 

"That describes him exactly," agreed 
McSimmins. " He delights in the elevation 
of the people, and is very successful at it, 
too." 

" I shouldn't go so far as to say that," 
demurred the Consul. " I have never 
observed any practical results from his 
endeavours in that line." 

" Ah, there you do him wrong," pleaded 
McSimmins, earnestly. " You see, I know 
the Pasha better than you do, for I have 
been his guest for a month. But to go on 
with my story. On entering, I was led past 
the semi -public room in which the Pasha 
transacts his business, taken across the first 
court, in which the palm trees grow, into a 
smaller room beyond — a room along the 
three sides of which were divans covered 
with rich Oriental rugs ; and here, asking 
me to be seated, the attendant disappeared 
between the heavy curtains which hung over 
the doorway. Presently that obsequious 
secretary of the Pasha came in, followed 
by a servant bearing a tray on which 
were two tiny cups of coffee. The 
secretary saluted me with that grovelling 
deference of which he is the cringing master, 
and asked me to be good enough to give 
him all my papers, so that the Pasha might 
scrutinize them. The Pasha, he added, 
would have pleasure in meeting me socially 
after the business was transacted. I had my 
passport, teskary, and the document giving 
me the right of domicile, in a blue envelope 
reposing in my inside pocket, and this 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



5* 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



envelope I handed to the secretary. He 
then bade me, in his masters name, regale 
myself with the coffee* which I did, I 
imagine the coffee was drugged, for shortly 
after taking it I became sleepy, and re- 
membered no more until I found 
myself securely pinioned in the 
Court of the (treat Fountain. 
Have you seen the Court of the 
Great Fountain ? tJ 

" No," , replied the Consul ; 
" I have never been admitted 
further into the residence of 
the Pasha than the Court of the 
Palms." 

"The Pasha's house is an 
enormous conglomeration of 
buildings, somewhat resembling 
a .stone-walled city. Beautiful 
as the Court of Palms is, it 
does not compare with the 
magnificence of the Court of 
the Great Fountain. The pave- 
ment is a mosaic of various 
coloured marble ; all the rest is 
of the purest white. Arabic 
arches are supported by very 
slender, glistening pillars, which 
seemed to me to be made of 
onyx, or some rare white stone. 
The arches themselves are of 
marble, looking like carved 
virgin snow ; these form a broad, 
cool veranda that completely 
surrounds the court. The floor 
of the veranda is elevated 
perhaps six inches above the 
tessellated pavement and is 
almost covered with rich 
But the striking feature of 
the fountain. The water, I imagine, is 
obtained from some stream or lake in the 
neighbouring mountains, and the fountain 
consists of one huge jet as thick as a man's 
thigh, which shoots straight up into the 
air like a liquid palm tree, It falls back 
musically into a deep, broad pond, which is 
bordered by a heavy coping of marble. The 
convolutions of this coping form a margin to 
this pond that is amazingly irregular, and, the 
Pasha told me, spells out in Arabic his 
favourite test from the Koran, 13 

"What an excellent idea," interrupted the 
Consul 

" Isn't it ? IJ agreed his visitor, " Perhaps 
I didn't appreciate it at the moment as much 
as I should have done, for I found myself in 
a most cramped and uncomfortable [position. 
A stout stick had been thrust under mv 



knees, and my arms had been drawn under 
the projecting ends of this stick, until the 
el how -joints permitted them to bend up 
against my breast. My wrists were strapped 
together, and the straps fastened in some 




'AN LMUMf-UKrAULK JOSITICJN. 



Persian rugs* 
the court is 



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K 



IC 



way behind my back. My ankles were 
united by fetters, and I lay thus in a helpless 
heap like a trussed fowl. The Pasha sat 
cross-legged on a pile of rugs and pillows 
under the veranda, peacefully smoking a 
water pipe, whose hubble-bubble was drowned 
by the musical plashing of the great fountain. 
He sipped now and then some coffee 
from a little cup on a table by his side, and 
regarded me placidly with that serene, con- 
templative gaze which you may have noticed 
in his dreamy eyes when he is inclined to 
converse on philosophic subjects. Standing 
near him were four stalwart Nubians, black 
as ebony, whose tongues the Pasha afterwards 
informed me he had been compelled to order 
to be removed, as irresponsible gossip among 
his menials was irksome to him, 

u After a time the Pasha was good enough 
to address me. He expressed in choice 
phrase his pleasure at seeing me a guest 
Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



THE PASHA'S PRISONER. 



53 



under his humble roof, although at the 
moment the roof above me was the sky, 
besprinkled with brilliant stars. He added 
that he had been much interested in my cold- 
water scheme, and would be pleased to learn 
from my own lips how I was getting on since 
I had honoured his district with my presence. 

" I replied, with a glance at my bonds, that 
just at the moment 1 was not getting on with 
any degree of rapidity. The Pasha was 
condescending enough to smile at this, and 
bow towards me ; then, after a few whiffs at 
his pipe, and a sip of coffee from a cup on 
the table beside him, he proceeded, with the 
utmost suavity : — 

44 * I have been giving some attention of 
late to the cold-water problem, and have 
determined to make some practical experi- 
ments that will test its value. The marble 
coping round the fountain at your back was 
constructed by a Greek slave whom I once 
possessed, who, although he had most 
artistic hands, laboured under the affliction 
of a flighty head, which I was compelled to 
remove. Under my directions he did his 
work well, and the coping spells in Arabic 
the phrase : — 

" 4 " If you meet a friend in the desert who 
lacks for water, give him of your store 
plenteously." 

" 4 1 now propose to vivify this motto by 
following its counsel on your behalf.' 

44 ' Indeed, Pasha,' said I, 4 there is a suffi- 
ciency of water about me already, and my 
clothes are even now wet through.' 

444 My Nubians,' returned the Pasha, calmly, 
4 wf re reluctantly compelled to dip you in 
the fountain, so that you might return to the 
full enjoyment of your senses, which had 
seemingly departed from you ; this submer- 
sion has happily had the desired result, and 
thus I have the privilege of holding converse 
with you. But my bounty does not stop so 
meagrely. The adage says, 44 Plenteously," 
and upon that adage I purpose lo act.' 

44 4 1 beg to call your attention, Pasha, to the 
fact that I am a citizen of a country at peace 
with the Government of the Sultan. With 
the utmost respect towards your authority, I 
hereby protest against my present treatment, 
and warn you that, if you contemplate further 
indignity, you will carry it out at your peril.' 

44 The Pasha stroked his beard, and acknow- 
ledged my remark with a courteous bow. 

44 4 That introduces the elements of an 
international discussion into our conversa- 
tion,' he said, with a reproachful tinge in 
his tone, 'and in social intercourse I think 
anything of a political nature is prone to 



prove a disturbing element. Let us confine 
ourselves to your cold-water theories.' With 
this he made a sign to his Nubians, and two 
of them springing forward picked me up a£ 
if I had been a bale of goods, and, swaying 
me backwards and forwards, suddenly heaved 
me into the up-spring of the fountain. The 
tremendous jet cf water struck me on the 
back as if it were a battering ram, and I felt 
myself projected into the air like a shot from 
a cannon's mouth. UnfortunatelvJ have not 
at my command the language to depict the 
horror of that moment. I was whirled round 
and round with dizzying rapidity, and when 
I tried to scream, the water dashed into my 
open mouth with choking force. My agony 
was mental rather than physical, for except 
when I turned over and lay mouth down- 
ward to the jet, I cannot say there was much 
bodily inconvenience. Once, when I remained 
for a few moments in a sitting posture, I saw 
that I was high in the air above the tops of 
the tallest palms, popping up and down like 
a pea on a hot griddle. In spite of the 
motion, I could easily recognise the deserted 
city, lying calm in the moonlight, and so, 
remembering the hard marble pavement far 
below, I feared that I would tumble help- 
lessly over and be smashed into fragments 
on the stone. Such a catastrophe', however, 
did not happen, and by-and-by I saw that it 
was utterly impossible to escape from the 
influence of the water-jet. The great danger 
was of being smothered in the spray; drowned 
in mid-air. I had the peculiar sensation of 
sinking into a watery cushion, whose rebound 
dandled me as if I were a baby. Sometimes, 
when the powerful fountain gave me an extra 
fling aloft, I turned over and came head down- 
wards with sickening swiftness into what 
seemed to be a hollow tube of water ; then I 
came near to suffocation ; but, by-and-by, the 
heaving column would reassert its power and 
toss me aloft again, when I could breathe 
once more. Now and then I caught a glimpse 
of the full moon in the cloudless blue sky, 
and it appeared to be dancing a hilarious 
jig with me. In spite of the noise of the 
water, I heard the Pasha clap his hands, 
and express approval of the spectacle. 

44 4 Excellent, excellent,' he cried; c the 
gifted McSimmins dances with gratifying 
ability.' 

44 My torture for that night ended with a 
moment of most intense fear. I imagine 
that the Pasha gave a sign, and a slave, with 
a lever, suddenly turned off the water. I 
seemed left for an instant suspended in the 
sky ; then I dropped like a falling star. The 



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IC 



Ml I I '.' I 1 1 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



54 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



concentrated anguish of that infinitesimal 
portion of rime, I shall never forget. It was 
in my mind that the Pasha intended to im- 
pale me on the standpipe from which 
the jet issued, but such was not the 
case. The water was turned on again 
before 1 reached the level of the veranda, 
and such was the terrific force of the impact, 
it rising and me falling, that I became 
instantly insensible, and when I w f oke to 



no light, and very little air, and there I iay 
all night unable to sleep, sprawling round on 
the floor, which seemed to be heaving under 
nie* Next evening I was taken out again, 
and once more flung into the fountain. All 
the while I anticipated that dreadful drop 
again ; but the Pasha, fearing probably that 
he would kill me outright, amused himself 
by modifying the torture. The slaves gave 
periodical jerks at the lever, cutting off a 




consciousness I found myself stretched on 
some rugs under the veranda, my wet 
garments removed* But* perhaps, I weary 
you with this lengthened recital ?** 

* 4 On the contrary," said the Consul, S *I 
was never more interested in my life-" 

The visitor nodded, and having disturbed 
his brain by doing so, re-adjusted it by 
manipulating his head with his hands. 

"1 was taken to a cell in which there was 



by Google 



little water at a time, and lowering it a few 
feet, so that I descended by stages until 
almost on a level with the veranda, then I 
would be shot up into mid-air again. Night 
after night of this gave me that loosening 
sensation in the brain of which I complained 
to you, and the result of which you saw when 
I fell on the carpet, I sometimes got a 
little sleep in my cell during the day, but my 
rest was always broken, for the moment I 
Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



THE PASHA'S PJUSOA'ER. 



55 




" SPRAWLING HOtrSD ON THE K1JH>K. 

began to dream I was tossing in the fountain 
again. At last I saw that insanity was 
hound to intervene* so I resolved on suicide. 
One evening, by a great effort, being more 
loosely bound than usual, I turned a kind of 
somersault and flung myself free of the 
column of water. I hoped to strike the 
marble pavement, but I fell, instead, into the 
]>ond, and was instantly fished out by the 
Nubians. 1 told the Pasha I was determined 
to kill myself, and so for several nights 
I was not brought out from my cell. Some- 
times I thought that he had relented, but the 
more I pondered over the situation I saw 
that he dare not let me go, for if 1 could get 
my Government to believe the extraordinary 
tale I had to tell, they would be bound to 
bring him to book for it. When again I was 
dragged into the Court of the ( Jreat Fountain, 
1 found that in the interval he had built a 
sort of basket around the stand pipe. This 
was made of, springy steel or iron, and it 
opened like a huge flowers upwards, some- 
thing like a metal call a lily of network, if you 
understand what I mean ? 

'**I should be delighted, Mr. MeSimmins/ 
said the Pasha, most blandly, ' if you would 
favour me again with your vault from the top 
of the column/ I favoured him, and fell 
into the network of the basket, and was 
hurled instantly into the jet, and aloft again 



bydOOgle 



almost before I realized that 1 had 
dropped. This amused the Pasha 
very much, and he was loud in his 
praise of the feat. Wishing to test 
still further the efficacy of the 
basket, the fountain, being gradually 
shut off, lowered me into the recep- 
tacle, then the Nubians took me 
out of it, undid my bonds, and set 
my limbs free. When this was 
done, at a sign from the Pasha, 
they flung me sprawling into the 
basket I clasped the network and 
shrieked, while they pushed me 
farther in, until at last the water 
caught me once more. Breathless 
with its force, I found myself afloat, 
but this time with arms and legs 
loose, sprawling like the wings of a 
windmill gone maq\ I was amazed 
to find, after a time, that I could 
acquire the art of balancing myself, 
because of this freedom of the 
limbs, and before the night had 
passed I was able to stand upright 
and tread water, as it were, keeping 
my position for some time, by the 
exercise of great care. Of course, 
every now and then all my calculations were 
overset by the sudden ceasing of the fountain, 
which, removing my support and instantly 
undermining my confidence, left me flounder- 
ing helplessly in the basket, until it resumed 
its impetus. After the basket had been 
constructed, the Pasha, apparently selfishly, 
wished to enjoy the spectacle alone, 
and accordingly sent his slaves away, and 
they remained absent until the clapping of 
his hands brought them into the court again, 
when I was lowered and taken to my cell. 
And now, Consul Turner, you see how I have 
been treated. I have no complaint to make, 
and do not intend to give you any trouble in 
this matter at all ; but 1 am fatigued with 
talking, and if you will charitably allow me a 
bed in your house to-night, 1 shall be deeply 
grateful to you/' 

''Certainly, Mr. MeSimmins, certainly. But 
how did you escape ? n 

"If you will permit me. Consul, after the 
manner of the l Arabian Nights,' to leave the 
remainder of the story untold until to- 
morrow morning, it will be a great kindness 
to me in my present state of fatigue/' 

11 But it won't take you long, Mr. 
MeSimmins, to give me the climax. Do you 
mean to say that this treatment of you lasted 
the whole of the past month ? " 

u Up to this very evening, Consul I have 
Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



56 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



my own reasons for wishing to postpone the 
culmination of my narrative until tomorrow 
morning, if you will be so good as to indulge 
me. You see that I am in a shattered con- 
dition ; my nerves are wrecked, and although 
1 do not know that I can sleep, I would like 
very much to go to bed. ' 

" You are perfectly safe here," said the 
Consul, " and need have no further anxiety. 
I shall make my Kawass sleep outside your 
door to protect you." 

" No, no, Consul, I don't want a Turk near 
me, and I distrust your Kawass, and all the 
rest of them. Would you mind to-night, if 
you have a double-bedded room, to be in the 
same room with me ? " 

u I can do better than that," said the 
Consul ; " there is a room opening off mine, 
and I shall have a bed put in it, then no one 
can come near you without passing through 
my room." 

"Thatwill do excellently," said McSimmins, 
seemingly much relieved. 

%4 The difficulty in obtaining redress," con- 
tinued the Consul, " will be in proving what 
you say ; but somehow I find myself believing 
your story, incredible as it is, and I also 
believe the Pasha's secretary gave your papers 
to my Kawass, so that, in a way, is direct 
proof. I shall call the Pasha to account to- 
morrow morning." 

" No," said McSimmins, " I do not wish 
redress, nor do I ask you to take the slightest 
trouble on my account." 

u But such treatment of a free citizen of a 
friendly country is intolerable, and we must 
at least attempt to obtain justice, although I 
am not confident that you will get any satis- 
faction." 

" Well, if you don't mind, we will discuss 
that to-morrow morning. I really feel unable 
to cope with even the simplest problem 
to - night Remember, I spent the fore 
part of this evening at the top of that 
fountain." 

The Consul, without more ado, led 
McSimmins to his chamber, and several 
times that night heard him thumping round 
the room on the floor. 

It was early in the morning when Consul 
Turner entered his guest's room, and found 
him lying awake. 

" I am afraid," he said, " that you did not 
have much rest last night." 

" Oh, indeed, I feel quite refreshed, thank 
you ; although I precipitated myself on the 
floor several times during the night. I hope 
I did not disturb you ? " 

"Not at all," replied the Consul. "And 



by Google 



now, will you excuse my curiosity and tell me 
how you escaped ? " 

" That was, after all, a very simple matter. 
I don't know whether I told you that, to save 
themselves trouble, they were in the habit of 
flinging me into the fountain stark naked ; 
but, as 1 think I mentioned, I became quite 
expert at balancing myself on the top of the 
jet. I,ast night, when the slaves had departed, 
I put my hands over my head and projected 
myself into the air, endeavouring to fall clear 
of the basket, which I did. In a moment I 
scrambled over the marble coping, and I 
think the Pasha was dozing, for he made no 
motion either to stop me or to call his slaves. 
I was afraid my brain would play me a trick, 
and so I acted with intense celerity. In a 
moment I was at his throat, and had him 
pinioned and helpless on his back. Gripping 
his windpipe with my left hand, I undid his 
scarf with my right, and soon had it bow- 
stringed round his neck " 

" You surely did not strangle him ? " cried 
the Consul, horrified. 

" Oh, no, I shouldn't think of doing such 
a thing. I have a great respect for the 
position of Pasha. I gagged him so that he 
could not cry out, and tied his hands so 
that he could not clap them together ; then, 
with some difficulty, I stripped him and put 
on his clothes. He seemed stunned and 
helpless by the suddenness of my onslaught ; 
almost pallid with fear. Seeing that he 
was too panic-stricken to cry out, I un- 
gagged him and unbound his hands, then 
picking him up— all the time I was struggling 
with him, remember, I saw three Pashas, my 
brain wobbling about like loose nails in a 
rolling barrel, but I steadily concentrated my 
attention on the middle Pasha, and resolved 
to attend to the other two afterwards, if they 
were there ; so, as I say, I flung him, back 
downwards, into the basket, and before you 
could snap your fingers, he was dancing on 
the water-spout high above the palm trees. 
The other two Pashas had gone up with him, 
and so, folding his robes around me, I walked 
calmly down the passage, through the Monkey 
Court, along the other passage, through the 
Court of Palms, and so out into the street 
unimpeded ; the watchman opening the 
gate for me, and closing it behind me 
without a word. That is the beauty of 
having well-trained servants, unaccustomed 
to question any act a man does. From 
there T came directly to your residence, and 
here I remain until you can get me on ship- 
board." 

" But, great Heaven, McSimmins ! You 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



THE PASHA'S PRISONER. 



57 



don't mean to say you have left the Pasha 
there all night?" 

u I have but followed his own Arabic text, 
which you will find engraved around his 
fountain. I have given him water, and 
plenty of it. It was not for me to interfere 
further. I did not tell you last ni^ht, fearing 
you might consider it your duty to intervene. 



small personal matter like this, knowing they 
would talk a great deal, and do nothing And, 
after all, one cannot pay a greater compliment 
to his host than to follow his example/ 5 

"I must send down at once and see what 
is the outcome of this." 

"Certainly," returned McSimmins ; "it 
would only be a neighbourly thing to do/' 



\ Ah'i 





ft™ 




.-gfrif - / 



IIF. HAS DAMClMi ON THE WATKK'SrUL'T. 



If the Pasha likes his position at the top of 
the fountain, he has doubtless remained 
there, and I can assure him, from experience, 
that it will take him several days before he is 
able to make the dive I took." 

**Oh, but this is most serious, McSimmins, 
taking the law into your own hands in that 
way T and endangering the person of the 
Pasha." 

" I took the l\isha into my own hands, hut 

there is no law in his caravansary, and I 

didn't like to trouble my Government over 4 
V 9 i. *vi-9 



Hut at that moment the gorgeous Kawass 
rapped at the Consul's door. 

" Excellency," lie said, a thrill of fear in 
his quivering voice, "news has come that the 
Pasha Zimri has been found drowned in his 
own fountain. Mysterious are the ways of 
Allah, the good Pasha is gone," 

"Ah," said McSimmins, grimly, "every 
situation has its compensations. If he has 
had too much water in this world, it is not 
likely that he will have to complain of an 
overm nply tflBHW 11 ' 

UNIVERSITY Of MICHIGAN 



Portraits of Celebrities at Different Times of their Lives. 



H.R.H. PRINCE 

CHRISTIAN. 

Born 1831, 

rince Chris- 
tian, otherwise 

playfully called 
11 Uncle Chris- 
tian n by the 
younger folks of our Royal 
Family, is perhaps the most 
popular man in their home 





ai-e: 15. 
JF^OKrt tkt Draw. 
inQ by Cart Hart' 



Ar-g 31. 
From a Photo, bv I till* £ S*vnd§rt T Eton. 



circle. He married Princess Christian in 
1866, when he received the title of Royal 
Highness by command of Hur Majesty, being 
also treated a Knight of the Garter. On 



their Royal Highnesses* 
marriage, Parliament 
granted the Princess a 
dcr-ver of ^30,000 and an 
annuity of p£6,ooo. The 
Prince is a great lover 
of all athletic and manly 
sports, and the many 
fine hunting trophies that 
adorn his residence at 
Cumberland Lodge, 
Windsor Great Park, are 
ample evidence of his 
various successes. 




AGE 5a 
ftvm a Photo, hv AUx. Banana. 




AGE 43. 

From a Photo by W r <* J>- 

3ioiliz&d cv wj 



"--" 




rpi^ENV PAY, 

ri ihwsl'fflb tf\ Al **' ***** 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



PORTRAITS OF CELEBRITIES. 



59 



H.R.H. PRINCESS 

CHRISTIAN, 



deal of good work. Like all 
the ladies of our Royal Family, 
she is essentially a womanly 
woman. 

FvtftA a Ptwto. bit (♦'. <* D. Dwmt^ 




ments of philanthropy, especially with 
regard to nursing associations, such 
as the Royal British Nurses' Asso- 
ciation, which is doing an immense 



Harrington Road. 



6o 



2 HE STfiAND MAGAZINE. 



MR. EDWARD JOHN 
GREGORY, It A. 

Born 1850, 
R. E. J. GREGORY, one 
of our latest ILA/s, is 
the son of John Gregory, 
who was engineer- in- 
charge of the auxiliary 
in Sir John Franklin's 
At the age of thirty- 




engines 
Expedition. 




Protn a] 



age t^ I ftosf oprap&. 



nine he obtained the gold and 
silver medals at the Paris Inter- 
national Exhibition ; and among 
his most brilliant achievements 





FVnm* ft] 



AGS 33* 



[Photograph. 



a masterpiece of portraiture, and " Boulter's 
Lock." Mr. Gregory's pictures are few in 
number, and generally small in size ; but 
wherever they appear they are always in the 
front rank, and it is, therefore, not surprising 
to note that Mr. Gregory's work is most 
appreciated by the iiiie of the artistic world. 



Photo. ?'»\ MiB rf- \ Rowland TaifSof. 

may be mentioned "Dawn," "Last Touches," 
11 St George," "Sir Galahad," a wonder- 
ful likeness gf Miss Galloway, in itself 

O 




tf ERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



A Cruise on a Modern Ram. 



By J, A, Guthkie* 




SHORT descriptive narrative 
of the cruise of the United 
States ram Kaiahdin % the 
"only nautical engine of war 
of its class in the navies of 
the world," might prove both 
interesting and instructive to your readers. 
Of course, to those unacquainted with naval 
architecture, and such as have their own ideas 
about the heavy armoured battleships and 
cruisers, the assertion that we possess the 
only complete ram, and one, too, capable of 
weathering storms, would seem paraphrastic ; 
but an investigation and careful examina- 
tion of the 
accompanying 
illustrations will 
convince the 
doubting public 
of the facts of 
the case. The 
cruise, an ac- 
count of which 
has never been 
published be- 
fore, is an actual 
record of the 
experience of 
thos^ on board. 
To come to 
essentials, we 
will commence 
where the ship 
first essayed her 
career only a 
short time 
stnee- 

About two 
years ago, a 
peculiar type of 

war vessel was launched at Bath, Maine, and 
christened Katahdin, after a well-known 
mountain located in the northern section of 
that State, It is an aboriginal name, 
significant and characteristic, as its meaning 
relates to electric phenomena observed on 
the summit by the natives. The Indians 
supposed an enormous creature, with winged 
daws, dwelt thereon, feasted on human flesh, 
and emitted fire and smoke from its mouth. 
They superstitiously venerated this abode of 
their demure god, and offered propitiatory 




sacrifices ; for, according to their traditional 
religion, this was absolutely necessary to ward 
off evil, and shield them from harm and 
danger. Historic Mount Katahdin was not 
renowned in American classics as an Olympus 
or Parnassus, yet it does seem quaintly 
apposite that such a name, so rich in Indian 
lore, should be selected for a most destructive 
war machine, deadly and terrific in attack, 
swift, strong, and enduring. 

In order to comprehend what a ram 
really is, and by analogy compare this 
recent addition to our navy with other war- 
ships, a brief description may be opportune, 

so we can under- 
stand its qualifi- 
ca tio n s for 
cruising on the 
high seas, and 
its fighting 
share in the 
dreadful havoc 
of war. 

The arched 
armoured deck 
rising some 5ft 
above the water- 
line forms a pro- 
tective covering 
and ironclad 
roof the entire 
length and 
breadth of the 
ship, varying in 
thickness ain, 
on the crown, 
gradually in- 
creasing to 6in., 
and fashioned 
into a cutting 
edge at or below the water-line as the case 
may be, The water-line depends upon 
whether the ship is trimmed for actual 
warfare or not. When ready for action the 
trimming tanks arc full of water, but other- 
wise are kept empty. Besides the armoured 
deck there is a submerged armour belt 
backed by several feet of solid oak entirely 
surrounding the ship, as also the air passages, 
steam and smoke outlets are one and all 
armoured some distance above the crown 
of the deck,- 1 1 " l » 

"IVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



DOCK— WITH RAM AT SURFACE 
WATER. 



[Photo, 



6* 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



The conning-tower being of supreme 
importance, and the objective point in an 
engagement, is consequently protected with 
the thickest armour, i8in. steel plate. From 
it all communications must Ik; preserved, the 
engines, steering gearj etc, operated and 
controlled. Here the commanding officer 
is stationed, and directs the manoeuvres— it is 
the pilot-house as well as the central station 
for orders to all parts of the vessel. In a 
fight it is conse- 
quently exposed 
to the furious and 
concentrated fire 
of an enemy who 
seeks to disable 
it, and therefore 
we must expect to 
receive many tell- 
ing blows; but if 
no penetration is 
made, the inmates 
are comfortably 
safe, as ample 
provision exists to 
guard agai-nst 
violent jarring 
and concussion 
such as cellulose 
padding lining 
the inner walls, 
and extra hold- 
ing down bolts 
outside. 

The dimensions 
250ft. length and 




THE ARAIOLKKD DECK* AFT— WITH FJRST OFFICER. 
From a jFAoto, 



of the ram Kaiahdin are 
40ft. Gin. beam ; the 
average draught is about t6ft. 6in., producing 
a displacement of over 2,100 tons. From 
the measurements, and reckoning the speed 
at 15 knots an hour, the striking force may 
be calculated enormously powerful in foot- 
tons, and it is estimated with nice and exact 
certainty that a violent blow thus dealt 
would drive entirely through one of our 
unprotected cruisers. 

The principle upon which the Kaiahdin 
was constructed and designed embodied 
the one idea in its conception — a powerful 
ram as an engine of destruction ; exposed above 
the water surface as little as possible ; strength, 
celerity, and ready obedience to her steering 
apparatus. To attain this end, everything in 
conflict with that view was sacrificed, notably 
in the weight of her armament, as her battery 
consists of only four six-pound guns to chase 
off torpedo-boats approaching too near, and 
to repel boarders. Ramming being the 
main force and the purpose of her plan, pro- 
vision was made^ to resist and lessen the 



tremendous concussion incident thereon, her 
frame being laid in such a manner, making 
the most numerous and heaviest run fore and 
aft, converging at each end and bound together 
forward into an amalgamation with the solid 
casting that represents the ram proper. Her 
boilers and engines are braced by a wedge 
system that prevents their displacement, and 
doubly provided with extra braces holding 
them down w T hen the shock reaches that part 

of the ship* In 
fact, every pos- 
sible care is taken 
to prevent any 
detachable article 
from being moved 
or overturned at 
the critical 
moment 

But what be- 
comes of the 
officers and work- 
ing crew, and how 
are they supplied 
with fresh air in 
this sunken iron 
nondescript as she 
rushes through 
the waters in 
search of an un- 
wary enemy? 
The ventilating 
system and supply 
of fresh air are 
imperfect, but to remedy this 
lofty ventilators tower above, 
and purify the air between 
When the semi -submersion 
occurs, all hatches, dead -lights, 
means of communication with 
atmosphere are closed, water- 
sealed, as it were, and 
supply breathing air 
carry off the foul, 
quantity of fresh. 



tight, 
the 



'OiTSTC 



necessarily 
deficiency, 
and refresh 
the decks, 
for cruising 
and other 
the external 

hermetically 
high shafts must 
to the living quarters, 
and renew the requisite 
There are two of these shafts, armoured some 
distance up, situated immediately aft of 
amidships. Each is a double tube, the outer 
5ft, 6in,, the inner 3ft, 6in, diameter. The pure 
air gravitates down the outer tube, while the 
vitiated escapes through the inner, which 
projects above the top of the outer. The 
descending air is distributed by secondary 
conduits all throughout the ship, supplying 
the place of the already used and contami- 
nated air, which is pumped out by steam 
fans, which constantly vibrate. 

This system of artificial supply does not 
replace atmospheric inhalation to 

VERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



exactly 



A CRU/SE ON A MODERN RAM. 



63 




/Yowl a] 



[Photo. 



those confined between decks, because, firstly, 
rarefaction produces condensation of mois- 
ture on all metallic surfaces ; secondly, dis- 
agreeably perceptible in going from one 
compartment to another on opening and 
shutting a water-tight door leading therefrom, 
one often feels a sudden change in pressure 
upon the drums of one's ears, evidenced by the 
sharp click, which is oftentimes painful. Still, 
sanitary science was consulted and made 
tributary to preserve the health and respira- 
tion of the men who are to manage and fight 
this leviathan of the deep. 

To ram a vessel in a storm amid the 
howling winds and surging billows will 
certainly disconcert those on board— unless 
the ram immediately sinks her adversary; 
and this is a new departure in marine war- 
fare. It is a singular fact demonstrated by 
this cruise, that a marked difference exists 
between a rarn and the ordinary warship in 
encountering and driving through high, rough 
seas ; yet, shaped as she is, there is practically 
no rolling, no pitching, no combination cork- 
screw motion, the terror of the victims of 
maldt-wer ; but plunging straight ahead, 
ignoring the mighty seas that threaten to 
overwhelm her, like a great, strong, and stout 
whale, full of lusty life, she bucks her way 
r^-ardless of the immense weight of thunder- 
ing water encircling and poured in torrents 



upon her in every direction. Well may the 
furious seas splash with all the force born of 
a raging storm, and beat angrily upon a skin 
built to resist the most improved modern 
ordnance. 

Imagine this sea monster some black, 
tempestuous, and rainy night, accompanied 
by terrific peals of thunder and vivid flashes 
of lightning, away off from land—some 
hundreds of miles of ocean intervening — 
suddenly coming through the sea at full 
speed upon the flank of an unsuspecting 
enemy, Who would direct the shot to check 
her devastating career, or what projectile 
could pierce her slippery armour-coat amidst 
this tumultuous tempest? The chances are 
the enemy's shot, if she were perceived by the 
search-light, would be wide of the mark, and if 
she should be accidentally hit, would ricochet 
into the sea. Perhaps the advantage of steam- 
ing through the trough of the sea during a 
storm is not generally understood and 
appreciated, but it has been one of the 
axioms of seafaring men that no vessel could 
live in the trough, as they express it, and 
now we find there is an exception to the rule. 
The formidableness of this seaworthy ram 
under these conditions can be better illus- 
trated and exem plified after a personal 
experience on board in stormy weather. 

The Katahdin is coated entirely with a 

IVERSiTY OF MICHIGAN 



64 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



dull green paint, which renders her almost 
invisible on a cloudy night; quite so, if all the 
running lights arc extinguished. Then how 
terrible must be this monstrous, invisible, 
and living projectile hurled with all its massive- 
ness against some battleship! What can guard 
against this appalling danger lurking around in 
the Stygian darkness? Not even the warning 
pulsations of the engines ; for the roar of the 
mighty waves would drown all minor noises, 
and the whistling wind still the escaping 
steam. The Kaiakdht experienced one of 
these dark, dreary, and stormy nights on her 
voyage from New York to Hampton Roads 
last March, We were on this ship altogether 
forty-eight hours ; owing to the impenetrable 
darkness we lost our reckoning and parted 
our tiller ropes, which occasioned the delay. 
While repairing these in the storm, and keep- 
ing ourselves up in the wind as best we 
could by constant use of the engines, we 
drifted to the south of the Capes at the 
mouth of the Chesapeake Bay 3 and there it 



was we discovered what little di (Terence 
it was to us whether we were in the trough 
of the sea or headed to ; and here too we 
found ourselves right in the thickest of one of 
the very worst gales that had visited the sea- 
board for some years. Despite the high seas 
and howling winds, strange to relate, no one 
seemed to heed the storm without, fur below 
decks it was not supposed to be anything out 
of the ordinary ; hut we were soon afterwards 
made aware that a French tramp had 
pounded herself to pieces not many miles 
away from us ; and to think we were quietly 
taking our soup without so much as a rack 
on the table ; and so small was the degree of 
roll, that not even a glass of water over- 
turned. Words are inadequate to convey 
an idea of this novel and exhilarating 
experience at sea in a ram of this calibre, in 
a fearful tempest without knowing it, without 
feeling the rocking motion or the jars of the 
great mountains of seething and foaming 
water that the high winds lashed into fury. 




From a] 



THE RAM J4uVM>IN'*j TJilS LAST UUQY OW TftJAI- "IK II 1 



[Photo. 



by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



Miss Cay ley's Adventures. 

V.— THE ADVENTURE OF THE IMPROMPTU MOUNTAINEER. 

By Grant Allen. 




HE explosion and evaporation 
of Dr. Fortescue-Langley (with 
whom were amalgamated the 
Comte de Laroche-sur-Loiret, 
Mr. Higginson the courier, 
and whatever else that versatile 
gentleman chose to call himself) entailed 
many results of varying magnitudes. 

In th& first place, Mrs. Evelegh ordered a 
Great Manitou. That, however, mattered 
little to " the firm," as I loved to call us 
(because it shocked dear Elsie so) ; for, of 
course, after all her kindness we couldn't 
accept our commission on her purchase, so 
that she got her machine cheap for ^15 from 
the maker. But, in the second place —I declare 
I am beginning to write like a woman of busi- 
ness — she decided to run over to England for 
the summer to see her boy at Portsmouth, 
being certain now that the discoloration of 
her bangle depended more on the presence of 
sulphur in the india-rubber bottle than on the 
passing state of her astral body. Tis an abrupt 
descent from the inner self to a hot-water 
bottle, I admit ; but Mrs. Evelegh took the 
plunge with grace, like a sensible woman. 
Dr. Fortescue-Iangley had been annihilated 
for her at one blow : she returned forthwith 
to common-sense and England. 
" What will you do with the 
you're away ? " Lady Georgina 
she announced her intention, 
shut it up, to take care of itself. Every 
blessed thing in the place will go to rack and 
ruin. Shutting up a house means spoiling it 
for ever Why, I've got a cottage of my own 
that I let for the summer in the best part of 
Surrey — a pretty little place, now vacant, for 
which, by the way, I want a tenant, if you 
happen to know of one : and when it's left 

empty for a month or two " 

" Perhaps it would do for me ? " Mrs. 
Evelegh suggested, jumping at it. " I'm 
looking out for a furnished house for the 
summer, within easy reach of Portsmouth and 
London, for myself and Oliver." 

Lady Georgina seized her arm, with a face 
of blank horror. " My dear," she cried. 
" For you ! I wouldn't dream of letting it to 
you. A nasty, damp, cold, unwholesome 
house, on stiff clay soil, with detestable drains, 
in the deadliest part of the Weald of Surrey, 
—why, you and your boy would catch your 
deaths of rheumatism." 

Vol. xvu~ 9. 



chalet while 
asked, when 
"You can't 



by Google 



"Is it the one I saw advertised in the 
Times this morning, I wonder?" Mrs. Evelegh 
inquired, in a placid voice. "' Charming 
furnished house on Holmesdale Common ; 
six bedrooms, four reception-rooms ; splendid 
views ; pure air ; picturesque surroundings ; 
exceptionally situated.' I thought of writing 
about it." 

" That's it ! " I^ady Georgina exclaimed, 
with a demonstrative wave of her hand. " I 
drew up the advertisement myself. Ex- 
ceptionally situated ! I should just think it 
was ! Why, my dear, I wouldn't let you rent 
the place for worlds ; a horrid, poky little 
hole, stuck down in the bottom of a boggy 
hollow, as damp as Devonshire, with the 
paper peeling off the walls, so that I had to 
take my choice between giving it up myself 
ten years ago, or removing to the cemetery ; 
and I've let it ever since to City men with 
large families. Nothing would induce me to 
allow you and your boy to expose yourself 
to such risks." For I^idy Georgina had taken 
quite a fancy to Mrs. Evelegh. " But what 
I was just going to say was this : you can't 
shut your house up ; it'll all go mouldy. 
Houses always go mouldy, shut up in 
summer. And you can't leave it to your 
servants ; / know the baggages ; no con- 
science — no conscience ; they'll ask their 
entire families to come and stop with them en 
bioc> and turn your place into a perfect piggery. 
Why, when I went away from my house in 
town one autumn, didn't I leave a policeman 
and his wife in charge — a most respectable 
man — only he happened to be an Irishman ? 
And what was the consequence ? My dear, 
I assure you, I came back unexpectedly 
from poor dear Kynaston's one day —at a 
moment's notice — having quarrelled with him 
over Home Rule or Education or something 
— poor dear Kynaston's what they call a 
Liberal, I believe — got at by that man 
Rosebery — and there didn't I find all the 
O'Flanagans, and O'Flahertys, and O'Flynns 
in the neighbourhood camping out in my 
drawing-room ; with a strong detachment 
of O'Donohues, dnd O'Dohertys, and 
O'Driscolls lying around loose in possess- 
ion of the library? Never leave a house 
to the servants, my dear ! It's positively 
suicidal. Put in a responsible caretaker of 
whom you know something — like Lois here, 
for instance." 

Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



66 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 




" NfcVKB LEAVE, A MOUSE TO THB SERVANTS* MY LUtAK 



11 Lois ! " Mrs, Evelegh echoed " Dear 
me, that*s just the very thing* What a 
capital idea ! I never thought of Lois ! She 
and Elsie might stop on here, with Ursula 
and the gardener" 

I protested that if we did it was our clear 
duty to pay a small rent ; but Mrs, Evelegh 
brushed that aside. w You've robbed your- 
selves over the bicycle," she insisted, "and 
Vm delighted to let you have it. It's I who 
ought to pay, for you'll keep the house dry 
for me." 

I remembered Mr, Hitchcock — M Mutual 
advantage ; benefits you, benefits me " — and 
made no bones about it So in the end 
Mrs. Evelegh set off for England with C^rile, 
leaving Elsie and me in charge of Ursula, 
the gardener, and the chalet 

As for Lady Georgina, having by this 
time completed her " cure * at Schfangenbad 
(complexion as usual j no guinea yellower), 
she telegraphed for Gretchen — "I can't do 
without the idiot " — and hung round Lucerne, 
apparently for no other purpose but to send 
people up the Briinig on the hunt for our 
wonderful new machines, and so put money 
in our pockets. She was much amused 
when I told her that Aunt Susan (who 
lived, you will remember, in respectable 
indigence at Black heath) had written to 
expostulate with me un my "unladylike" 
conduct in becoming a bicycle commission 
agent. " Unladylike ! " the Cantankerous 
CMd Lady exclaimed, with warmth. " What 
does the woman mean ? Has she got no 



by ^C 



Ic 



gumption? It's 'ladylike/ I sup- 
pose, to be a companion, or a 
governess, or a music-teacher, or 
something else in the black-thread- 
glove way, in London ; but not to 
sell bicycles for a good round 
commission. My dear, between 
you and me, I don't see it. If 
you had a brother, now, he might 
sell cycles, or corner wheat, or rig 
the share market, or do anything 
else he pleased, in these days, and 
no body ? d think the worse of him — 
as long as he made money ; and 
it's my opinion that what is sauce 
for the goose can't be far out for 
the gander — and vice-versa. Besides 
which, what's the use of trying to 
be ladylike ? You are a lady, child, 
and you couldn't help being one ; 
why trouble to be like what nature 
made you ? Tell Aunt Susan from 
me to put thai in her pipe and 
smoke it ! " 
I did tell Aunt Susan, by letter, giving 
Lady Georgina's authority for the statement ; 
and I really believe it had a consoling effect 
upon her ; for Aunt Susan is one of those 
innocent minded people who cherish a pro- 
found respect for the opinions and ideas of a 
I.ady of Title, Especially where questions 
of delicacy are concerned. It calmed her to 
think that though I, an officers daughter, had 
declined upon trade, 1 was mixing at least 
with the Best People ! 

We had a lovely time at the chalet— 
two girls alone, messing just as we pleased in 
the kitchen, and learning from Ursula how to 
concoct pot-au-fm in the most approved Swiss 
fashion. We pottered, as we women love to 
potter, half the day long ; the other half we 
spent in riding our cycles about the eternal 
hi!ls T and ensnaring the flics whom Lady 
Georgina dutifully sent up to us. She was 
our decoy duck ; and, in virtue of her handle, 
she decoyed to a marvel. Indeed, I sold so 
many Manitous that I began to entertain a 
deep respect for my own commercial faculties, 
As for Mr, Cyrus W, Hitchcock, he wrote to 
me from Frankfort : ''The world continues to 
revolve on its axis, the Manitou, and the 
machine is booming. Orders romp in daily. 
When you ventilated the suggestion of an 
agency at Li m burg, I concluded at a glance you 
had the material of a first-class business woman 
about you \ but I reckon 1 did not know 
what a traveller meant till you started on the 
road. I am now enlarging and altering this 
factory, to meet increased demands. Branch 

Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



MISS CAYLEY'S ADVENTURES. 



67 



offices at Berlin, Hamburg, Crefeld, and 
Diisseldorf. Inspect our stock before deal- 
ing elsewhere. A liberal discount allowed to 
the trade. Two hundred agents wanted in 
all towns of Germany. If they were every one 
of ihem like you, miss — well, I guess I 
would hire the town of Frankfort for my 
business premises." 

One morning, after we had spent about a 
week at the chalet by ourselves, I was sur- 
prised to see a young man with a knapsack 
on his back walking up the garden path 
towards our cottage. " Quick, quick, Elsie ! " 
I cried, being in a mischievous mood. "Come 
here with the opera-glass ! There's a Man in 
the offing ! " 

"A whatl" Elsie exclaimed, shocked as 
usual at mylevity. 

" A Man," I answered, squeezing her arm. 
" A Man ! A real live Man ! A specimen of 
the masculine gender in the human being ! 
Man, ahoy ! He has come at last— the lode- 
star of our existence ! " 

Next minute, I was sorry I spoke ; for as 
the man drew nearer, I perceived that he 
was endowed with very long legs and a 
languidly poetical bearing. That supercilious 
smile — that enticing moustache ! Could it 
be? — yes, it was— not a doubt of it— Harold 
Tillington ! 

I grew grave at once ; Harold Tillington 
and the situation were serious. " What can 
he want here ? " I exclaimed, drawing back. 

14 Who is it ? " Elsie asked ; for, being a 
woman, she read at once in my altered 
demeanour the fact that the Man was not 
unknown to me. 

" Lady Georgina's nephew," I answered, 
with a tell-tale cheek, I fear. " You remember 
I mentioned to you that I had met him at 
Schlangenbad. But this is really too bad of 
that wicked old Lady Georgina. She has 
told him where we lived and sent him up to 
see us." 

" Perhaps," Elsie put in, " he wants to 
charter a bicycle." 

I glanced at Elsie sideways. I had an 
uncomfortable suspicion that she said it slyly, 
like one who knew he wanted nothing of the 
sort But at any rate, I brushed the sugges- 
tion aside frankly. " Nonsense," I answered. 
" He wants me, not a bicycle." 

He came up to us, waving his hat. He 
did look handsome ! " Well, Miss Cayley," 
he cried, from afar, " I have tracked you to 
your lair ! I have found out where you 
abide ! What a beautiful spot ! And how 
well youVe looking ! " 

"This is an unexpected " I paused. 



by Google 



He thought I was going to say, " pleasure," 
but I finished it, "intrusion." His face fell. 
" How did you know we were at Lungern, 
Mr. Tillington ? " 

" My respected relative," he answered, 
laughing. "She mentioned — casually — " his 
eyes met mine — " that you were stopping in 
a chalet. And as I was on my way back to 
the diplomatic mill, I thought I might just 
as well walk over the Grimsel and the Furca, 
and then on to the Gotthard. The Court is 
at Monza. So it occurred to me ... . that 
in passing .... I might venture to drop in 
and say how-do-you-do to you." 

"Thank you," I answered, severely — but 
my heart spoke otherwise — " I do very well. 
And you, Mr. Tillington?" 

" Badly," he echoed. " Badly, since you 
went away from Schlangenbad." 

I gazed at his dusty feet. "You are 
tramping," I said, cruelly. " I suppose you 
will get forward for lunch to Meiringen ?" 

"I — I did not contemplate it." 

"Indeed?" 

He grew bolder. " No ; to say the truth, 
I half hoped I might stop and spend the 
day here with you." 

"Elsie," I remarked, firmly, "if Mr. 
Tillington persists in planting himself upon 
us like this, one of us must go and investigate 
the kitchen department." 

Elsie rose like a lamb. I have an im- 
pression that she gathered we wanted to be 
left alone. 

He turned to me imploringly. " Lois," he 
cried, stretching out his arms, with an appeal- 
ing air, " I may stay, mayn't I ? " 

I tried to be stern ; but I fear 'twas a feeble 
pretence. "We are two girls, alone in a 
house," I answered. "Lady Georgina, as a 
matron of experience, ought to have protected 
us. Merely to give you lunch is almost 
irregular. (Good diplomatic word, irregular.) 
Still, in these days, I suppose you may stay, 
if you leave early in the afternoon. That's 
the utmost I can do for you." 

"You are not gracious," he cried, gazing 
at me with a wistful look. 

I did not dare to be gracious. " Uninvited 
guests must not quarrel with their welcome," 
I answered, severely. Then the woman in me 
broke forth. " But indeed, Mr. Tillington, I 
am glad to see you." 

He leaned forward eagerly. " So you are 
not angry with me, Lois ? I may call you 
LoisV 

I trembled and hesitated. " I am not 
angry with you. I — I like you too much to 
be ever angry with you. And I am glad you 

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'l MAY STAY, MAYN'T 1?'* 



came — just this once — to see me. . . . Yes, 
— when we are alone — you may call me 
Lois." 

He tried to seize my hand. I withdrew it + 
u Then I may perhaps hope/ 1 he began, "that 
some day — — " 

I shook my head, " No> no," I said, regret- 
fully. " You misunderstand me. I like you 
very much ; and I like to see you. But as 
long as you are rich and have prospects like 
yours, I could never marry you + My pride 
wouldn't let me. Take that as final. 51 

I looked away. He bent forward again. 
" But if I were poor ? " he put in, eagerly. 

I hesitated. Then my heart rose, and I 
gave way, "If ever you are poor," I faltered, 
-"penniless, hunted, friendless — come to 
me, Harold, and I will help and comfort 
you. But not till then. Not till then, I 
implore you. 31 

He leant back and clasped his hands. 
" You have given me something to live for, 
dear Lois, J ' he murmured, " I will try to 
be poor— penniless, hunted, friendless. To 
win you I will try. And when that day 
arrives, I shall come to claim you," 

We sat for an hour and had a delicious 
talk — about nothing. But we understood 



by Google 



each other Only that artificial 
barrier divided us. At the end 
of the hour, I heard Elsie 
coming back by judiciously slow 
stages from the kitchen to the 
living-room, through six feet of 
passage, discoursing audibly to 
Ursula all the way, with a tardi- 
ness that did honour to her 
heart and her understanding. 
Dear kind, little Elsie ! I 
believe she had never a tiny 
romance of her own ; yet her 
sympathy for others was sweet 
to look upon. 

We lunched at a small deal table 
in the veranda. Around us rose 
the pinnacles. The scent of pines 
and moist moss was in the air. Elsie 
had arranged the flowers, and got 
ready the omelette, and cooked the 
chicken cutlets, and prepared the 
junket. " I never thought I could 
do it alone without you, Brownie ; 
but I tried, and it all came right by 
magic, somehow." We laughed and 
talked incessantly. Harold was in 
excellent cue ; and Elsie took to 
him* A livelier or merrier table 
there wasn't in the twenty - two 
Cantons that day than ours, under 
the sapphire sky, looking out on the sun- 
smitten snows of the Jungfrau. 

After lunch, Harold begged hard to be 
allowed to stop for tea. I had misgivings, 
but I gave way — he was such good company. 
One may as well be hanged for a sheep as a 
lamb, says the wisdom of our ancestors : and, 
after all, Mrs. Grundy was only represented 
here by Elsie, the gentlest and least censorious 
of her daughters, So he stopped and chatted 
till four ; when I made tea and insisted on 
dismissing him. He meant to take the rough 
mountain path over the screes from Lungern 
to Meiringen, which ran right behind the 
thakL I feared lest he might be belated, 
and urged him to hurry, 

£t Thanks, I'm happier here;" he answered 
I was sternness itself " You promised 
me ! " I said, in a reproachful voice. 

He rose instantly, and bowed. *'Your 
will is law — even when it pronounces sentence 
of exile," 

Would we walk a little way with him ? 
No, I faltered ; we would not. We would 
follow him with the opera-glasses and wave 
him farewell when he reached the Kulni. 
He shook our hands unwillingly, and turned 
up the little path, looking handsomer than 

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ever. It led ascending through a fir-wood to 
the rock-strewn hillside. 

Once, a quarter of an hour later, we caught 
a glimpse of him near a sharp turn in the 
road ; after that, we waited in vain, with our 
eyes fixed on the Kulm ; not a sign could 
we discern of him. At last I grew anxious. 
"He ought to be there," I cried, fuming. 

" He ought," Elsie answered. 

I swept the slopes with the opera-glasses. 
Anxiety and interest in him quickened my 
senses, I suppose. "Look here, Elsie," I 
burst out at last " Just take this glass and 
have a glance at those birds, down the crag 
below the Kulm. Don't they seem to be 
circling and behaving most oddly ? " 

Elsie gazed where I bid her. " They're 
wheeling round and round," she answered, 
after a minute ; "and they certainly do look 
as if they were screaming." 

t4 They seem to be frightened, " I suggested. 

" It looks like it, Brownie." 

" Then he's fallen over a precipice ! " I 
cried, rising up ; " and he's lying there on a 
ledge by their nest Elsie, we must go to 
him ! " 

She clasped her hands and looked terrified. 
" Oh, Brownie, how dreadful ! " she exclaimed. 
Her face was deadly white. Mine burned 
like fire. 

" Not a moment to lose ! " I said, holding 
my breath. " Get out the rope and let us 
run to him ! " 

" Don't you think," Elsie suggested, " we 
had better hurry down on our cycles to 
Lungern and call some men from the village 
to help us? We are two girls, and alone. 
What can we do to aid him ? " 

"No," I answered, promptly, "that won't 
do. It would only lose time — and time may 
be precious. You and I must go ; I'll send 
Ursula off to bring up guides from the 
village." 

Fortunately, we had a good long coil of 
new rope in the house, which Mrs. Evelegh 
had provided in case of accident. I slipped 
it on my arm, and set out on foot ; for the 
path was by far too rough for cycles. I was 
sorry afterwards that I had not taken 
Ursula, and sent Elsie to Lungern to rouse 
the men ; for she found the climbing hard, 
and I had difficulty at times in dragging her 
up the steep and stony pathway, almost a 
watercourse. However, we persisted in the 
direction of the Kulm, tracking Harold by 
his footprints ; for he wore mountain boots 
with sharp-headed nails, which made dints in 
the moist soil, and scratched the smooth 
surface of the rock where he trod on it 



by Google 



We followed him thus for a mile or two, 
along the regular path ; then of a sudden, in 
an open part, the trail failed us. I turned 
back, a few yards, and looked close, with my 
eyes fixed on the spongy soil, as keen as a 
hound that sniffs his way after his quarry. 
" He went off here, Elsie ! " I said at last, 
pulling up short by a spindle bush on the 
hillside. 

" How do you know, Brownie?" 

" Why, see, there are the marks of his 
stick ; he had a thick one, you remember, 
with a square iron spike. These are its 
dints ; I have been watching them all the 
way along from the chalet" 

" But there are so many such marks ! " 

" Yes, I know ; I can tell his from the 
older ones made by the spikes of alpenstocks 
because Harold's are fresher and sharper on 
the edge. They look so much newer. See, 
here, he slipped on the rock ; you can know 
that scratch is recent by the clean way it's 
traced, and the little glistening crystals still 
left behind in it. Those other marks have 
been wind-swept and washed by the rain. 
There are no broken particles." 

" How on earth did you find that out, 
Brownie ? " 

How on earth did I find it out ! I won- 
dered myself. But the emergency seemed 
somehow to teach me something of the 
instinctive lore of hunters and savages. I 
did not trouble to answer her. " At this 
bush, the tracks fail," I went on ; " and, 
look, he must have clutched at that branch 
and crushed the broken leaves as the twigs 
slipped through his fingers. He left the 
path here, then, and struck off on a short cut 
of his own along the hillside, lower down. 
Elsie, we must follow him." 

She shrank from it ; but I held her hand. 
It was a more difficult task to track him now ; 
for we had no longer the path to guide us. 
However, I explored the ground on my hands 
and knees, and soon found marks of foot- 
steps on the boggy patches, with scratches on 
the rock where he had leapt from point to point, 
or planted his stick to steady himself. I 
tried to help Elsie along among the littered 
boulders and the dwarf growth of wind-swept 
daphne : but, poor child, it was too much 
for her : she sat down after a few minutes 
upon the flat juniper scrub and began to 
cry. What was I to do ? My anxiety was 
breathless. I couldn't leave her there 
alone, and I couldn't forsake Harold. Yet 
I felt every minute might now be critical. 
We were making among wet whortleberry 
thicket and torn rock towards the spot where 

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I had seen the birds wheel and circle, scream- 
ing. The only way left was to encourage 
Elsie and make her feel the necessity for 
instant action. " He is alive still," I exclaimed, 
looking up; "the birds are crying! If he 
were dead, tht i y would return to their nest-- 
Elsie, we must get to him ! " 

She rose, bewildered, and followed me. I 
held her hand tight, and coaxed her to 
scramble over the rocks where the scratches 
showed the way, or to clamber at times over 
fallen trunks of huge fir trees, Yet it was 
hard work climbing ; even Harold's 
sure feet had slipped often on the 
wet and slimy boulders, 
though, like most of Queen 
Margherita's set, he was an 
expert mountaineer, Tln-n, 
at times, I lost the faint track, 
so that I had to 
diverge and look 
close to find it. 
These delays fretted 
me. "See, a stone 
loosed from its bed 
— he must have , 

passed by here 

That twig 

is newly snapped ; 
no doubt he caught 

at it Ha, 

the moss there has 
been crushed ; a 
foot has gone by. 
And the ants on 
that ant-hill, with 
their eggs in their 
mouths — a man's 
tread has frightened 
them," So, by some 
instinctive sense, as 
if the spirit of my 
savage ancestors 
revived within me, 
I managed to re- 
cover the spoor again and again by a miracle, 
till at last, round a corner by a defiant cliff — - 
with a terrible foreboding, my heart stood still 
within me. 

We had come to an end. A great pro- 
jecting buttress of crag rose sheer in front. 
Above lay loose boulders. Below was a shrub- 
hung precipice. The birds we had seen from 
home were still circling and screaming, 

They were a pair of peregrine hawks. 
Their nest seemed to lie far below the broken 
scar, some sixty or seventy feet beneath us. 

" He is not dead ! " I cried once more, with 
my heart in my mouth, " If he were, they 



would have returned* He has fallen, and is 
lying, alive, below there!" 

Elsie shrank back against the wall of rock. 
I advanced on my hands and knees to the 
edge of the precipice. It was not quite sheer, 




1 ADVANCED ON' MY HANDS A I 
KM-ES Tp THE EDGE OF THE 
I'RECIPICE.'* 



by Google 



but it dropped like a sea- 
cliff, with broken ledges. 

I could see where 

Harold had slipped. He 

had tried to climb round 

the crag that blocked 

the road, and the ground at the edge of 

the precipice had given way with him ; 

it showed a recent founder of a few 

inches. Then he clutched at a branch 

of broom as he fell ; but it slipped through 

his fingers, cutting them ; for there was 

blood on the wiry stem. I knelt by the side 

of the cliflf and craned my head over* I 

scarcely dared to look. In spite of the birds, 

my heart misgave me. 

There, on a ledge deep below, he lay in a 
mass, half raised on one arm. But not dead, 
I believed. " Harold !" I cried. "Harold!" 
He turned his face up and saw me j his 
eyes lighted with joy. He shouted back 
something, but I could not hear it. 

I turned to Elsie, " I must go down to 
him ! n 

Her tears rose again. " Oh, Brownie ! " 
I unwound the coil of rope. The first 

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thing was to fasten it I could not trust to 
Ebie to hold it ; she was too weak and too 
frightened to bear my weight : even if I 
wound it round her body, I feared my 
mere mass might drag her over. I 
peered about at the surroundings. No tree 
grew near; no rock had a pinnacle sufficiently 
safe to depend upon. But I found a 
plan soon. In the crag behind me was 
a cleft, narrowing wedge -shape as it 
descended. I tied tht end of the rope 
round a stone, a good big water worn 
stone, rudely girdled with a groove near 
the middle, which prevented it from 
slipping ; then I drop- 
ped it down the fissure 
till it jammed ; after 
which, I tried it to see 
if it would bear. It 
was firm as the rock 
itself, I let the rope 
down by it, and waited 
a moment to discover 
whether Harold could 
climb. He shook his 
head, and took a note- 
book with evident pain 
from his pocket. Then 
he scribbled a few 
words, and pinned 
them to the rope, I 
hauled it up. "Can't #'/. 

move. Either severely 
bruised and sprained, 
or else legs broken." 

There was no help 
for it, then. I must go 
to him. 

My first idea was 
merely to glide down 
the rope with my gloved 
hands, for I chanced to 
have my dog-skin 
bicycling gloves in my 
pocket. Fortunately, 
however, I did not 
carry out this crude 
idea too hastily; for 
next instant it occurred 
to me that I could not 
swarm up again, I 
have had no practice tn 
rope-climbing. Here was a problem. But 
the moment suggested its own solution, I 
began making knots, or rather nooses or 
loops, in the rope at intervals of about 
eighteen inches. u What are they for?" 
Elsie asked, looking on in wonder, 

"Footholds, to climb up by," 




I Gkll J'i-.l* THE ROPE AND LET MYSELF DOWN. 



by Google 



" But the ones above will pull out with 
your weight." 

" I don't think so. Still, to make sure, I 
shall tie them with this string. I must get 
down to him/ J 

I threaded a sufficient number of loops, 
trying the length over the edge. Then I said 
to Elsie, who sat cower- 
ing, propped against 
the crag, "You must 
come and look over, 
and do as I wave to 
you. Mind, dear, you 
must! Two lives 
depend upon it." 

"Brownie, I daren't! 
I shall turn giddy and 
fall over!" 

I smoothed her 
golden hair, M Elsie, 
dear," I said, gently, 
gating into her blue 
eyes, "you are a 
woman, A woman can 
always be brave, where 
those she loves are con- 
cerned ; and I believe 
you love me, IJ I led 
her, coaxingly, to the 
edge, " Sit there," I 
said, in my quietest 
voice, so as not to 
alarm her. "You can 
lie at full length, if you 
like, and only just peep 
over. But when I wave 
my hand, remember, 
you must pull the rope 
up," 

She obeyed me like 
a child. I knew she 
loved me, 

I gripped the rope 
and let myself down, 
not using the loops 
to descend, but just 
sliding with hands and 
knees, and allowing the 
knots to slacken my 
pace. Half-way down, 
I will confess, the 
eerie feeling of physical 
suspense was horrible. One hung so in mid- 
air ! The hawks flapped their wings. But 
Harold was below ; and a woman can always 
be brave where those she loves— well, just 
that moment, catching my breathy I knew I 
loved Harold. 

I glided down swiftly. The air whizzed 

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At last, on a narrow shelf of rock, I leant 
over him. He seized my hand. " I knew 
you would come ! " he cried. " I felt sure 
you would find out. Though, how you found 
out, Heaven only knows, you clever, brave 
little woman ! " 

" Are you terribly hurt ? " I asked, bending 
close. His clothes were torn. 

"I hardly know. I can't move. It may 
only be bruises." 

" Can you climb by these nooses with my 
help?" 

He shook his head. " Oh, no. I couldn't 
climb at all. I must be lifted, somehow. 
You had better go back to Lungern and 
bring men to help you." 

" And leave you here alone ! Never, 
Harold ; never ! " 

** Then what can we do ?" 

I reflected a moment. " Lend me your 
pencil," I said. He pulled it out —his arms 
were almost unhurt, fortunately. I scribbled 
a line to Elsie. " Tie my plaid to the rope 
and let it down." Then I waved to her to 
pull up again. 

I was half surprised to find she obeyed the 
signal, for she crouched there, white-faced 
and open-mouthed, watching ; but I have 
often observed that women are almost always 
brave in the great emergencies. She pinned 
on the plaid and let it down with commend- 
able quickness. I doubled it, and tied firm 
knots in the four corners, so as to make it 
into a sort of basket ; then I fastened it at 
each corner with a piece of the rope, crossed 
in the middle, till it looked like one of the 
cages they use in mills for letting down sacks 
with. As soon as it was finished, I said, 
" Now, just try to crawl into it." 

He raised himself on his arms and crawled 
in with difficulty. His legs dragged after 
him. I could see he was in great pain. But 
still, he managed it. 

I planted my foot in the first noose. " You 
must sit still," I said, breathless. " I am 
going back to haul you up." 

" Are you strong enough, Lois ? " 

"With Elsie to help me, yes. I stroked 
our boat at Girton." 

" I can trust you," he answered. It thrilled 
me that he said so. 

I began my hazardous journey ; I mounted 
the rope by the nooses— one, two, three, four, 
counting them as I mounted. I did not dare 
to look up or down as I did so, lest I should 
grow giddy and fall, but kept my eyes fixed 
firmly always on the one noose in front of 
me. My brain swam : the rope swayed and 
creaked. Twenty, thirty, forty ! Foot after 



by Google 



foot, I slipped them in mechanically, taking 
up with me the longer coil whose ends were 
attached to the cage and Harold. My hands 
trembled ; it was ghastly, swinging there 
between earth and heaven. Forty-five, forty- 
six, forty-seven — I knew there were forty-eight 
of them. At last, after some weeks, as it 
seemed, I reached the summit. Tremulous 
and half dead, I prised myself over the edge 
with my hands, and knelt once more on the 
hill beside Elsie. 

She was white, but attentive. "What 
next, Brownie ? " Her voice quivered. 

I looked about me. I was too faint and 
shaky after my perilous ascent to be fit for 
work, but there was no help for it What could 
I use as a pulley ? Not a tree grew near ; but 
the stone jammed in the fissure might once 
more serve my purpose. I tried it again. 
It had borne my weight ; was it strong enough 
to bear the precious weight of Harold ? I 
tugged at it, and thought so. I passed the 
rope round it like a pulley, and then tied it 
about my own waist. I had a happy thought : 
I could use myself as a windlass. I turned 
on my feet for a pivot. Elsie helped me to 
pull. " Up you go ! " I cried, cheerily. We 
wound slowly, for fear of shaking him. Bit 
by bit, I could feel the cage rise gradually 
from the ground ; its weight, taken so, with 
living capstan and stone axle, was less than I 
should have expected. But the pulley 
helped us, and Elsie, spurred by need, put 
forth more reserve of nervous strength than 
I could easily have believed lay in that tiny 
body. I twisted myself round and round, 
close to the edge, so as to look over from 
time to time, but not at all quickly, for fear 
of dizziness. The rope strained and gave. 
It was a deadly ten minutes of suspense and 
anxiety. Twice or thrice as I looked 
down I saw a spasm of pain break over 
Harold's face ; but when I paused and 
glanced inquiringly, he motioned me to go 
on with my venturesome task. There was 
no turning back now. We had almost got 
him up when the rope at the edge began to 
creak ominously. 

It was straining at the point where it grated 
against the brink of the precipice. My heart 
gave a leap. If the rope broke, all was over. 

With a sudden dart forward, I seized it 
with my hands, below the part that gave ; then 
— one fierce little run back — and I brought 
him level with the edge. He clutched at 
Elsie's hand. I turned thrice round, to wind 
the slack about my body. The taut rope cut 
deep into my flesh ; but nothing mattered 
now, except to save him. " Catch the cloak, 

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Elsie ! " I cried ; " catch it : pull him gently 
in I " Elsie caught it and pulled him in, with 
wonderful pluck and calmness. We hauled 
him over the edge* He lay safe on the bank. 
Then we all three broke down and cried like 
children together, I took his hand in mine 
and held it in silence. 

When we found words again I drew a deep 
breath, and said, simply, u How did you 
manage to do it?" 

"I tried to clamber 
past the wall that 
barred the way there 
by sheer force of 
stride— you know, my 
legs are long — and 
I somehow over- 
balanced myself. But 
I didn't exactly fall 
—if I had fallen, I 
must have been 
killed ; I rolled and 
slid down, clutching 
at the weeds in the 
crannies as I slipped, 
and stumbling over 
the projections, with- 
out quite losing my 
foothcrkl on the 
ledges, till I found 
myself brought up 
short with a bump at 
the end of it." 

" And you think no 
bones are broken ? M 

"I can't feel sure. 
It hurts me horribly 
to move. I fancy 
Just at first I must 
have fainted, I kit 
Fm inclined to guess 
Vm only sprained and 
bruised and sore all 
over. Why, you're as 
bad as me, I believe. 
See, your dear hands 
are all torn and 
bleeding ! " 

"How are we ever 
to get him back 

again, Brownie?" Elsie put in. She was 
paler than ever now, and prostrate with the 
after-effects of her unwonted effort. 

"You are a practical woman, Elsie," I 
answered. M Stop with \i\vn here a minute 
en two. I'll climb up the hillside nnd halloo 
for Ursula and the men from Lungern." 

1 climbed and hallooed, In a few minutes, 
worn out as I was T I had reached the path 




YoL 



--10, 



by Google 



above and attracted their attention. They 
hurried down to where Harold lay, and, 
using my cage for a litter, slung on a young 
fir-trunk, curried him back between them 
across their shoulders to the village. He 
pleaded hard to be allowed to remain at the 
chaki, and Elsie joined her prayers to his ; 
but, there, I was adamant it was not so 
much what people might say that I minded, 

but a deeper difficulty. 
For if once I nursed 
him through this 
trouble, how could I 
or nny woman in my 
place any longer 
refuse him ? So I 
passed him ruthlessly 
on to Lungern 
(though my heart 
ached for it), and 
telegraphed at once 
to his nearest relative, 
Lady Georgina } to 
come up and take 
care of him. 

He recovered 
rapidly, Though sore 
and shaken, his worst 
hurts, it turned out, 
were sprains ; and in 
three or four days he 
was ready to go on 
again, I called to see 
him before he left, I 
dreaded the inter- 
view ; for one's own 
heart is a hard enemy 
to fight so long : but 
how could I let him 
go without one word 
of farewell to him ? 

"After this, Lois," 
he said, taking my 
hand in his— and I 
was weak enough, fur 
a moment, to let it lie 
there — - " you cannot 
say No to me ! " 

Oh, how I longed 
to fling myself upon 
him and cry out, " No, Harold, I cannot ! I 
love you too dearly ! " But his future and 
Marmaduke Ashurst's half million restrained 
me: for his sake and for my own, I held 
myself in courageously. Though, indeed, it 
needed some courage and self-control. I 
withdrew my hand slowly, " Do you remem- 
ber," I said, 4t you asked me that first day 
at Schlangenbad " — it was an epoch to 
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me now, that first day—" whether I was 
medieval or modern ? And I answered, 
* Modern, I hope. f And you said, ■ That's well ! ' 
-You set-, I doirt forget the least things you 
say to me. Well, because I am modern — " 
my lips trembled and belied me — * 4 1 can 
answer you No. I can even now refuse you. 
The old-fashioned girl, the mediaeval girl, 
would have held that because she had saved 
your life (if I did save your life, which 
is a matter of opinion) she was bound to 
marry you. But / am modern, and I see 
things differently. If there were reasons at 
Schlangenbad which made it impracticable 
for me to accept you — though my heart 
pleaded hard — I do not deny it — those 
reasons cannot have disappeared merely 
because you have chosen to fall over a 
precipice, and I have pulled you up again. 
My decision was founded, you see, not on 
passing accidents of situation, but on 
permanent considerations, Nothing has 
happened in the last three days to affect 
those considerations. We are still our- 
selves : you, rich ; I, a penniless adven- 
turess. I could not accept you when you 
asked me at Schlangenbad, On just the 
,same grounds, I cannot accept you now. 1 
do not see how the unessential fact that 1 
made myself into a winch to pull you up the 
cliff, and that I am still smarting for it " 

He looked me all over comically, " How 
severe we are ! " he cried, in a bantering tone. 
' l And how- extremely Girtony ! A System 
of Logic, Rati oci native and Inductive, by 
Lois Cayley ! What a pity we didn't take a 
professor's chair. My child, that isn't you I 
It's not yourself at all ! It's an attempt to 
be unnaturally and unfemininely reasonable. ?J 

Logic fled. I broke down utterly. 
" Harold," I cried, rising, "I love you ! I 



admit I love you ! But I will never marry 
you — while you have those thousands, or 
the chance of inheriting them." 

" I haven't got them yet ! * 

He smothered my hand with kisses— for I 
withdrew my face- " If you admit you love 
me," he cried, quite joyously, u then all is 
well. When once a woman admits that, the 
rest is but a matter of time — and, Lois, I can 
wait a thousand years for you," 

"Not in my case/' I answered, through ray 
tears. "Not in my case, Harold ! I am a 
modern woman, and what I say I mean. I 
will renew my promise. If ever you are poor 
and friendless, come to me ; I am yours* 
Till then, don't harrow me by asking me the 
impossible ! " 

I tore myself away. At the hall door, 
Ijidy Georgina intercepted me. She glanced 
at my red eyes. "Then you have taken 
him ? ;I she cried, seizing my hand* 

I shook my head firmly. I could hardly 
speak. "No, Lady Georgina/' I answered, 
in a choking voice, u I have refused him 
again. I will not stand in his way. I will 
not ruin his prospects." 

She drew back and let her chin drop. 
" Well, of all the hard -hen rted, cruel, obdurate 
young women I ever saw in my born days, if 
you're not the very hardest — — " 

I half ran from the house, I hurried home 
to the chakt. There, I dashed into my own 
room, locked the door behind me, flung 
myself wildly on my bed, and, burying my 
face in my hands, had a good, long, hard- 
hearted, cruel, obdurate cry— exactly like 
any other mediaeval woman. It's all very 
well being modern ; but my experience is 
that, when it comes to a man one loves — well, 
the Middle Ages are still horribly strong 
within us. 




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Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



From Behind the Speakers Chair. 

XLV. 

(VIEWED BY HENRY W. LUCY.) 



THE RENT 
IN THE 
LIBERAL 

temple: 

BEHIND 

THE VEIL. 



THE publication in the April 
Number of The Strand Maga- 
zine of certain facts connected 
with the early appearance of the 
rift in the Liberal lute which, 
slowly widening, made its music 
mute, has brought me several 
communications of historical interest From 
these I arn permitted to frame a fuller narra- 
tive of a political event which in national 
importance, in influence on the careers of 
individuals, and in dramatic effect finds its 
nearest parallel in Sir Robert Peel's conver- 
sion to Free Trade 
and what followed 
thereupon. 

In the middle of 
December, 1885, 
what was subse- 
quently recogni sed 
as a batl&n d^essai 
was sent up from 
Leeds announcing 
that Mr. Gladstone 
had determined to 
celebrate the 
Liberal triumph at 
the General Elec- 
tion by bringing in 
a measure con- 
ferring Home Rule 
upon Ireland. This 
was circumspectly 
denied* But the 
Whig section of the 
Liberal Party, of 
whom I^rd Part- 
ington and Mr 
Goschen were re- 




T«B WHIGS TAKE FRIGHT* 



presentatives, took 

fright. I^ord Hart- 

ington found an opportunity of publicly 

announcing that " no proposals on the 

policy to be adopted by the Liberal Party in 

reference to the demand of a large number 

of Irish representatives for the legislative 



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independence of Ireland " had been com- 
municated to him. As the weeks slipped by 
doubt deepened into certainty. The Whig 
wing of the Liberal Party drew farther apart 
from Mr. Gladstone. The situation was 
accentuated when, on the 26th of January, 
1886, Lord Salisbury, who, in spite of heavy 
defeat at the poll, had met the new Parlia- 
ment as Premier, was with his Government 
overthrown. 

It was Mr. Jesse Collings who led the 
attack, his battle flag proudly emblazoned with 
the famous design of three acres and a cow. 

Behind him stood 
Mr, Chamberlain. 
Lord Hartington 
and Mr, (Jose hen 
spoke against the 
amendment, and 
were accompanied 
into the Ministerial 
division lobby by 
Sir Henry James. 
When, a week later, 
Mr. Gladstone 
formed his Ad- 
ministration, Lord 
Hartington and Sir 
Henry James de- 
clined to join it, 
1 he latter sacrificing 
for conscience' 
sake the prize of 
the Woolsack. 
Ml Chamberlain 
and Sir George 
Trevelyan, accept- 
i n g what they 
understood as 
assurances that the 
now inevitable 
Home Rule Bill would not imperil the unity 
of the Empire/ joined Mr. Gladstone's 
Cabinet, one as President of the Local 
Government Board, the other as Secretary 
for Scotland. 

Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



?6 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 




JESSE COLUxSCS LEADS THE ATTACK, 



On the 27th of March these two Ministers 
resigned. In Cabinet Council they had 
learned the full truth about the Home Rule 
Bill. When it was first drafted it contained 
a clause establishing the supremacy of the 
Imperial Parliament, and retaining at West- 
minster the collaboration of the Irish 
members. In a slightly modified form this 
clause appeared in the second draft of the 
BJIL In the third and final form Mr. 
Gladstone, yielding to the imperative con- 
ditions of Mr. Parnell, master of eighty-six 
votes, eliminated the clause. Whereupon Mr. 
Chamberlain and Mr. Trevelyan withdrew, 

This brief rhume of events is 
necessary for the full understand- 
ing of the narrative that follows. 
The public have during the past 
ten years grown so accustomed 
to finding Mr, Chamberlain and the peer who 
was Lord Harrington working together in the 
unity of Liberal Unionism, that they are apt 
to suppose the same conditions existed from 
the first As a matter of fact, in February, 
1 886, Mr. Chamberlain was as widely dis- 
severed from Lord Harrington as a month 
later he came to be parted from Mr. Glad- 
stone. The Radical Anti-Home Rulers, 
following his lead, were bitterly resentful of 
the Whig Anti-Home Rulers, captained by 
Lord Harrington, a feeling accentuated by 
the vote given by them on Mr. Jesse Col lirags's 
amendment to the Address, which made an 
end of Lord Salisbury's foredoomed Adminis- 
tration. 



WHIG AND 
RADICAL 
BISSBH- 

TIENT5. 



This was Mr. Gladstone's opportunity, used 
in the fitful negotiations that almost recaptured 
the Radicals. Lord Harrington and his friends 
in council didn't want Home Rule on any 
terms. Mr. Chamberlain and his more than 
half -hundred Radical followers were quite 
willing to give Ireland Home Rule if the 
control of the Imperial Parliament were 
jealously conserved. 

This state of things existed 
a flag up to Monday, the 10th of 
of truce. May, 1886, on which day 
Mr. Gladstone rose to move 
the second reading of his Bill. The position 
of the Government was critical There 
were ninety-three Liberals who had declared 
against the Bill. If they carried their objec- 
tion as Tar as the division lobby it would be 
thrown out, and Mr. Gladstone and his 
Government must go with it. Many dis- 
cerned the dire peril of the Liberal Party* 
One perceived a way of averting it. This 
was Mr. Labouchere, who, whilst an uncom- 
promising Home Ruler, at the time enjoyed 
the confidence of Mr, Chamberlain. He 
appointed to himself the task of re- 
uniting the Radical section of the Liberal 
Unionists with what later came to be known 
as the Gladstonians. The fissure had opened 
on the question of the retention of Irish 
members at Westminster. If Mr. Gladstone 
gave way on that point all might be well. 

In conference with his colleagues the 
Premier finally agreed to the adoption of 
provisions whereby the Irish members should 




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MR. LABOL'CHERK AS THE MESSENGER Of THE GOD 3, 

Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



FROM BEHIND THE SPEAKER'S CHAIR. 



77 



sit and vote on questions of Imperial range, 
including matters of finance On Saturday, 
the 8th of May, Mr, labouchere, having 
obtained this assurance in Downing Street, 
sought an interview with Mr* Chamberlain, 
who after some hesitation consented to accept 
this understanding as a basis of reconcilia- 
tion* The agreement was put in wruing r 
Mr. Chamberlain dictating the terms, Mr. 
labouchere acting as scribe — an arrange- 
ment which recalls the circumstances under 
which what is known in history as the 
Benedetti Treaty was committed to paper, 
Mr. Labouchere, having carried this flag of 
truce to Downing Street, went off to the 
country for a Sunday's rest, which he felt he 
had well earned. 

Coming back to 
A town on the 

hitch, memorable 
Monday, the 
mom of the day on which 
the second reading of the 
Home Rule Bill was to be 
moved in terms and upon 
conditions that would bring 
back to the fold the strayed 
sheep, Mr. Labouchere dis- 
covered that his patriotic 
labour was undone. A 
note from Mr. Chamberlain 
awaited him, bitterly com- 
plaining that Mr. Gladstone 
was backing out, an 
assurance bas-d on what purported to be 
an authorized paragraph in one of the 
Ix>ndon papers, in which Mr, Gladstone 
was represented as protesting that he 
had yielded on no point connected with 
his BilL Mr. labouchere made haste to 
communicate with the Liberal Whip, and 
learned what had happened whilst he was 
spending a peaceful Sabbath day on die 
banks of the Thames* It had been brought 
iu Mr, Gladstone's knowledge that Mr. 
Chain berlain, after his interview with Mr. 
labouchere on the Saturday, sent round to 
his friends a telegram announcing ^absolute 
surrender " on the part of the Premier. 
Captain O'Shea received one of these 
messages. He showed it to Parnell, who 
sent it on to Mr. Gladstone. 

The great statesman was, after all, only 
human. At this epoch he had been con- 
vinced of the impossibility of carrying, against 
the defection of a powerful section of his 
followers, the Home Rule Bill in its original 
form. He was ready to compromise. But 
those familiar with his constitutional ten- 



MORE 

NEGOTIxX- 

TIONS. 




CAPTMN OSHEA. 

Fmn a SietUrh mode at tt* Pmiuil Commiukm. 



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dencies will understand how desperately he 
struggled against any appearance of being 
overcome in fight, more especially by a 
former lieutenant, and that lieutenant Mr. 
Chamberlain. When the emissary of the 
newspaper brought him news of the currency 
of this telegram, and asked if it were true, 
the temptation to Mr. Gladstone to con- 
vince himself that he had yielded nothing 
would be irresistible. 

When this bult from the blue 
swiftly descended, threatening to 
destroy the edifice of peace care- 
fully built up, the architect turned 
to Mr. Gladstone, He found the Premier 
was staying with a friend at Sheen. Thither 
was dispatched a messenger 
on a swift horse with an 
account of the new dilemma 
and request for instructions. 
Mr. Gladstone replied, it 
was quite true he had agreed 
to two alterations in his Rill 
— (i) allowing Irish mem- 
bers to vote on Imperial 
matters \ (2) on finance of 
an Imperial character. The 
first amendment he under- 
took to draw up himself. 
The second he said he did 
not fully comprehend. If 
Mr. Chamberlain would 
formulate his demand in 
the shape of a clause, 
he did not doubt that he would be able 
to accept it. Mr. Labouchere brought this 
proposal to Mr. Chamberlain, who plainly 
denounced it as an effort to shirk the 
question, reading toto Mr. Gladstone's letter 
a determination not to adopt the second 
amendment, 

Mr. I^ah ouch ere, industrious, Su- 
ms appoint- domi table, did not despair All 
ment. was not lost as long as the Bill 
awaited the second reading. If 
Mr. Gladstone would only announce intention 
of dropping the Bill after its broad principle 
had been approved by a vote on the second 
reading, it might be brought up again next 
Session, with reconstruction of the 24th and 
39th Clauses meeting the objection of Mr. 
Chamberlain and his friends. On such 
understanding the fifty-five Radicals who 
followed Mr. Chamberlain would vote for the 
second reading, crisis would be averted, the 
Ministry would be saved, the Session might 
be appropriated for other business, and the 
work approached on safer grounds in 1887. 
On the eve of the motion for the second 
Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



78 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



reading, Mr. Labouchere believed he had 
Mr* Gladstone's definite and distinct assur- 
ance that he would take this course. It is 
difficult to believe that so shrewd a man, one 
so well versed in affairs, can have been 
deceived on this important point. 
What happened in the interval 
between Mr. Labouchere's last 
message from the Premier and the 
delivery of the speech in the House 
of Commons ? Perhaps if Mr, 
Parnell were alive and in communi- 
cative mood, he might tell- How- 
ever it be, the Radicals below the 
Gangway sat straining their ears for 
the promised words of concession and 
conciliation. They were not spoken, 
and when Mr. Gladstone resumed his 
seat after moving the second reading 
of his Bill, it was felt that all was over. 
This is the scene described in the 
April Number. I may add that the 
member deputed by Mr. Chamber- 
lain to follow Mr. Gladstone, and 
accept the flag of truce he was 
expected to hold out, was Sir Lewis 
Mclver, then Radical member for 
Torquay, a member who, in a quiet, 
effective way, had much to do with 
the Radical revolt against the BilL 
Mr. labouchere, through the Whip, sent Mr. 
Gladstone a message on the Treasury Bench 
to inform him that the ambiguity of his phrase 
had wrought final and fatal mischief. Mr, 
Gladstone privily replied that he had meant 
it to be clearly understood that the Irish 
members were to sit at West- 
minster, Somehow or other 
the accustomed master - of 
plain English had failed to 
make himself understood. 
Prepared to yield, he wanted 
things to look as little as 
possible like surrender, and 
so the opportunity of building 
the golden bridge sped Mr. 
Gladstone suggested that Lord 
Herschell should have an 
interview with Mr. Chamber- 
lain t when all would be ex- 
plained. Mr. Chamberlain 
hotly replied that he would 
have no more negotiation, 
but would vote against the Bill. 

At a meeting of the Liberal 
Party, held at the Foreign Office, 
on the 27th of May, the second 
reading debate being still in pro- 
gress, Mr. Gladstone said what 




S]H LEWIS HCIVER. 




MR, Win THREAD. 



THE 

FOREIGN 

OFFICE 

MEETING, 



by C^OOgle 



he surprisingly omitted to say on moving the 
second reading. He asserted in the most 
emphatic manner the supremacy of the 
Imperial Legislature, and promised to frame 
a plan that would entitle Irish members to 
sit and vote at Westminster when 
Imperial questions arose, or when 
any proposal for taxation affecting 
the condition of Ireland was sub- 
mitted. He even offered to withdraw 
the Bill before going to a second 
reading. 

These were the points of his con- 
cession. Wrapped up in a speech 
an hour long, they still had about 
them a disquieting air of mistiness, 
Desiring to put the matter in a nut- 
shell, Mr. W hi thread, at the con- 
clusion of the speech, rose and said, 
" Then we understand that the Irish 
will sit at Westminster ? " 

14 Mr. Gladstone positively glared 
upon his interrogator" (I quote from 
the private notes of a member who 
was present), " * I do not, 1 he said, 
1 understand the technicalities of 
drafting, so I will read again what I 
am prepared to do/ Then he re- 
read the passage laboriously turned 
so that it might appear that, whilst 
conceding the demands of Chamberlain 
and his party, he was really doing nothing 
more than what he had contemplated from 
the first, the alterations in the Bill being 
quite immaterial In short, having been right 
in proposing that Irish members should not 
sit at Westminster, he was 
equally right in now promising 
that they should" 

On the 31st of 
too May a meeting 
late ! of the Radical 
Party was held in 
one of the Committee-rooms 
of the House of Commons in 
order to decide what course 
they should adopt in the 
approaching division. Rarely 
has so momentous a meeting 
been held under the roof of 
the Palace at Westminster. 
These fifty-five men held the 
fate of the Government in 
If they voted with Mr, Glad- 
stone, the second reading of the Home Rule 
Bill would be triumphantly carried. If they 
abstained, it would creep through and the 
Ministry would be saved. If they voted against 
it, the Bill must go and the Ministry with it 

Original from 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



their hands. 



FROM BEHIND THE SPEAKER'S CHAIR. 



79 



AH this was clear enough. None in the 
room, nor any waiting at the doors to hear 
the decision t had the slightest forecast of the 
momentous events hanging on their decision ; 
changes amounting to a revolution of English 
political parties, accompanied by 
far-reaching consequences at home 
and abroad. 

Mr. Chamberlain submitted the 
issue in a speech which one 
present tells me was a 
model of judicial impar- 
tiality* There were open to 
them, he said, the familiar 
three courses. They might 
vote for the Bill ; they 
might vo?e against it ; they 
might abstain from the divi- 
sion lobby, He advocated 
no one of the three, con- 
fining himself to the task 
of summarizing the conse- 
quences that would severally 
follow. He suggested that 
in coming to a decision 
the process of the second 
ballot should be adopted 
division of the fifty- five 




JOSEPH ADDRESSING HIS BflETHRKN. 
A HISTORICAL FRAGMENT. 



the secret negotiations with Mr. Gladstone, 
which were conducted exclusively with Mr. 
Chamberlain's section, I have the best 
reason to know that these began and ended 
without the personal knowledge of Lord 
Harrington and his inner 
council, who learned the 
facts for the first time from 
the April Number of The 
Strand Magazine. 

On referring to 
u Annals of Our 
Time," I find 
under date 3 1 st 
May, i886 3 that the figures 
in the divisions taken at 
the fateful meeting of 
Radical Dissentients, pre- 
sided over by Mr. Cham- 
berlain on the eve of the 
second reading, slightly vary 
from my account. It was 
rumoured in the Lobby of 
the House of Commons 
that fifty - four members 



MR. 

bright's 

LETTER, 



DIVISION ON 

THL SECOND; 

READING 



On the first 
members present 
three voted in favour of the Bill, thirty-nine 
against it, thirteen electing to abstain. On a 
second vote, the three who had voted in 
favour of the Bill stood by their guns. Of 
the abstainers nine went over to the stalwarts, 
and the die was cast 

Shortly after the stroke of one 
o'clock on the morn- 
ing of June 8th the 
House divided , and a 
second reading was refused the 
Home Rule Bill by 343 votes 
against 31 j. Of the majority 
there were 250 Conservatives 
and ninety - three Dissentient 
Liberals, Of these last fifty-five 
were followers of Mr. Chamber- 
lain, forty-eight men whom on 
other platforms and in times 
not long past they angrily de- 
nounced as Whigs. They were 
now united under a common 
flag* and have to this day, with 
few notable defections, remained 
in unity. 

It is important to note that the 
two sections came together for 
the first time in avowed alliance 
at a meeting hefd at Devon- 
shire House on the 14th of 
May, 1886, some time after 



met ; that three declared 



for the second reading ; twelve would abstain ; 
and that thirty-eight were in favour of voting 
against it This it will he observed accounts 
for only fifty-three. The figures I give are 
supplied by a member who took a leading 
part in the revolt. 

li A great impression," it is written in the 
" Annals, 1 * " was made by a letter from Mr. 
Bright, who stated that though he would not 
speak he would vote against the 
Bill/' I have had communicated 
to me some curious particulars 
about that unpublished letter* 
the importance of which upon 
the history of the country can 
scarcely be exaggerated, In 
those troubled times, on the eve 
of the dissolution of life -long 
friendships, one surpassing all, 
Mr. Bright could not bring him- 
self to resume his attendance 
at the House of Commons. He 
spent his evenings at the Reform 
Club, an arrangement being 
made that Mr, W. S. Caine, who 
acted as Whip of the inchoate 
party, should see him every 
evening about nine o'clock, and 
report progress. The final 
meeting of the Chamber- 
la mites having been decided 
jcA upon — by a striking coin- 

JIKh CAINE KEEPING MR. BRIGHT ADVISED. . ClQeilCe it WaS nCJlCl 

1 /xrkiil - unqma fr 

3y ^OOglC 




Ungmal trorm 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



So 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



THE 
FRIENDLY 
BROKER. 



Committee-room No, 15, at a later stage 
famous in connection with another episode 
of the Irish question — Mr, Caine saw Mr. 
Bright, and begged him £0 attend it. Mr. 
Bright declined, but agreed to write a letter 
that might be read at the gathering. After it 
had been read it was destroyed, no copy being 
kept. T here w as a re port cur r en t 
at the time that an enterprising 
journal had offered Mr. Caine 
^joo for the text of the letter. 
Mr, Bright was not 
permitted to receive 
exclusive informa- 
tion from Mr Caine 
of w T hat was going forward at 
this crisis, Mr. Labouchere, 
the friendly broker throughout 
the whole business, posted off 
to the Reform Club as soon as 
he heard the decision arrived 
at by the Radical meeting on 
the 31st May. 

"What have they done?" 
eagerly asked Mr. Bright, as 
he entered 

"They have resolved to vote against the 
Bill/' said Mr, Labouchere 

According to Mr, 1 Ahouchere's account of 
this interview, given at the time to a friend 
who permits me to use his notes, Mr. Bright 
expressed regret at this conclusion. The 
purport of Mr. Bright's letter was that, whilst 
he distrusted the compromise Mr. Gladstone 
wns at this date prepared to make — to with- 
draw the Bill after the second reading, re- 
introducing it the following Session amended 
in the direction of the views of Ix)rd 
Hartington and Mr. Chamberlain — he would 
fall in with whatever conclusion the meeting 
arrived at, That is the sum- 
mary of the letter given by one 
who heard it read at the meet- 
ing. Mr. Labouchere, on the 
contrary, was under the im- 
pression that Mr. Bright had 
announced his intention to vote 
against the Bill Mr, Labou- 
chere reminding him that he 
had earlier stated he would 
Mr. Bright 
had been 
public by 




WHO 
KILLED 

COCK 
ROBIN ? 



THE KKJENULV UROKbK 



abstain from voting, 
answered that he 
grossly insulted in 
Mr Sexton, an incident in his 
long connection with Ireland 
which had decided him finally 
to break with the Nationalist 
party. 



Mr. Labouchere, who suspected that only 
a portion of the letter had been read to the 
meeting, asked Mr. Bright to give him a copy 
for publication. Mr. Bright consented to the 
publication, but said he had kept no copy- 
Mr. Caine arriving at this moment, Mr. 
Bright said, " Give Labouchere my letter to 
go to the papers." Mr. Caine 
had already destroyed it* 

This narrative of 

the inner history 

of the historical 

epoch, compiled 

from letters and 

oral communications made to 

me from leading members in 

the various camps, will enable 

the judicious reader to form 

his own opinion as to who 

killed the Home Rule Bill 

"Who defeated the Bill?" 
one of the fifty-five meeting in 
Committee-room No. 15, still a 
trusted member of the Unionist 
pa r t y , w r i t es. H e a n s we rs h i m - 
self with ascending notes of 
admiration, preserved from his text : " Hussey 
Vivian ! W. S, Caine ! ! Winter botham ! ! ! 
George Travel yan ! ! ! ! These, following in 
succession with bitter no n -surrender speeches, 
turned the feeling which Chamberlain's speech 
had left in a condition of icy impartiality-" 

"The man who was bitterest against any 
compromise," writes another leading member 
of the fifty-five, who has since found salva- 
tion, "and was most determined that the 
Bill should be thrown out, was not Bright, 
but George Trevelyan, who made a vehement 
speech, which undoubtedly settled the line 
the meeting took," 

A third correspondent, going 
back earlier to the date of the 
first negotiation conducted by 
Mr. Labouchere between Down- 
ing Street and Prince's Gardens, 
writes : *' It having leaked out 
that negotiations were going 
forward on the basis of retain- 
ing Irish members at Westmin- 
ster, and in other directions 
securing the supremacy of the 
British Parliament, Parnell went 
storming down to Downing 
Street, about two o'clock on 
the Saturday afternoon before 
the second reading speech, and 
knocked the whole arrangement 
into pie/* 




STORMING DOWN TO DOWN I KG ST KELT. 



by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITVOF MICHIGAN 



LyntoiL 



Written and Illustrated by J. Finnemore, 



HE popularity of this gem 
among seaside resorts for the 
wanderings of the honeymoon 
pair, a visit will at once ex- 
plain. Nature here is lavish in 
the grandeur and variety of 
her gifts the wild, rock-bound coast, fraught 
with a thousand perils to the mariner ; the 
sweeping moors, bare, bleak, solitary, sad ; 
the mountainous cliffs and headlands ; the 



mi 


i^s 



sweet and secluded valleys ; the wild roaring 
of the open sea ; and the gentle ripple of the 
fern -clad stream: such are some of the 
attractions which spread the fame of this 
veritable fairyland of the Lyn. 

Of the several routes by road and water 
which lead to Lyn mouth, the approach by 
water is truly a charming and impressive one. 
The traveller takes in, almost at a glance* 
the whole bay with its surrounding beauties 



^ 










' 



Vol xvi -11. 



byGotfgfe 



HG AT LYMTON. 



Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



82 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



- 










of cliff and sands, deep embowered caves, 
and wealth of vegetation, with the harbour 
and its shipping, the quaint watch-tower and 
village of Lyn mouth as the central attrac- 
tion. From these houses and flower-covered 
cottages, dotted here and there on the face of 
Lyn Cliff, carry the eye upwards to the larger 
village of Lyn ton, 400ft. above, 

There is neither pier nor landing-stage of 
any description ; none of the usual meAns of 
arrival are possible here. At high tide, as at 
low tide, the passage from steamer to shore 
is accomplished by the means of small 
boats,, manned by the native fishermen, who 
may be depended upon to bring us safely 
ashore, though not always by the most 
dignified method. For at very low tides 
some difficulty is experienced in getting the 
boats to shore — a long stretch of sea-weed 
covered boulders — progress can only be 
measured by inches, The boatmen, taking 



advantage of 
the breakers 
as they roll in, 
urge the craft 
slowly forward; 
^*--~ *" but with a full 
s> ** co m pi em ent of 

pa sse ngers, 
their utmost 
exertions will 
frequently fail 
to bring the 
burden nearer 
than some 
twenty feet of the beach- Then it 
is that our helplessness is so apparent, 
and we renew a far-away experience 
of childhood's days when the boat- 
men — in high boo t s, prepared for 
the emergency — take us in their 
arms, and, retaining the perpendicular 
with what grace the nature of the 
beach will allow, carry us ashore, 
placing us dryshod among the rocks. 
A scramble of ten or fifteen minutes, 
according to our agility, over these 
is necessary before we reach what we 
feel may be safely regarded as terra 
firma* 

By road, we have a choice of 

several different routes ; but the 

coach drive from Minehead stands 

out distinctly in . our experience as 

the first and best. It lies over a 

<?/ magnificent line of coast, and by this 

route, therefore, on this occasion, we 

wilt enter the charming seclusion of 

the twin - villages. The coach has 

accomplished the greater part of the long 

journey ; we have long left flower-embossed 

Porlock, have climbed the long hill on foot, 

and have resumed our seats behind the 

eager steeds ; have crossed a large part of 

Exmoor, and we are within easy reach of our 

destination. 

The approach from Countisbury Foreland 
is probably unique. The scene which is 
suddenly unfolded is likely, when visited for 
the first time, to prove somewhat appalling, 
and the face of the young bride who, with 
a newly -fledged Benedict, is nearly certain 
to be numbered among the travellers, will 
pale as the expanse below meets her half- 
fearful gaze, and were it not for other eyes, 
no doubt an arm would steal round the slim 
waist, and a voice promise protection even 
though the coach with its living burden should 
be hurled into the depths below. From this 
giddy height we Hoolt ^»:er down the jagged 

VER5ITY0F MICHIGAN 



LYNTON. 



83 




the castle; rock* 



face of the cliff and see the minute ripples of 
the sea shimmering at a depth or hundreds of 
feet below. On a distant hill in front of us 
we get a glimpse of the higher village of 
Lynton, with its many windows facing sea- 
wards. The old watch-tower of Lyn mouth, 
too, shows dark on the surf of the incoming 
tide t and steamers outward and homeward 
bound leave their long, dark wreaths of smoke 
on the evening sky, and their ever- widening 
trails prove their progress on the pathless 



deep. On the occasion of which we write 
the impress! veness of the scene was doubly 
enhanced by a brilliant rainbow with three 
attendant reflections, and together composed 
a picture never to be forgotten. 

As we dash down over the steep incline, 
for a medium pace is scarcely possible, the 
view is lost in the thick foliage of the trees 
between which we rush, and our journey is 
ended as the coach with its steaming horses 
pulls up on the bridge which spans the Lyn, 

"IVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



8 4 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



For once, even in steam-driven England, 
we get an ideal ending to an ideal journey, 
such as might soothe the spirit of Ruskin 
himself! We are landed in the very bosom 
of the most romantic scenery, free from the 
shrill confusion of the modern railway station. 
Flowers of every hue, creepers of every form 
of trailing loveliness, covering old fashioned 
cottages from doorway to chimney, delight 
the eye with their colour and careless beauty, 
A few yards to our right the West Lyn 
merges with the sister stream, and together, 
almost before mingling, they glide beyond 
the old Rhine Tower, and become one with 
the great sea. 



In marked contrast to the crowded 
greenery of the streams is the breadth and 
freedom of the cliff-side, which is traversed 
by a winding path cut in the very ribs of the 
rocky wall. It is called the North Walk, and 
leads directly to the Valley of Rocks, 

Approaching the valley from Lynton we 
enter it at its most eastern point, and absorb 
its beauties by degrees. Starling, however, 
from Lynmouth, we take the cliff-railway 
already referred to, and alight at the North 
Walk, This is by far the more interesting 
and picturesque route, and, introducing us 
into the valley somewhat unexpectedly, adds 
to the pleasure we derive from the charming 




A ROUGH MURNINC 



One of the most formidable tasks that 
presented itself to the visitor, formerly, was 
the journey from Lynmouth to Lynton. To 
accomplish this it was necessary to under- 
take a most fatiguing climb up the terrible 
hill that separates the villages. A vehicle 
could be hired, but if one were able-bodied, 
compassion would force one to alight, rather 
than weight the poor horse unnecessarily ; 
but a beneficent company has changed all 
that, and though at first lovers of these 
villages were somewhat shocked at the idea 
of a cliff-railway, the site was so well chosen, 
and the benefits derived from it so great, 
that the innovation is hailed with consider- 
able satisfaction. 

The coach still climbs the hill, and our 
drawing, u Up the Hill to Lynton/' gives some 
idea of the steep slope of this hill-side road. 

Digitized by tiOOQ IC 



view. It is, indeed, a delightful promenade s 
affording uninterrupted views along the coast 
and across the sea. Great masses of rock, 
bright with clinging vegetation, overhang the 
stony beach two hundred feet below. To 
our left, the precipitous cliff-wall continues 
its upward stretch ; jagged masses of rock 
threaten immediate descent, and here and 
there, adding a touch of life to the scene :— 

Up scour the s la riling stragglers of the flock, 
That on green plots o'er precipices browse ; 

at each turn of the path as it winds with the 
formation of the face of the cliffs, disclosing 
more and more extended views of the coast 
until in its final turn we get the first view r of 
the Castle Rock, a grandly picturesque mass 
of limestone. A gap hi the cliffs at this point 
provides as foreground a level stretch of grass, 
from which the south side of the rock rises ; the 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



LYNTON. 



»5 




north side, hoary and weather-worn, reaches to 
its full height of four hundred feet perpen- 
dicularly from the sea, The landward side, 
covered with bracken and bramble, has a 
rugged path which leads with little difficulty 
to the summit, and we remember that it was 
here, on this exalted platform, that, with a 
sheep and a goat as combatants, a vigorous 
battle raged, watched with sympathetic 
interest from the valley below by John 
Ridd, when, love-sick, he visited the Devil's 
Cheeswring to obtain the potent advice of 
Mother Melldrum. Roused by the unequal 
contest, he bounded up the rocky crag, only, 
as wt know, to see the inoffensive sheep 
succumb to the wild onslaught of his 
antagonist, who tossed it headlong into the 

O 



THE 1 \ I - V\, 



sea below. Remembering, too, how speedily 
the goat followed his vanquished foe, we 
venture near the edge and take a half-fearful 
glance into the hazy depths, and instinctively 
recoil to safer vantage ground. 

Looking westward we see a glorious stretch 
of rocky coast with Lee Abbey firm based 
and pinnacled on the nearer headland in the 
middle distance, each succeeding headland 
becoming less insistent in detail, broadening 
in effects of purple and of gold. 

But these beauties may not always be ex- 
plored under ®ej cfrcraifff etrti rays of the sua 

IVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



86 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



Dame Nature is not always propitious ; she 
varies the sunshine with the shower, and, as 
in the drawing, "A Rough Morning," pro- 
vides a scene of wild grandeur as interesting 
as the gentler mood. We walk through the 
beautiful Valley of Rocks to Lynton, and 
go down the cliff-railway once again to Lyn- 
mouth. Fishermen clad in oil-skin coats and 
sou' - westers keep 
watch at the sea- , . 

wall ; visitors in 
waterproofs seek 
sanctuary in any 
sheltered nook 
which permits 
view 



The streams grow in turbulence, in keep- 
ing with the spirit of the coast, and the 
angler's hopes rise, as he notes the swelling 
of the pools and the dimming of their pebbly 
bed. 

The steep hill -sides at whose foot the East 
Lyn rushes noisily along for many a mile 
through scenes of fairyland form what we 




coming sea ; the holiday aspect 
has given way ; Nature seems to 
have real business on hand, and 
serious its results are likely to 
prove to any craft caught unpre- 
pared on this cavernous coast. 
Fortunately, our backs are to the 
south-west, and the wild wind 
carries the spray back to the sea. So dense 
is the spray that the headland of Countis- 
bury is hidden from view, and the mist of it 
drives white against the grey sky. 



WATERS MEET. 



will style our " Honeymoon Valley," where 
we meet the various types of them that seek 
srrlusiuik 1-et us note their occupations. 
We see tJtacipwl fwdra, with sketch-book, 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



L YNTON. 



87 



are intent on securing in colour some 
lasting impression of the river's charms ; 
the bridegroom who, with rod and line, 
would tempt the wary trout he never 
catches, while his bride, ensconced between 
two lichened boulders, and cushioned 
with the stringy moss, is mingling with her 
present joy the sweet love story, now two 
centuries old, which has invested the locality 
with perennial interest. We have the happy 
pair who, strolling arm-locked, unconscious 



Tying: the photographer must needs go" far 
afield, and one's sympathies for the poor 
bride are continually enlisted, whether our 
excursions take us east, west, north, or south, 
far or near. The two flying figures are always 
in view, the modern Orpheus with camera in 
front, perspiring Eurydice behind ! 

But, happily, the landscape survives* and 
we will take that portion of Honeymoon 
Valley where the East Lyn has its course, 
and wander along the rugged path by its 







DEVOKSIIIRK CUE AM. 



of the glory that surrounds them, have, for 
the moment, eyes and thoughts for nothing 
but each other. The " demon " photographer, 
of course, is here, also in the character of a 
Benedict ; but now, as ever, he is a photo- 
grapher first, with tripod on shoulder and 
cloth of velvet flying at its head, rushing from 
point to point, as though the morrow would 
find all things changed. Meanwhile, the 
new-made wife, mindful of promises so 
recent, strives, as in duty bound, to keep 
pace with her enthusiastic spouse, doomed, 
even in these early days of married bliss, 
to carry a weighty box of plates. The 
charms that lie near at hand prove unsatU- 



side, which leads us now up the far-famed 
Watersmeet Valley. 

We pass through the rustic street of Bren- 
don, where through an open door we catch 
a glimpse of an old dame busy in the most 
interesting occupation of this district —the 
making of the far-famed Devonshire cream. 
Our drawing, "Making Cream," illustrates 
the old fashioned method of u raising the 
cream, n which is being rapidly superseded 
by the more moJern system of the store, not 
to mention the use of steam, the service of 
which valuable and universal agent is called 
upon for the more wholesale production of 
this popular aduaitm to our lighter meals* 

"IVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



S8 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE, 



Leaving Brendon, the course of the river 
is less secluded, and there are occasional 
stretches of bare hill-side, a foretaste of the 
higher reaches of the stream, At Malms- 
mead — we give a sketch of the old bridge and 



mystery of our surroundings, we almost feel 
that the "girt fan Ridd" is only a little in 
advance of us 3 and that the huge form may 
at any moment appear to our mortal eyes, 
and so present us with a lasting impression 
of his build and bearing. 

We complete our climb of the weird 
stream and gain the open, but there is no 
John Ridd« Two hundred winters have 
frozen the woods since he laid his offering of 
fresh -caught loach at the feet of the divine 
Lorna. Here it was that the heroine had her 
bower, and we are not a little surprised that 




farm-houses - — we enter 
the Doone Country, but 
a short walk from the 
valley which formed the 
stronghold of this family of 
free boo ters, w h ic h flourished 
two centuries ago, and now 
lives again in the vivid pages of 
Blackmore's ** Lorna Doone." 
The associations of this story 
pervade the whole district. 
The nature of the scenery 
has entirely changed ; the banks of the 
stream— here called Badgeworthy Water— are 
for the most part treeless, and the bare 
slopes of Exmoor, in purple and brown, 
stretch before us. Here the trout increase 
in numbers, and here is the famous water- 
slide where the wonderful loach were forked , 
and the climbing of which led to such 
momentous developments in the simple life 
of the owner of Plover's Barrows, inseparable 
from these moors and streams. So full of 
this romance are we that, in the gloom and 

Digitized by d< 



HAI.MSMEAIl. 



we have reached the try sting-place with so 
small an amount of trouble ; but times since 
then are changed, and we feel that the water- 
slide, somehow, must have changed with 
them. 

Returning by the river as far as Malms- 
mead, we prepare ourselves for a long, up-hill 
climb across the moors to Countisbury. We 
have left the solitary streams and woodlands 
for the open wilderness of bracken and 
heather, and a wild tangle of undergrowth, 
Weareimpr^g^jji^y|.sense of solitariness ; 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



LYNTON. 



89 



not a single cottage 
lends its influence 
to banish the lone- 
liness of the sweep- 
ing moors, As we 
climb and reach 
the higher lands a 
magnificent pano- 
rama stretches 
before us, hill 
beyond hill, in 
ever - varying light 
and shade; hills, 
brown with dying 
bracken, become 
lustrous gold in 
the evening light, 
strengthened in 
effect by the 
gloom of the hills 
behind ; they in 
turn discarding 
their purple robes 
for gold and crim- 
son, as the low 
clouds yield them 
sight of the wester- 
ing sun. Deep in 
the gloom of the 
villages of Oare, M 
Brendon, and things see 
than they are. If it were 
season, the blue mists with the red- 
dening foliage would almost persuade 
us that we had left behind, unnoticed, 
broad beds of violets or bluebells. 

The clanging of a cattle bell breaks the 
silence, and as though in response, the lon^- 
drawn note of a horn, sounding soft and 
musical, reaches us from the distance, 
announcing the home-returning coach. We 
decide to intercept it, and make direct 
through the dew-laden grass for the I'orlock 
Road, and are fortunate in finding vacant 
seats* The reds and greens have faded 
from the west ; the Holterday Hill tells back 
against the sky as we cross the Foreland, and 
the electric light twinkles brilliantly through 
the foliage and down the winding village 
street when, for the second time, we alight 
on the Lyn Bridge* 

Until May of this year Lynton was twenty 
miles from any railway station, but during 




%-\ 



that month a 
little line was 
opened to 
Barnstaple, It 
is only two feet 
gauge, and 
passes through, 
without in any 
way spoiling, 
some very beau- 
tiful scenery. 

The directors determined that neither 
Lynton nor Lynmouth should in any way 
suffer from the unsightly requirements of a 
station, and so have kept it outside the place, 
and it cannot be seen from either of the two 
villages. 



THE WATER-SLIDE. 



VoL XVU— 12. 



by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



An Experiment in Burglary. 

By H, Hobaut Nichols. 




PUT aside my morning 
paper as the breakfast 
bell rang, 

"Well, dear, what is 
the news?*' inquired my 
wife, when we were 
seated at table, 

" Nothing very start- 



rt Nonsense, George," replied my wife, who 
is not easily alarmed. " Do you suppose 
those men ever read of what is going on in 
society? At any rate, no one could enter 
this house in the night without arousing me ; 
and, if they did, they would never find the 
silver in that clever little device of yours — 
how could they ? " 



" 



TKiftKp Kir DC AH, we had bet teh put ofp 

IN A SAFE UEKOSIT.' 1 



ling," I replied, "except that the burglars 
were at it again last night; the police think 
they are an organized gang, and not local 
thieves." 

Washington had been the scene, for a fort- 
night past, of a series of daring robberies. 
The police were mysti- 
fied, and seemed to be 
unable to get the slight- 
est clue to their move- 
ments. 

11 1 think, my dear," 
I continued, * k that we 
had better put our silver 
in a safe deposit until 
these fellows let up, for 
it seems that they are 
too much for the 
authorities ; I should 
not like to lose it, and 
the fact that we have 
quite a tempting lot 
was well advertised 
in the society columns 
at the time of our 
marriage." 



-TCLUt 




L ' I'LL WAGE! YOU A NEW SILK HAL 



"* My dear, you don r t seem to understand 

how clever these professional burglars are ; 

and as for your hearing them, 

that's absurd. You have 

always laboured under the 

delusion that you are a light 

sleeper, I know ; but you are 

mistaken- Why, I'll wager I 

could break in and rifle 

the house myself from 

top to bottom without 

your knowing it" 

This last statement 
naturally piqued my 
better half. 

41 III wager you a new 
silk hat that you could 
not," 'she retorted, 
positively- 

* 4 1 accept the chal- 
lenge,"! replied. "What 
do you want if I lose?*' 



by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



AN EXPERIMENT IN BURGLARY. 



9i 



"Oh, as far as that goes, the satisfaction 
of being right will be quite enough for me, 
George." 

* 4 Nevertheless," I laughed, although at 
the time I had not the slightest intention 
of trying the experiment ; u nevertheless, I 
agree to add another piece of silver to your 
collection if I lose the wager." 

After breakfast I went to my office as 
usual, thinking no more of the conversation 
just related. Very likely it would not have 
occurred to me again, preoccupied as I was 
with work that would keep me until late that 
night, if my wife had not alluded to it as I 
was about to leave the house after dinner. 

E * I have been thinking over our conversa- 
tion at breakfast/ 5 she said, 4l and I am more 
positive than ever that we need not worry 
about our valuables, The slightest sound is 
heard aH over the house, and one of us would 
be sure to hear if anyone attempted to enter 
in the night. Good-bye, dear. Don't work 



custom of some doting young wives. So I 
had no misgivings on her account as I started 
to return home. 

It was later than I had supposed, for the 
cars had stopped, and 1 had to walk the half- 
mile or so to my house. It was a warm 
October night, and a fine mist had settled 
over the city, obscuring the faint light of the 
stars. The street lamps made great ghostly 
blurs as they melted in the distance, and the 
buildings grew more and more vague and 
shapeless, until they heeame part of the haze. 
The silence was profound, the streets almost 
deserted, and the houses I passed dark and 
gloomy as so many tombs. 

"What a perfect night for a burglar!" I 
reflected ; and with the thought came the 
recollection of my conversation with Alice at 
breakfast and her complacent boast. Why 
not jjut her to the test? 

4t By George ! " I exclaimed, half aloud, as 
the suggestion materialized into a plan, 




->~;1 



I KEFLECTH.D. 



too late ; it isn't good for one with your 
nervous temperament, you know," she added, 
teasingh\ 

I smiled at her pleasantry, and went my 
way. 

As I put down my pen that night, with 
the satisfaction one feels when conscious of 
having performed a duty well, I glanced at 
my watch, only to discover that it had 
stopped at three minutes past midnight, 
How much later it was 1 could only infer. 
It was no unusual thing, however, for me to 
remain <*ut late, and Alice, being as amiable 
as she was sensible, never made me feel un- 
comfortable by sitting up for me, as is the 



by Google 



"I'll do it; and if I succeed, won't I have 
the laugh on Alice in the morning ! M 

I had once, having mislaid my keys, 
managed to effect an entrance through 
one of the dining-room windows. I would 
do the same to-night, remove the silver 
from its hiding-place, conceal it elsewhere, 
let Alice herself discover its absence, and, 
after enjoying her discomfiture, tell her the 
whole story and claim the victory, 

To be sure, there was the possibility of 
failure* I might awaken Alice and frighten 
her out of her wits, for I had all a man's 
scepticism as to a woman's courage in the 
face of danger. Still, 1 would not admit 
that it was more than a shadow of a 

Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



9 i 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE, 



possibility. The more I thought of it, the 
surer I felt of myself. 

As I walked on I found myself entering 
into my rSfe with zest and enthusiasm. 
As detail after detail presented itself, an 
unholy delight in my own cleverness pos- 
sessed me ; and as I reached my house 
and tiptoed around the gravel walk to the 
side and rear, all my senses were keenly 
on the alert, and my heart beat with a 
lawless excitement not felt since the days 
when robbing corn-fields and water-melon 
patches formed the chief joys of my in- 
nocent boyhood, 



of the dining-room 



Trying the blinds 
windows, I at last 
found one that 
was not merely 
loose, but un- 
latched. 

"What careless- 
ness ! " I reflected ; 
" but so much the 
easier for me/ 1 

Opening it 
noiselessly, I was --', 
further surprised 
to discover that 
the window was 
raised* Plainly t I 
reflected, the ser- 
vants must not be 
trusted to lock up 
the house here- 
after. Glancing 
into the room, I 
saw that every- 
thing was as usual ; 
the drop-light 
burning dimly on 
the table, as wis 
always the case 
when I was out 
late, in view of the 

nocturnal luncheon with which 1 endeavoured 
to repair my wasted energies. After listening 
a moment, I pulled myself up, thrust one leg 
over the window-sill, and was half-way in 
the room, when I was confronted by a 
man — a burly fellow— who loomed suddenly 
out of the semi-darkness, and, levelling a 
revolver at me, brought me to a standstill 
To say that I was astonished is putting it 
mildly j and I have no idea what I should 
have said or done had not the ruffian inad- 
vertently given me my cue, which 1 am proud 
to say I was quick-witted enough to follow. 

4t Git hout o J this, yer bloat ! * he growled, 
in a deep, low voice, and with a decidedly 




( CilT HOUT O" THIS, VEK DLQAT ! ' HE GROWLED." 



Cockney accent "This his my game, hand 
I don't need hany o' yer hassistance. When 
I git through yer can ? ave what's left." 

I saw in a flash that the fellow mistook 
me for one of his own craft. My first 
impulse was to obey his injunction to 
"git hout" as speedily as possible, and 
return promptly with a policeman or two. 
Then I thought of Alice, Suppose the 
fellow went upstairs before I got back and 
she should see him. With all her boasted 
nerve, the shock w ? ould be terrible. No, I 
must not leave the rascal He was probably 
one of the gang who had been operating in 
Washington lately. If I were only cool 

enough and clever 
enough I might 
be instrumental in 
lodging him, and 
possibly his pals, 
in gaol, where I 
certainly wished 
him at the 
moment. To do 
this I must fall 
into the r$k of 
real burglar, to 
w T hich the fellow 
had assigned me, 
and in some w + ay 
bend circum- 
stances to my 
purpose. But 
though I had 
never in my life 
thought so rapidly 
or so much to the 
point as 1 did in 
the ten seconds I 
was looking into 
the barrel of that 
revolver, I confess 
I could not see 



by CiC 



IC 



my way clear ; 
however, something must be done, and 
quickly. So with a wink and a swagger, 
I motioned the revolver aside, and pulling 
myself into the room, remarked, in a cautious 
tone : — 

44 Come, now, my kid, don't be a fool, I've 
been watching my chance to crack this crib 
for some time, and now that I am here I 
don't mean that you shall stop me." 

The fellow glared at me for a moment, 
then lowered his weapon and hoarsely re- 
sponded : — 

M Well, don't Vouse the 'ouse. I suppose 
we'd better do the job together than git 
jugged" 

Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



AN EXPERlAfENT IN BURGLARY. 



93 



Evidently, no doubt of my belonging to 
his noble profession had yet occurred to him ; 
but I realized perfectly that the smallest 
mistake on my part might arouse his 
suspicion. I saw at a gin nee that he was of 
a low, brutal type, and that my only chance 
lay in convincing him that I was the superior 
cracksman of the two* 

" Never mind who I am/ } I replied to his 
inquiry as to my identity, " If you weren't 
a stranger in these parts I think you'd know 
me. Been taking a nap ? " I continued, 
noting that he had secured nothing so far. 
" Where's your swag ? " 

"I jest got hin, but I'm J anged if I sees 
hany think now's I'm J ere," he replied, sullenly. 



H YouVe right," I whispered, with a sly grin 
that cost me a tremendous effort (and I may 
as well add that my enjoyment of the rdk had 
ceased from the moment when the amateur 
became the professional), M they've got plenty 
of stuff, and we've only got to find it." 

He began pulling open drawers and closets, 
tossing the table linen into a heap on the 
floor and upsetting things generally. For 
some moments he worked on stealthily, 
I apparently assisting him, my mind revolv- 
ing plan after plan for bringing the situation 
to a desirable end, without, however, arriving 
at any decision. 

I felt perfectly easy as far as our silver was 
concerned ; no one not in the secret could 







**HB PEGAN PULLING OPEN PRAWKfci AMD CLOSETS." 



I glanced about, remarking that there 
didn't seem to be much in sight, and sug- 
gested that perhaps the house contained 
nothing worth taking, hoping that I might 
discourage him so that he would leave with- 
out further search, 

" None o* your Yankee tricks with me," 
he growled, and his tone was threatening; 
u yer knows there's a good 'awl to be made, 
or yer wouldn't be 'ere. Didn't I see in th' 
papers that these young J uns were jest mar r it 
an 1 they got a T eap a* silver give 'em ? * 

Even in my perturbed state of mind I felt 
a satisfaction in knowing that I was again 
right— burglars did read the society column, 
I made a mental note of the remark for 
the further humiliation of my wife. 



by Google 



possibly discover its hiding-place. But 
another anxiety was sending the blood to my 
brain. Supposing, finding nothing, the fellow 
should propose going up-stairs? Scarcely 
had the thought entered my mind when, with 
an oath, he turned from the open drawers and 
growled : — 

u They hain't nothink down 'ere j we'll 'ave 
to go hup." 

For a moment I was staggered ; then, 
14 1 guess you're right," I said " But you'd 
better let me go alone ; I'm lighter on my 
feet." 

In our upper hall there is a messenger 
call ; it was in the house when we moved in. 
Regarding it as a disfigurement to the wall, 
we had meant to have it removed ; but how 

Original from 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



94 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



glad I now was that we had procrastinated 
can be imagined. 

Breathlessly I awaited the villain's answer. 
He fixed his beady eyes on me j then, with 
a cunning leer : — 

" I'll go halom* too," he said ; "yer might 
need protection, yer see." 

He was troubled by no misgivings regard- 
ing my knavery, but evidently he did not 
believe in the adage that there is honour 
even among thieves ; he was fearful lest I 
cheat him out of what he considered his 
share ofthe plunder* It seemed clear that the 
only way to keep him down -stairs was to give 
up my cherished plate. Perhaps if I had 
had more time I might have thought of 
another plan ; but there stood the burglar, 
eyeing me suspiciously, and the crisis was at 
hand. I am a small man, more of a student 
than an athlete ; the burglar was a big fellow, 
with fists like sledge - hammers — and a 
revolver. So, inwardly cursing, but assuming 
a patronizing and reckless air, I said r— 

11 Well, I guess III have to let you into 
this, after all. You English chaps are a 
thousand years behind the times. You're 
not on to our Yankee notions, I see.'* 

I began moving along the wall, feeling the 
paneling, until I came to the comer near the 
door ; here \ stopped and looked at him ; he 
was watching me intently. I pressed one of 
the beads in the moulding, and instantly two 
of the panels slid apart, disclosing a tempting 
array of household silver. 

"Well, I be blowedl" ejaculated my 
colleague, aloud, forgetting caution ; and 
without delay he deftly began pulling out 
piece after piece. 

"You har a rum 'un, you har ! Was goin* 
to keep hit all to yer self, too. Say ! J owd 
yer git hon to it ? " he asked, with a touch of 
deference in his manner. 

" Oh, I'll divvy the silver, but 111 keep my 
knowledge to myself," 1 replied, jocosely, for 
I wanted to keep him in a good humour. 

So far so good ; but what I was to do next 
I had not the slightest idea. Ideas came and 
went confusedly as I watched him .stowing 
away our silver in a sack which he drew from 
beneath his waistcoat Again the man un- 
wittingly suggested my course, 

"Say, you tap the top o' the crib while 
I stow ha way this swag," 

At last, though he had the silver, it was 
evident that I had his confidence* Perceiv- 
ing my opportunity, I was quick to seize it* 

"All right ; but how do I know that you 
won't skip with the silver while Vm at it ?" I 
replied. 



sincerity j so, 
pushed aside 
the hail At 
paused - if I 



11 Do yer take me for a bloomin' h innocent 
in harms?" he grinned. * £ Dimons an' 
watches his worth 'avin'." 

I felt convinced of his 
slipping off my shoes, I 
the portiere and went into 
the foot of the stairs I 
aroused Alice she would suppose rightly that 
it was I t and would certainly speak ; the 
fellow would hear her and bolt with the 
silver. I dared not risk it Instead, I went 
through the library into a little room where 
my telephone is located. Closing both doors 
behind me, and putting my hand on the bell 
to muffle the sound, I rang up Central 

" What is it ?" came the answer. 

"Give me the Sixth Precinct quickly," I 
w T hispered. 

I waited an interminable time as it seemed 
to me, then the same voice said : — 

" Can't get them ; the wire's out of order." 

My heart sank within me ; but I stated 
the circumstances as briefly as possible to the 
operator, requesting that he send word to the 
police, I knew that there was nothing left 
for me to do but keep the fellow occupied 




KK APPEARED IN THE DOuKU AY WITH A PIECE OF WE 
IN IMS HAND/' 



by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



AN EXPERIMENT IN BURGLARY. 



95 



until the officers arrive d> but I had small 
hope of succeeding. Stealing back to 
the dining - room, I was bewildered to 
find that the burglar had vanished ; but 
there on the floor lay the bag of silver. 
Presently, however, I heard him in the 
pantry, and a moment later he appeared 
in the doorway with a piece of pie in 
his hand. 

'* Where do they keep the liquor ? " he 
grumbled j then, seeing my hands empty, he 
inquired : — 

" What luck hup-stairs ? M 

I shook my head. " Nothing there worth 
taking." 

His brows knitted in a way that expressed 
plainly that he doubted me. " I " 

" Hist ! ■ I interrupted. « What's that ? " 

There was certainly a noise outside. 

My surprise was genuine, for it did not 
seem possible that my summons could have 
been answered so quickly. 

The burglar sprang forward and turned 
out the light, at the same time making a 
grab for the silver, I was there before him, 
however^ and, bag in hand, made a rush for 
the hall and threw open the front door, only 
to find myself seized instantly by two officers 
of the law. 

II What's your hurry ? " coolly remarked one 





5 



1 i'm not the one/ t gasped. 



by Google 



*1T KEQUIHEP ONLY A KEW WORDS PROM HFR TO 
CONVINCE THE OFPlCKKS OK MY IDENTITY." 



of them, snapping a pair of hand 
cuffs on my wrists, 

L Pm not the one/' I gasped j 
"he's in the dining-room." 
Vou'll do/ 1 replied the man ; u hotter give 
over that bag; you won't need it." 

I am the proprietor of this house, and 
this is my own silver/ 7 I protested, in- 
dignantly. "For Heavens sake, go quick 
and capture that ruffian in the dining-room." 
u Come 3 we know you, and we don't want 
any of your old tricks ; you can tell us those 
fairy tales later/' said the first officer, going 
through my pockets with professional ease. 

In my agitation I did not hear Alice come 
downstairs, and only knew that she was 
present when I heard her excitedly corrobo- 
rating my statements. It required only a 
few words from her to convince the officers 

Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



96 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



of my identity, though 
evidently against their will ; 
for they continued to eye 
me with suspicion and 
removed the handcuffs 
with undisguised regret, 
as Alice subsequently 
asserted. When one of 
them finally concluded to 
investigate my statements 
regarding the real burglar, 
and made a rush for the 
dining - room, it hardly 
need be added that the 
bird had flown. 

The piece of pie on the 
table, minus a large semi- 
circular portion, and the 
disordered room, were the 
sole traces of his presence, 
if one excepts the bag 
containing his intended 
plunder. 

After partaking of the 
refreshments which I felt 
it proper to offer them 
the minions of the law 
departed, still chuckling 
over the events of the 
eveni ng and th eir 
denouement* 

"How perfectly dread- 
ful to find that revolver 
thrust in your face ! " said 
Alice, sympathetically, as 
soon as we were alone, "and 
you behaved all through, 
old George/' 



' SHk HAD b(£KN AROUSED bV NOISES 
JJOWN'STAIHS*" 



how splendidly 
you poor, dear 



" Yes," I acknowledged, 
modestly, "it was a trying 
situation for one of my 
1 nervous temperament/ " 

Alice gave me an affec- 
tionate tap on the cheek, 

"And if my policemen 
had not appeared with 
such amazing alacrity, you 
might have lost both your 
husband and your silver, 
my dear ■ for that fellow 
was getting very ugly." 

** Your police ! w replied 
my wife, smiling. 

"The police I tele- 
phoned for," I explained. 

Alice continued to smile, 

** But they were not 
your policemen, George; 
they were mine," 

It was now my wife's 
turn to assume a patromz- 
i 11 g tone — and she 
did it 

It seemed that she had 
been aroused by noises 
down -stairs, and being 
convinced that there was a 
burglary in progress, like 
the brave little woman she 
is, had gone to the mes- 
senger call and summoned 
the police; then, putting on 
her wrapper and slippers, 
quietly, if not calmly, awaited results. 

The next day Alice was the happy pos- 
sessor of a silver tea-urn. 





by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



Glimpses of Nature. 



XII. —A FOREIGN INVASION OF ENGLAND. 
By Grant Allen. 




UR worst enemies are not 
always the most apparent ones. 
It is easy enough to build 
forts for the protection of our 
towns and harbours against 
French or Germans, but it is 
very difficult to devise means of defence 
against such insidious foreign invaders as 
the influenza germ or the Colorado beetle. 
France lost much by the war with Germany ; 
but she probably lost more by the silent 
onslaught of the tiny phylloxera, which 
attacked her vineyards— attacked them, liter- 
ally, root and branch, and paralyzed for 
several years one of her richest industries. 
Yet invasions like these, being less obvious to 
the eye than the landing of a boat-load of 
French or German marines on some bare rock 
in the Pacific claimed by Britain, attract far less 
attention than aggressions on the Niger or 
advances in Central Africa. The smallness 
of the foe makes us overlook its real strength. 
It has the force of numbers. We forget 
that while we can exterminate hostile human 
bands with Armstrongs and torpedo-boats, 
the resources of civilization are still all but 
powerless against the potato blight, the vine 
disease, and the destroying microbe. 

The enemies of our corn crops in particular 
are many and various. There is the wheat- 
beetle, for example, which ravages the 
wheat-fields in two ways at once, the 
grub devouring the growing young leaves, 
while the perfect winged insect eats up at 
leisure the grain as it ripens. There are the 
various cockchafers, which vie with one 
another in their cruel depredations on the 
standing corn. There are the skip-jacks 
and wire-worms and other queerly-named 
beasties which attack the roots of the 
plant underground. There is the corn saw- 
fly, whose laiva feeds on the stalk of rye 
and wheat, till it finally cuts off the whole 
haulm altogether close to the soil at the 
bottom. There are the midges which lay 
their eggs in the swelling ear, where the 
maggots develop and prevent the proper 
growth of the impregnated grain. There is the 
gout-fly, which causes a gouty swelling at 
the joints, and the corn-moth, which de\ours 
the stored wheat in the granary. There are 

the red-maggot, and the grain-aphis, and the 
Yd. *vi— 13 

Digitized by L*OOQle 



thrips, and the daddy-longlegs, all of which 
in various ways prove themselves serious 
enemies of the agricultural interest. And 
there are dozens more, known only to men 
of science by dry Latin names, and duly 
chronicled by the farmer's friend, Miss 
Ormerod, in many learned and exhaustive 
monographs. 

But as if these were not enough for our 
" depressed " neighbours, the agriculturists, 
the last ten years or so have seen England 
invaded by a foreign foe, either from 
Germany or America — a foe whose life- 
history has been made a special subject of 
study by my collaborator, Mr. Enock, and 
whose strange story I shall detail (largely from 
his materials) with no unnecessary scientific 
verbiage in this present paper. 

The new invader is called the Hessian fly ; 
and he made his first appearance in Britain, 
or at least first attracted official entomological 
attention in this country, in 1886. If he was 
here earlier, he skulked incognito. For more 
than a century, however, he had already been 
a great scourge in America, where he first 
acquired the name of Hessian fly during the 
revolutionary war, through the popular belief 
that he had been imported from Europe into 
Pennsylvania by the Hessian troops employed 
as mercenaries by George III. in his fruitless 
struggle against the revolted colonies. The 
Hessians were the bites noires of the patriotic 
Americans ; and the Yankee farmers, finding 
their crops devastated by a pest till then 
unknown, came at once to the conclusion 
that their enemy, King George, had sent the 
two plagues, human and entomological, over 
sea together. They regarded the question 
much in the same spirit as that of the loyal 
poet in the " Rejected Addresses," when he 
asks about Napoleon, "Who fills the butchers' 
shops with large blue flies?" The Briton 
set down every natural misfortune to "the 
Corsican ogre"; the American set down 
all evils that befell him to the Rhenish 
mercenaries. 

Ever since that day, much controversy has 
raged in America and Germany as to the 
original home of the destructive creature. 
One school of disputants hotly maintains 
that the Hessian fly, vYich now abounds in 
parts Qf France, Austria, and Russia, is a 

. UNIVERSITY OF 



98 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 




native of the Old World, and that its first 
home coincided with that of our primitive 
cereals, Southern Europe and Western Asia, 
Another school, anxious to make out the 
enemy an American citizen, fighu hard for its 
being an aboriginal inhabitant o( the United 
States. Thus much, at least, is certain, that at 
the present day the "fly" is found in both 
hemispheres in too great abundance, and that 
in America in particular in certain disastrous 
years it has almost ruined the entire wheat 
crop* I have seen whole fields upon fields 
there simply 
pillaged by its 
ravages, The 
loss produced 
by this insig- 
nificant little 
creature, in- 
deed, has in 
some seasons 
been measured 
by millions of 
pounds ster- 
ling. 

If you go 
out into a 

barley-field in England where the Hessian 
fly has effected his entrance, you will pro- 
bably find a large number of plants of barley, 
like that delineated in No, i, with the stem 
bent down sharply towards the ground at 
the second joint At first sight you might 
imagine these stalks were merely broken 
by the wind or fallen by their own weight; 
but if you examine them closely in the 
neighbourhood of the bend t which occurs 
with singular unanimity in all the affected 
plan is at about the same point, you will find 
inside the sheath of tin: 
blade, where it encircles 
the stem, a curious little 
body which the farmers 
with rough eloquence 
have agreed to describe 
as a "flax-seed." If 
you watch the develop- 
ment of the u flax-seed/' 
again, you will find that 
it is not a seed at all, 
hut the pupa-case {or 
rather the grub-shell) of 
a small winged insect; 
and it is the life-history 
of this insect, the 
Hessian fly, that I now 
propose to sketch for 
you in brief outline. 

No, 2 shows the 



AN INVALIU BAR LEV PLANT, 




by LjOOgle 



mother fly herself, very much enlarged, for 
in nature she is but a small black gnat, 
belonging to the same group as our old friend 
(and foe) the mosquito. You will observe 
that she is a fairy-like creature, for all her 
wickedness : she has two delicately fringed 
wings (with " poisers " behind them), a pair of 
long antennse with beaded joints, six spindle 
legs, and a very full and swollen body, She 
needs that swollen body, for she is a mighty 
egg-layer. She flies about on the stubbles in 
September, and lays her eggs on the self- 
sown barley 
plants and on 
the aftergrowth 
of the cut 
crops ; as well 
as in spring (a 
second brood) 
on the new 
sprouting 
barley. One 
industri ous 
female which 
Mr. Knock 
watched when 
so employed 
laid no fewer than 158 eggs on six distinct 
plants ; while another laid eighty on a 
single leaf. He has noted in detail many 
cases in the same way, and all show an 
astonishingly high level of maternity. The 
eggs are extremely minute, and are pale 
orange in colour, with reddish dots. 
Most of them are deposited on the leaf itself, 
or on the sheath or tube which forms its 
lower portion. 

And now see how clever this dainty little 
creature is ! She lays her eggs with the head 
end downward ; and as 
soon as the tiny grub 
hatches, which it does 
about the fourth day, it 
emerges from the shell, 
and walks straight down 
towards the stem, at 
the point where the 
protecting leaf - sheath 
is wrapped closely 
round it. The worm 
forces itself in between 
the stem and the 
sheath, and after walk- 
ing steadily for four 
hours, at the end of 
which time it has 
covered a record space 
of nearly three inches, 
it arrives at the joint, 



HK SOURCE Or THE M I5CH1EJ : THE H^SIAW FLV, 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



GLIMPSES OF NATURE. 



99 




-THE GRUB AT WOWK* 



where the sheath begins, and so finds its way 
blocked by the partition wall ; it can get no 
farther. Here then the young grub stops, 
as you see in No. 3, wedged tightly in between 
the leaf-sheath and the stem, and with its 
head pointing downward. Being a hungry, 
nnd therefore an industrious, creature, it at 
once sets to work to eat the barley- plant. 
This it does by fixing its sucker-like mouth 
on the soft, sweet, and juicy portion of the stem 
just above the joint —that same soft, sweet> 
and juicy portion which children 
love to pull out and suck, and 
from which the grub, too, sucks 
the life-juice of the barley-plant. 
Naturally, however, you can't suck 
a plant's life-blood without injuring 
its growth ; so, after a very short 
time, the enfeebled stem begins 
to bend, as you see in No. 3, a 
tittle distance above the point 
where the grub is devouring it. 
It has been undermined, and its 
vitality sapped, so it gives way at 
once near the source of the injury. 
How much damage this action 
does "to the crop you can best 
understand by a glance at the two 
next contrasted illustrations* No. 
4 represents "seven well-favoured 
ears" of barley, unaffected by 
Hessian fly, and with the grains 
richly filled out as the farmer 
desires them. No, 5, on the 
contrary, shows you " seven lean 
cars," attacked by the fly, and 



bent and ruined in various degrees by 
the indirect action of the silently-gnawing 
larva- Look un this picture and on that, 
and you will then appreciate the British 
farmers horror of his insignificant opponent. 
You will observe, by the way, that I 
speak throughout of barley, not of wheat. 
This is because in England, where these 
sketches are studied, the time of wheat- 
sowing is such that the wheat has so 
far escaped the pest ; the female flies are all 
dead before the crop has sprouted : whereas 
in America the "fall wheat" comes up at the 
exact moment when the female Hessian fly 
is abroad and scouring the fields in search of 
plants on which to lay the eggs of her future 
generations. In England, therefore, it is barley 
alone which is largely attacked; and since 
barley is mainly used for malting, to 
make beer or whisky, the teetotaler may 
perhaps reflect with complacency that 
the fly is merely playing the game of the 
United Kingdom Temperance Alliance. His 
joy, however, is fallacious, for, on the other 
hand, if we don't raise enough barley at home 
to brew our ale, we don't on that account 
refrain from malt liquors : we buy it from 
elsewhere ; so that, in the eyes of the im- 
partial political economist at least, the Hessian 
fly in Britain must be regarded as an unmiti- 
gated national misfortune. 

The grub eats and eats, in his safe cradle 
between the sheath and the stem, till he is 
ready to pass into the adult condition. But 




by L^OOgle 



4.— SEVEN WELL-PAVOUEBD EARS. UNATTACKHft 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



ir,S 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 




From a] 



AITl-YtNC. TflF- t'f-ASTKTi* 



All being ready, a few cheering words are 
spoken to the unhappy victim and the 
plaster is mixed. This is carefully poured 
or sprinkled over the features (No, 2), 
The following operations have then to be 
performed with skill and celerity : Directly 
the plaster lightly covers the face, a small but 



in thickness. Ere this 
has quite set, the before- 
mentioned threads are 
pulled up through the 
mould, so as to cut the 
plaster, otherwise it would 
be impossible to remove 
it from the face. 

The subject whose 
mask is being taken is 
now having a lively time. 
The plaster presses and 
burns his cheeks. He 
thinks of all the horrible 
things that might happen 
should those two little 
quills get choked Not 
a sound of the outer 
world can he hear, save 
some indistinct rumbling, 
and the thud, thud, of his 
beating heart almost 
Hours seem to pass, and 
he is powerless to know what is going 
on. He lays helplessly there, and, perhaps 
out of curiosity, tries to raise an eyelid. 
That settles him* as by this time the 
plaster has hardened, and holds the lid 
in an immovable grip, A sickly sensa- 



ifkuto- 



deafens him* 




From a] 



3.— THE STCfJAL— 1 ' ALL'S WELL,*' 



t/'hrfu. 



strong thread is laid on either cheek, running 
from the top of the heid down to the neck, 
and is pressed into the plaster until it almost 
touches the skin. Additional plaster is n9w 
placed on T until the whole is about an inch 



tion comes over him — he feels paralyzed, 
and unconsciously gives a long groan. This, 
by the way, can only come through the quills 
in his nostrils, and it naturally alarms the 
operator, who immedjateiy. shouts as loudly 



GLIMPSES OF NATURE. 



101 



complicate the subject by introducing a 
multiplicity of technical terms unknown 
to my readers.) In No. 6 you can see 
the adult grub in the very act of thus 
turning round, head to tail, within his outer 
skin, so that he may be able to emerge as 
a full-grown fly, head upward A tiger is 
nothing to it, though a tiger moves within 
his own integuments more freely than most of 
us. You will note that during the feeding 
stage, the grub's mouth and under side were 
pressed against the stem ; when he has per- 
formed this curious somersault on his own 
axis, so to speak, the head 
is uppermost, but the mouth 
and under side of the body 
are turned outward towards 
the sheath, not inward 
towards the stem and 
hollow centre of the barley- 
plant. He wants now to 
bite his way out, not to 
suck at the stalk for its 
nutritive juices* 

I need hardly add that it 
takes some watching to 
detect such invisible move- 
ments inside a hard dark 
case ; and only by the 
closest and most unweary- 
ing attention was Mr, Knock 
enabled to discover the true 
use and meaning of the so- 
called anchor-process. It 
is really not an anchor, but 
a sort of hooked foot or 
lever, by whose aid the 
apparently dormant grub 
turns himself bodily over 
within his own hardened 
skin, now become too large 
for his shrunken body- 
Discoveries like these are 
hard to make; yet they bring little return in 
money or glory. But it is only by such 
patient and careful investigation that a way 
can be discovered to get rid of pests which 
cost civilization many hundreds of thousands, 
nay, many millions, annually. 

The grub in the turning stage is thus by 
no means what he looks — a dormant 
creature ; on the contrary, he is a gymnast 
of no small skill and activity. The muscular 
contortions by which he seeks to free himself 
of discomfort when disturbed by man show 
that he possesses great power of contraction, 
and that he can exercise a considerable force 
of leverage. 

After the grub has succeeded in putting 




7. — THE CLIMBING PUPA \ HETJ7W, 
THE E-SJITV CASE. 



itself in position for assuming the winged 
stage, and emerging from its home head 
upward, it begins next tc grow into a true 
pupa, or chrysalis, It is in the pupa, of course, 
that all winged insects acquire their wings and 
become definitely male or female* and this stage 
is, therefore, one of the most important. As 
soon as the grub begins to reach it, he swells 
once more and grows quite tight inside his 
larval skin, which is stretched so much that 
it seems to be bursting. At last, as he 
wriggles and twists within it, the skin does 
burst, first over the mouth and head, and 
then over the central joints 
of the body. Again the 
insect twists and wriggles 
inside this half-broken skin, 
and again he pushes it back- 
ward towards his tail, till at 
last he has sloughed it all 
off entirely, and it remains, 
a shrivelled relic — an empty 
case- — in the spot where 
he has hitherto lived and 
breathed and had his being. 
He is now a true pupa, 
white at first, but gradually 
growing a delicate pink, 
and then rosy. 

Just at first, however, 
the pupa looks almost as 
formless as the grub it 
replaces, revealing no limbs 
or distinct segments. But 
little by little, feet and legs 
and eyes and wings begin 
to be visible through the 
semi-transparent shell of 
the chrysalis. He is chang- 
ing slowly into a winged 
insect, and you can watch 
the change through the 
delicate horny coverings. 
Stranger still, the Hessian fly at this stage 
is not torpid and quiescent like most ordinary 
insects. The pupa, as in many of this 
family, is locomotive. It has legs and feet, 
and it can wriggle its way up, as you see in 
No. 7, where the lower object is the empty 
larval skin, now deserted by its inmate, while 
the upper one is the pupa, emerging from the 
sheath, and making its first experiences of the 
wide, wide world outside its native leaf- 
bound hollow. It is ready now to come forth 
from the pupa stage, and to fly abroad in 
the open air in search of a mate with whom 
to carry on the serious business of replenishing 
the fields with new generations of similar 
larva?. 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



102 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



The succeeding illustrations show you in 
detail the various stages in the process of 
emergence. No* 8 gives you the beginning 
of emancipation. The pupa has here bitten 
its way through the leaf-sheath with its hard, 
horny jaws, and is protruding visibly. Just 
at first, only the head itself gets free ; then 
the insect rests a while after its arduous 
labour, and begins wriggling and writhing 
again, this time working out its body or 
thorax* After another short interval for 
recuperation after such a terrific effort, it 
manages to pull its legs through the hole, and 
to support itself upon them by resting them 
like a bracket against the stem of the barley. 
This is the point just reached in the 
illustration No. 8, There the pupa stops 






B.— THE PUPA COMB$ trUI*- 

short, having got himself into a con- 
venient position for dispensing with his 
coverlet ; for the sheath of the barley grasps 
the pupa-skin tight as in a vice, and he can 
wriggle his winged body free within it T with- 
out paying any further attention to the dis- 
used mummy-case which once confined it 

In No, 9, the pupa being thus safely 
anchored, the fly is emerging. It is a slow 
and delicate process, for with so many legs and 
wing> and antennae and appendages to get 
free from the mummy-case, one cannot hurry : 
haste might be fatal. At this first stage of 
emergence, as you will observe, all the im- 
portant parts are still cramped at their ends 
within the pupa-shell ; but you can see how 
the legs and antennae are striving to dis- 
engage themselves. The pupa-covering is 

Digitized by GoOglC 




Q,— AND TKL FLY COMES OUT OF IT + 

propped as before by the empty leg-shells 
so as to form a bracket. 

In No. lo— hurrah ! with a supreme effort, 
our fly has got her antennae free ! She can 
move them to and fro now, in all their jointed 
and tufted glory. That enables her to wag 
her head in either direction without difficulty, 
and encourages her to go on to fresh exertions 
for the rest of the deliverance. But her feet 
are still fast in that hampering mummy-case ; 
she must try her hardest now to free them 
each carefully, 

First, however, let her get the tips of her 
wings free to help them. One good jerk and 




UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



GLJAfPSES OF NATURE. 



103 




II- — WINLrS FREE I 

out conies the "first 
wing* Now she 
bends backward and 
forward and seems 
straining every nerve. 
Halloa, that did it ; 
the other wing is 
free ! Not as yet, 
however, plimmed 
out and flattened as 
it will be a little 
later; both wings at 
present look some- 
what thick and lumpy 
and stick-like. Such 
as they are you see 
them in No. n, 
rather clumsy speci- 
mens, w T hile our lady 
goes on with re- 
doubled energy, now concentrating her 
efforts on her front pair of legs— for when 
you have six to think of, one pair at a time is 
about as much as you can easily manage. 

In No. 1 1, the first pair, you will note, are 
all but free. She wriggles out one of them, 
and then its fellow. Oh, how she tugs and 
pulls at them I Meanwhile, the tufts of hairs 
on the antennae, which at first were bunchy 
and little developed, have begun to expand ; 
she looks, by this time, distinctly more like a 
respectable insect- Well done, once more; 
two pairs of legs now free. No, 1 2 shows them. 
But, take care ; we are getting now rather far 
out of the mummy case. Be sure you don't 
overbalance, and tumble bodily out, tearing 
your hind pair of legs off, with the force of 

your fall. Those thin shanks are brittle, and 

r 




you find litde support now from the empty 
skin and the hollow bracket. 

Nature, however, is wiser than her critics. 
Just when it looks as if next moment the fly 
must lose her balance and topple over, she 
twists suddenly round, with a dexterous lunge, 
catches the bent stem with two of her free 
legs, and anchors herself securely, No, 13 
shows how this is done. Below is the now 
almost empty pupa-shell, still inclosing the 
last two legs, on freeing which our astute 
little enemy is busily occupied. But with 
the two legs on her upper side (as she 
stands in the illustration) she has caught at 
the barley-stem, one foot being firmly planted 
below the bend, and one above it. This 
gives her a fine purchase to depend upon in 
her last wild blow for freedom, A long pull, 

and a strong pull, 
and she has got — 
what the modern 
woman so ardently 
craves— complete 
emancipation I The 
third pair of legs are 
out at last ; she has 
all the woild before 
her to wander over 
and lay eggs in. 

In No. 14 you see 
her, then, free, but 
resting. She has 
now shaken herself 
out, and left her 
empty m u m m y-case 
imprisoned at her 
side in the sheath 
which holds it Its 



-NOW FOB THB LEGS ! 



FT i i 















































*3" 



; !*Htt USE OF LF-YERAGifc 



IYERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



io4 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



fate no longer interests her. Then she crawls 
a little way along the surface of the barley- 
stem, and presently, clasping it with her four 
front legs, she hangs herself up, tail down- 
ward, to dry in the sunshine. No. 14 graphi- 
cally represents this curious position. Almost 
all flying insects, when they emerge from the 
chrysalis stage, do something analogous. 
Their wings are still club-like, their antennas 
undeveloped or not fully expanded, their 
jointed legs weak and groggy* But after a time, 
as they breathe or inflate themselves with air, 
all these parts grow fuller, lighter, and harden 
The Hessian fly in this predicament waves 
her wings to and fro several times across her 
back ; and in about 
a quarter of an hour 
they have plimmed 
out fully, so that she 
can soar away on 
her marriage - flight 
to meet her prospec- 
tive aerial husband. 
As for the tiny 
silvery shroud or 
deserted pupa-case, 
it is left protruding 
frofti the stem of the 
barley. 

This that I have 
given you is the 
history of a success- 
ful and fortunate 
fly ; but not every 
individual of the 
species is quite so 
lucky- As in the 
case of the mos- 
quito, nature at 
tjmes makes not a 
times the flies have 




14,— HANGING HERSELF UP TO DRV. 



few failures. Some- 
insuperable difficulty 
in freeing themselves from their articulated 
coverings ; sometimes they break or spoil 
their legs or wings, and become helpless 
cripples. Yet so strong is the impulse of 
every species to (ill the world with its like 
that sometimes, says Mr. Knock, even these 
poor maimed insects will manage to crawl to 
a proper food-plant, and will lay their eggs 
on it bravely like their more fortunate sisters* 
He noted one crippled female which in spite 
of its feebleruess was eighty times over a 
happy mother. This is usually the case with 
such small insect pests ; their life consists^ 
indeed, of two things only : eating their way to 
the winged stage, and then laying as many 
eggs as possible, to do like damage in the 



the adult winged stage seems to be about 
five days for the females, and probably a 
good deal less for the males. The bachelors 
in search of a wife fly sometimes for long 
distances across country ; but their prospec- 
tive partners are almost always shyer and 
more maidenly ; they hide under the leaves 
and travel but short- distances, considering it 
more ladylike to stop at home and wait for 
suitors than to go out and seek them. They 
are not new women. Indeed^ so great is their 
modesty that they often hide in holes in the 
ground to escape observation ; and they 
usually alight on the earth, as their colour is 
blackish, and they are there less exposed to 

the attacks of birds 
and other enemies 
than on the green 
foliage. It is a 
noticeable fact in 
nature that many 
species of animals 
seem thus to know 
instinctively the 
colours with which 
their own hues will 
best harmonize, and 
to poise by prefer- 
ence on such 
colours ; many dap- 
pled or speckled 
insects, for example, 
resting with folded 
wings on the dappled 
and speckled flower- 
bunches of the 
carrot tribe, while 
green insects aflect 
rather green leaves, 
and brown or black insects come to anchor 
on the soil, which best protects them. This 
is not quite the same thing as what is 
called protective colouring, such as occurs 
in desert animals, most of w T hich are spotted 
like the sand, or in the fishes and crabs 
which frequent the sargasso-weed in the 
Sargasso Sea, all of which are of the same 
pale lemon-yellow tint as the seaweed they 
lurk among ; fortius case of the Hessian fly 
includes a deliberate choice of ingrained 
habtt. The insect has many objects of many 
different colours spread about in its neigh- 
bourhood, but it habitually selects as its 
resting place those particular objects which 
most closely approach its own peculiar 
ground-tint. 

It is a curious fact, however, that in spite 
of all the apparent pains bestowed upon 



next generation* 

The average life-time of the Hessian fly in securing the perpetuation of such destructive 



b ^ Ti UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



GLIMPSES OF NATURE. 



105 



creatures as the Hessian fly, the pest itself 
has its own enemies, as fatal to its life as it 
is to the barley* Ichneumon flics and other 
parasites prey by millions on the Hessian 
fly in its grub condition ; and many good 
authorities believe that the safest way of 
checking the depredations of the barley- 
plague is by encouraging the multiplication 
of its natural enemies. No. rs shows us 
one of these industrious little scourges 
actually at work. She alights on a stem of 
barley infested by grubs of the Hessian fly, 
and walks slowly along it 3 tapping gently as 
she goes j much as a wood- 
pecker taps with his bill 
on a tree-trunk to discover 
the spot where a worm 
lies buried* After carefully 
examining the surface, she 
finds at last a place where 
something, either in the 
sound or the feeling of 
the stem, reveals to her the 
presence of a Hessian fly 
grub within the leaf-sheath, 
Having accurately diag- 
nosed the spot (like a 
doctor with a stethoscope), 
she brings her ovipositor 
(in plain English, her egg- 
layer) just above the place 
where the grub is lying 
snug in its green bed, and 
pierces the hard leaf-blade 
with her sharp little lancet 
Then she lays her egg in 
the body of the larva. 
This egg gives rise in time 
to a parasitic grub, inside 
the first one ; and the para- 
site eats out his host's body, and emerges in 
due time as a full -grown fly, ready to carry 
on the same cycle in future- More than 
nine-tenths of the Hessian fly grubs hatched 
out in America are thus destroyed by 
parasites before they reach maturity ; and it 
seems likely that the surest way of fighting 
insect plagues like the Hessian fly is by 
encouraging the increase of such natural 
destroyers. 

At first sight, to be sure, it may seem im- 
probable that man could do anything to 
11 encourage " the reproduction of such very 




T5-— WILY ENBlrfV 
THE 



small creatures ; but that is not really so, All 
that is necessary .is to keep the straw in which 
the parasitic grubs abound, and so allow the 
two hostile kinds to fight it out among them- 
selves for the farmer's benefit. Mr. Enock 
mentions an instructive case of this sort from 
America, where the Californian orange- 
growers were almost being ruined by the 
depredations of the scale-insect, a queer little 
beast which you may often find on the rind 
of certain imported oranges. But an enemy 
to the scale- in sect was discovered in Australia 
— an enemy to the scale-insect, and s there- 
fore, an ally of the harassed 
orange-grower. It was a 
particular kind of lady- 
bird, which devours in its 
larval stage whole tribes 
of the scale-insects* That 
wonderful entomologist, 
Professor Riley, whose ser- 
vices were worth many 
millions of pounds to the 
American farmers, got 
wind betimes of this new 
destroyer, and imported 
a few specimens, actually 
sending a skilled agent to 
Australia to collect them. 
The precious little crea- 
tures were housed at once 
in a muslin tent, covering a 
scale-infested orange tree; 
and there, rising to a sense 
of the duty imposed upon 
them, they laid their eggs on 
the leaves with commend- 
able promptitude. The 
larvae soon hatched out, 
and began feeding upon the 
scale-insects; and in an incredibly short time 
there were beetles enough on that single tree 
to distribute by boxfuls among the distressed 
agriculturists. The result was that before very 
long the scale-insect became a rare specimen 
in California, But that was in the United 
States ; we English are too " practical " to 
take any notice of those theoretical men of 
science. We put our hands in our pockets 
and let our crops get destroyed in the good old 
u practical " way ; then we shake our heads 
and observe with a smile that u there are great 
difficulties n in the way of doing anything. 



LAVING HER EGCS IN 
LARVA* 



VoL *vl-14, 



by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



:o4 



11 IE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



waited only for customers in shoals to pour 
in upon us. /called them "customers"; Elsie 
maintained that we ought rather to say 
"clients." Being by temperament averse to 
sectarianism, I 
did not dispute 
the point with 
her. 

We reposed 
on our laurels 
— in vain. 
Neither cus- 
tomers nor 
clients seemed 
in any particular 
hurry to disturb 
our leisure, 

I confess I 
took this ill It 
was a rude 
awakening. I 
had begun to 
regard myself 
as the special 
favourite of a 
fairy god- 
mother ; it sur- 
prised me to 
find that any 
undertaking of 
mine did not 
succeed im- 
mediately. However, reflecting that my fairy 
godmother's name was realty Enterprise, I 
recalled Mr. Cyrus \\\ Hitchcock's advice, 
and advertised. 

" There's one good thing about Florence, 
Elsie, ,J I said, just to keep up her courage. 
t( When the customers d& come, they'll be 
interesting people, and it will be interesting 
work. Artistic work, don't you know — Fra 
Angelico, and Delia Robhia, and all that sort 
of thing : or else fresh light on Dante and 
Petrarch ! " 

"When they do come, no doubt, 1 ' Elsie 
answered, dubiously. ^But do you know, 
Brownie, it strikes me there isn't quite that 
literary stir and ferment one might expect in 
Florence. Dante and Petrarch appear to he 
dead, The distinguished authors fail to 
stream in upon us as one imagined with 
manuscripts to copy." 

I affected an ait of confidence — for I had 
sunk capital in the concern (that's business- 
like — sunk capital ! ). " Oh, were a new firm," 
I assented, carelessly. " Our enterprise is yet 
young, When cultivated Florence learns 
w r c're here, cultivated Florence will invade us 
in its thousands." 




FAINTING Til 



by Google 



But we sat in our office and hit our thumbs 
all day : the thousands stopped at home. 
We had ample opportunities for making 
studies of the decorative detail on the 

Campanile, till 
we knew every 
square inch of 
it better than 
Mr. Ruskin, 
Elsie's note- 
book contains, I 
believe, eleven 
hundred separ- 
ate sketches of 
the Campanile, 
from the right 
end, the left 
end, and' the 
middle of our 
window, w f kh 
eight hundred 
and five distinct 
distortions of 
the individual 
statues that 
adorn its niches 
on the side 
turned towards 
us. 

At last, after 
we had sat, 
and bitten our 
thumbs, and sketched the Four Greater 
Prophets for a fortnight on end, an immense 
excitement occurred. An old gentleman was 
distinctly seen to approach and to look up at 
the sign -board which decorated our office, 

I instantly slipped in a sheet of foolscap, 
and began to type-write with alarming speed 
— click, click, click ; while Elsie, rising to 
the occasion, set to work to transcribe 
imaginary shorthand as if her life depended 
upon it, 

The old gentleman, after a moment's 
hesitation, lifted the latch of the door 
somewhat nervously, I affected to take no 
notice of him, so breathless was the haste 
with which our immense business connec- 
tion compelled me to finger the keyboard ; 
hut, looking up at him under my eyelashes, 
I could just make out he was a peculiarly 
bland and urbane old person, dressed with 
the greatest care, and some attention to 
fashion. His face was smooth \ it tended 
towards portliness. 

He made up his mind, and entered the 
office. I continued to click till I had 
reached the close of a sentence — "Or to 
take arms against a sea of troubles, and by 

Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



WINDMILLS— OLD AND NEW, 



107 



wind, however frequently and abruptly the 
tetter may change, The same inventor devised 
a simple and effective method of reefing the 
sails, so as to preserve them from damage, 
and to keep the speed of the mill compara- 
tively uniform, during great irregularities in 
the force of the wind, Each of the four sails 
b made of a series of shutters, carried trans- 
versely on the arm, or " whip," which is from 
30ft. to 50ft. long. These shutters are hinged 
like the slats in a Venetian blind ; the force 
of the wind tends to open them and so to 
diminish the surface of the sail, while a system 
of weights and levers, 
working from the interior 
of the mill through the 
hollow shaft of the sails, 
tends to close the 
shutters. 

The massive, old- 
fashioned windmills were 
made largely of wood and 
brick ; it was the advent 
of the iron age that made 
possible the lighter, more 
powerful, and less ex- 
pensive modern ma- 
chines. The latter, which 
originated in America, 
are made in many sizes 
and follow a variety of 
types. They are rapidly 
spreading over the world, 
and are being applied to 
all kinds of work. Few 
people in this country 
have any conception of 
the magnitude of the 
windmill industry* Over 
100,000 are turned out 
every year in the United 
States alone. They are 
used to pump water for 
the supply of railways, 
villages, farms, and 
private houses, to irrigate 
dry land, and to drain marshes. They drive 
millSj saws, and agricultural machinery, and 
are being used with increasing success for 
generating electricity for purposes of lighting 
and supplying power to motors. But these 
cheap and useful machines are not yet so 
irell known in this country as to make a 
description needless, 

A light and sometimes very high skeleton 
tower, of wood or steel, carries the wheel 
which does duty as a sail This is a disc, 
from ten to sixty or more feet in diameter; 
it consists of many blades which radiate from 

Digitized by Google 




TWELVE- FOOT STEKL MILL ON SINE TV- FOOT 
TOWEB* 



the centre, and are set as closely to one 
another as possible, due space being allowed 
for the wind to pass through after it has done 
its work. It is as if the four sails of the 
old type of mill had been multiplied until 
they completely filled a circle. It is plain 
that this wheel presents a much larger 
surface to the wind than was the case in 
the old mill In the larger wheels there 
are two, three, or more concentric circles 
of blades, otherwise each slat would be of 
inconvenient length. 

The wheel is never quite vertical ; its face 
is always turned slightly 
upwards. The reason for 
this is that the wind does 
not blow parallel with 
the surface of the earth a 
but always blows some- 
what downwards, owing 
to the friction of its 
lowest layers with the 
earth. 

The smaller wheels, 
from eight to twenty feet 
in diameter, are usually 
built of steel, and are 
principally used for pump- 
ing water. The wheel is 
kept facing the wind by 
means of a fin or rudder 
projecting behind it, and 
the axle works the pump- 
rod up and down once 
in every revolution, by 
means of a crank. These 
small wheels are pro- 
tected from violent winds 
by a simple mechanism 
which automatically turns 
the edge of the wheel 
instead of its face to the 
wind, whenever the latter 
becomes so strong as to 
endanger the structure. 
Two of our illustrations 
represent these small machines. One, set on 
an immensely high tower, pumps water into a 
tank in the granite tower beside it The 
other, the " Little Briton," is, as its name 
implies, built in this country, and is largely 
used for pumping. 

The larger wheels are usually "geared"; 
that is to say, the revolution of the axle is 
communicated to a vertical shaft by means 
of cogged wheels. In such cases the simple 
rudder is not sufficient to keep the wind- 
wheel in the right direction, because the 
cogged -wheel of the axle tends to lt creep 
Original from 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



io8 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 




THE riTTI,K PRITON"— KMAI I. STKF.L Pt'MMSn IUILU 



round * on that of 
the vertical shaft, 
so as to draw the 
sail out of the wind 
A tail - wheel is 
therefore employ- 
ed, making it quite 
impossible for the 
sail to move except 
when the wind 
shifts. 
Some of our illus- 
trations represent 
the larger mills, 
The Halladay 
wheels, which are 
much used in 
America, have 
blades which are 
fastened together 
in sections. These 
sections are hinged 



on the frame of the wheel, so that 
the blades, when the wheel is reefed, 
present their ends alone to the wind, 
an arrangement which gives the mill 
a peculiar ragged appearance when 
the wind Is very strong, but which is 
very rapid and sensitive in action. 
One of the photographs shows a 
wheel working with a power equal to 
from ten to twenty horsepower, driv- 
ing the machinery of a mill. 

The large wheels used in this 
country are almost all of the Simplex 
type* In this machine, which was 
invented by the windmill engineer, 
Mr, John Titt, every blade is hinged 
at its two ends, and the wheel is 
reefed by the blades turning their 
edges to the wind. The reefing is 
effected automatically when the wind 
becomes too strong, and the same 
result may be attained by means of 
a hand lever, so that the machine 
may be slowed or stopped when 
desired. Some of our illustrations 
show this wind engine, as used for 
pumping water in various ways, and 
for generating electricity and driving 
machinery. 

These engines, of which thousands 
are in use all over the world, have 
practically solved the question put 
forward by Lord Kelvin, in his 
address, M On the Sources of Energy 
in Nature Available to Man for the 




by Google 



DRIVING ROLLER GK1ST MILL. 

ungmal from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



MISS CAYLEY'S ADVENTURES. 



207 



th^t I was coming. How on earth did you 
recognise me ? " 

"Intuition, most likely." 

He stared at me with a sort of suspicion. 
11 Please don't tell me you think me like my 
sister," he went on. '• For though, of course, 
every right-minded man feels — ur — a natural 
respect and affection for the members of his 
family — bows, if I may so say, to the inscrut- 
able decrees of Providence — which has 
mysteriously burdened him with them — still, 
there are points about Lady Georgina which 
I cannot conscientiously assert I approve of." 

I remembered " Marmy's a fool," and held 
my tongue judiciously. 

" I do not resemble her, I hope," he per- 
sisted, with a look which I could almost 
describe as wistful. 

" A family likeness, perhaps," I put in. 
" Family likenesses exist, you know — often 
with complete divergence of tastes and 
character." 

He looked relieved. " That is true. Oh, 
how true ! But the likeness in my case, I 
must admit, escapes me." 

I temporized. " Strangers see these things 
most," I said, airing the stock platitudes. 
"It may be superficial. And, of course, one 
knows that profound differences of intellect 
and moral feeling often occur within the 
limits of a single family." 

" You are quite right," he said, with 
decision. "Georgina's principles are not 
mine. Excuse my remarking it, but you 
seem to be a young lady of unusual penetra- 
tion." 

I saw he took my remark as a compliment. 
What I really meant to say was that a 
commonplace man might easily be brother 
to so clever a woman as Lady Georgina. 

He gathered up his hat, his stick, his 
gloves, his notes, and his typewritten letters, 
one by one, and backed out politely. He 
was a punctilious millionaire. He had risen 
by urbanity to his brother directors, like a 
model guinea-pig. He bowed to us each 
separately as if we had been duchesses. 

As soon as he was gone, Elsie turned to 
me. " Brownie, how on earth did you guess 
it ? They're so awfully different ! " 

" Not at all," I answered. " A few surface 
unlikenesses only just mask an underlying 
identity. Their features are the same ; but his 
are plump; hers, shrunken. Lady Georgina ? s 
expression is sharp and worldly ; Mr. Ashurst's 
is smooth, and bland, and financial. And then 
their manner! Both are fussy; but Lady 
Georgina's is honest, open, ill-tempered 
fuss in ess ; Mr. Ashurst's is concealed under 



by Google 



an artificial mask of obsequious politeness. 
One's cantankerous ; the other's only per- 
nicketty. It's one tune, after ail, in two 
different keys." 

From that day forth, the Urbane Old 
Gentleman was a daily visitor. He took an 
hour at a time at first ; but after a few days, 
the hour lengthened out (apologetically) to 
an entire morning. He " presumed to ask " 
my Christian name the second day, and 
remembered my father — "a man of excellent 
principles." But he didn't care for Elsie to 
work for him. Fortunately for her, other work 
dropped in, once we had found a client, or 
else, poor girl, she would have felt sadly 
slighted. I was glad she had something to 
do ; the sense of dependence weighed 
heavily upon her. 

The Urbane Old Gentleman did not 
confine himself entirely, after the first few 
days, to Stock Exchange literature. He was 
engaged on a Work — he spoke of it always 
with bated breath, and a capital letter was 
implied in his intonation ; the Work was one 
on the Interpretation of Prophecy. Unlike 
Lady Georgina, who was tart and crisp, 
Mr. Marmaduke Ashurst was devout and 
decorous; where she said "pack of fools," 
he talked „ with unction of " the mental 
deficiencies of our poorer brethren." But 
his religious opinions and his stockbroking 
had got strangely mixed up at the wash 
somehow. He was convinced that the British 
nation represented the Lost Ten Tribes of 
Israel— and in particular Ephraim — a matter 
on which, as a mere laywoman, I would not 
presume either to agree with him or to differ 
from him. " That being so, Miss Cayley, we 
can easily understand that the existing com- 
mercial prosperity of England depends upon 
the promises made to Abraham." 

I assented, without committing myself, 
" It would seem to follow." 

Mr. Ashurst, encouraged by so much 
assent, went on to unfold his System of 
Interpretation, which was of a strictly com- 
mercial or company-promoting character. It 
ran like a prospectus. " We have inherited 
the gold of Australia and the diamonds of 
the Cape," he said, growing didactic, and 
lifting one fat forefinger ; " we are now inherit- 
ing Klondike and the Rand, for it is morally 
certain that we shall annex the Transvaal. 
Again, ' the chief things of the ancient moun- 
tains, and the precious things of the everlast- 
ing hills.' What does that mean ? The ancient 
mountains are clearly the Rockies ; can the 
everlasting hills be anything but the Hima- 
layas ? ' For they shall suck of the abundance 

Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



1TO 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



that the matter was so vigorously and success- 
fully taken up. Every year since 1881 has seen 
new improvements in these machines, greater 
power and greater cheapness, until, at 
present, the application of wind-power to the 
production of electricity has proved itself an 
assured economic success, 

In 1887 the French Government decided 
to light a large lighthouse on the coast by 
means of a windmill. The machine was 
successful in its object. Two dynamos, one 
of four and the 
other of sixteen 
horse-power, 
were used in 
light and strong 
winds respec- 
tively, the sub- 
stitution of one 
for the other 
being effected by 
means of an auto- 
matic arrange- 
ment. A system 
of accumulators 
of sufficie n t 
capacity to keep 
the light going 
for three nights 
without wind 
was put in, and 
was found to be 
adequate. 

In the same 
year, Mr. Brush, 
the well -known 
ele c t rician, 
erected, near his 
city house, a 
wind- wheel 56ft. 
in diameter, to 
drive a twenty- 
five horse-power 
dynamo. The 
installation con- 
sists of over 350 
in ca ndescent 
lamps, varying 

from ten to fifty candle-power, as well as 
two arc-lamps and several motors. The 
whole system is absolutely automatic, and 
has run for years without giving any trouble. 

Lieutenant Lewis gives an account of 
another American electric plant which was 
driven for three years by steam, after which 
the engine was replaced by a windmill. 
Every item of expense having been taken 
into account, and the two methods having 
been carefully compared, it was found that 

Digiiiz&d byLrt 




TJNRTY-FIVF-FOOT MILT., PHIVfKG TF^-HOFSF-l'OWttfi! DYNAMO. 



each lamp cost annually, when lighted by 
steam-power, 17s. 4d., and when lighted by 
wind-power, only 8s. 

It is not necessary to multiply examples of 
a fact which has already been sufficiently 
demonstrated not only in America, but also 
in Britain, France, Germany, and Austria. 
An engineer in charge of an installation driven 
by one of Titt's Simplex windmills told the 
writer that he considered a further economy 
might be effected by setting the wheel to 

pump water 
during the very 
gentle breezes 
that are insuffi- 
cient to drive 
the dynamo, 
thus storing up 
energy against 
the time of calm 
otherwise than 
by accumulators, 
or in addition to 
them, Mr, Ran- 
kin Kennedy has 
suggested the 
compression of 
air in steel cham- 
bers for the same 
purpose, and 
other experi- 
ments have been 
made in which 
the windmill was 
made to raise 
sand, which was 
allowed to fall 
upon a wheel 
when energy was 
needed. But it 
is probable that 
the development 
of storage bat- 
teries will con- 
tinue to add 
largely to their 
efficiency while 
diminishing 
these additional 
reserve, white 



in 



their expense, and that 
methods of holding power 
necessarily cumbersome, would also be in 
the end more costly than the simple ac- 
cumulator. 

It is usually said that provision must be 
made for three days of calm. That is to 
say, if the mill is used for pumping water 
supplies, the reserve tank must be large 
enough to hold all the water that is required 
in three days ; if it drives a dynamo, the 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



WINDMILLS— OLD AND NEW. 



in 



accumulators must have a similar capacity. 
This provision is certainly, under most 
circumstances, sufficient, especially if the 
wheel is capable of running with light winds 
of under ten miles an hour* And there 
are places where there are very rarely, or 
never, three days together without a good 
supply of wind at ten miles an hour. But 
in less favourable situations there are, two 
or three times in the year, calms of this 
nature lasting from four to eight or even 
twelve days at a time. Thus, from an exami- 
nation of the daily records of wind-power at 
Greenwich Qbservatory, over a period of 
five successive years, it appears that there 
were repeatedly more than three days 
together without a ten -mile wind. This 
occurred thirteen times in the five years ■ 
most of the calms lasting four or five days, 
but three of them reaching seven days, 
and one of them eleven. From a study 
of Falmouth Observatory records over a 
similar period, it 
appears that a 
windmill, situ- 
ated at that 
place, would not 
once have ex- 
perienced such 
a calm as to 
make the three 
days' reserve in- 
sufficient during 
the five succes- 
sive years. 

Passing from 
the exceptions 
to the rule, we 
find that the 

wind blows at 

speeds exceed- 
ing sixteen miles 

an hour for an 

average of from 

eight to ten 

hours in the 

day, according 

to the situation, 

and that an 

average of from 

sis to seven 

hours more are 

occupied by 

winds of from 

fen to sixteen 

piles an hour. 

The following 

figures, calcu- 



lated from the records of Falmouth Observa- 
tory, represent the number of hours, in one 
year, during which the w T ind blew at the 
speeds indicated :— 

6 and 7 miles an hour, 769 hours. 



8 „ 9 


11 


8l6 


10 „ 11 


IT 


I22S 


** „ 13 


J » 


Sl4 


14 ,* IS 


>1 


724 


16 „ 17 


** 


563 


iS i, 19 


11 


20 „ 21 


„ ■ 


525 


22 tO 24 


t J 


609 


25 and upwards 




1334 




There is* therefore, abundance of wind, 
even if we neglect all winds below ten miles 
an hour. There is no danger of a windmill 
standing idle. And w T e believe that if the 
enormous store of energy that lies in the wind 
were realized, this method of obtaining power 
would be more largely made use of. Wind- 
mills require no fuel ; there is no labour con- 
nected with them, except that of occasionally 

filling the oil- 
cups. Their first 
cost is by no 
means great. A 
35ft wheel, for 
instance, which 
has driven a 
ten- horse -power 
dynamo for the 
last four years, 
at no greater 
expense than 
the interest on 
first cost and de- 
preciation, say, 
altogether, 10 
per cent, cost 
the owner, with 
its tower, only 
^3 20. Undoubt- 
ed 1 y , wind- 
mills have a 
great future be- 
fore them, and 
Lord Kelvin's 
forecast has 
already begun to 
be realized. 

[We arc indebted 
to the U.S. Wind 
Engine and Pump 
Company for pho- 
1 1 (graph* of Ameri- 
can machines, and 
to Mr. Tin, of 
Warminster, for 
our ] I lust rations of 
British windmill*-] 



THIRTY-SIX-FOOT MILL, PLAINING QUARRY WITH NOKIA rUM PS. 

Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



byCiC 



IC 




A Story for Children. 
Translated from the Russian. 



tip 





ONG before you or I were 
born, there lived a King and 
Queen who had an only son, 
called Egor, who was remark- 
ably handsome. As this young 
Prince grew up, his parents 
anxious that he should get 
this was no easy matter, as 



became very 

married ; but 

Prince Egor was very difficult to please, arid 

he had never seemed to care for any of the 

Princesses of his acquaintance. 

u If I am to marry/ 1 said the Prince to his 
father, u my bride must be the most beautiful 
woman ever seen, as well as the cleverest" 

One day, as the Prince was strolling about 
the grounds of the palace, he saw a big, 
black raven sitting upon a tree, and, as he 
looked at the bird, he fancied that it smiled 
upon him, 

" What a curious creature, ,? thought the 
Prince, aloud. '* I wonder whether it can talk ? " 

* g Of course I can ! H answered the raven. 
"That is exactly what lam here for. I have 
something of the utmost importance to com- 
municate to you. You wish to get married, 
do you not?" 

"Not in the least— there you are wrong/ 1 
laughed the Prince. 

"Well, your parents are anxious that you 
should, ami ynu refuse to do so unless you 
meet a Princess who is more beautiful than 
any other woman living?" 

Digitized by GoOQ I C 



The Prince nodded. 

li Very well, then ; I know the very person 
for you." 

u And her name ?" 

" Is Queen Agraphiana the Fair, of the 
Hundred and Thirteenth Kingdom at the 
World's End. It is a long journey." 

" I have heard of her great beauty, cer- 
tainly," said the Prince ; " but 1 always heard 
that she was married." 

I£ Rubbish ! " answered the raven. " Never 
believe what people say. Go in search of 
her as soon as ever you can, and lose no 
time," 

The Prince was intensely amused. However, 
he returned to the palace to prepare for his 
long journey; and in spite of all his parents 
said to him, Egor mounted his horse and 
galloped off towards the Hundred and 
Thirteenth Kingdom at the World's End, 

On rode the Prince, for days and weeks 
and months, until he readied the Hundred 
and Twelfth Kingdom, which he found in a 
great state of disorder. Soldiers were lying 
about dead and wounded in the streets, while 
others were fighting and killing each other 
right and left Just as Prince Egor was 
about to ask the meaning of all this uproar, 
some strong, handsome men in armour came 
galloping along the roads, crying : — 

li Victory ! Long live Queen Agraphiana 

the Fair!" . . 

Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



r 



PRINCE EGOR AND THE RAVEN. 



"3 










HCIITIKG AND KILLING EACH OTHER RIGHT AND LEFT, 



A tremendous cheer arose from all sides, 
and the streets became bright with soldiers of 
all arms. 

" w hat on earth has happened?" asked 
the Prince, at last, of a soldier near him. 

"We, of the Hundred and Thirteenth 
Kingdom, with Queen Agraphiana at our 
head, have defeated these people of the 
Hundred and Twelfth Kingdom." 

11 Where is your Queen ? I should like to 
see her" 

"She is in the camp ; follow me, and I will 
lead you to her." 

They had not gone far before they came to 
an encampment, and out of one of the tents 
Queen Agraphiana the Fair advanced to meet 
them. 

" Hail to you, Prince Egor," she said. 
" Have j iu come as friend, or as foe? n 

" Kriend, of course, most beautiful Queen/' 

"Then you are welcome. You must be 
tired ; you have evidently had a long journey ; 

Vol, *vL-ie 



come in and rest, and if you will stay 
with us in camp for awhile, we shall 
all be glad to have you among us." 

The Prince was charmed j never 
had he seen so beautiful a woman. 
He spent two whole days in Queen 
Agraphiana's society, and, of course, 
fell so much in love with her that he 
married hen 

The young Prince and his bride 
soon left the encampment, and went 
to live in Queen Agraphiana's kingdom, 
where they were extremely happy for 
a long time. 

At last war broke out in the 
Hundred and Eleventh Kingdom, and 
Agraphiana had to join her army, 
but refused to take her husband with 
her, although he begged very hard to 
be allowed to accompany her, 

" No, no," she said, firmly ; "I can 
manage my own affairs quite well 
i don't want to have you run into 
any danger. You can remain here 
and look after the palace and the 
kingdom during my absence- You 
may go where you please, and do 
what you like; but— mind you don't 
open the door of that cupboard, or 
bad luck will attend us," 

The Prince promised to obey h?r, 
though he was sorely disappointed 
at not being allowed to go with her 
and fight ; however, as there was no 
help for it, he determined to do his 
best to amuse himself at home, while 
his wife did the fighting- 
He did not venture anywhere near the 
mysterious cupboard, until one day, when he 
ft It particularly dull, and did not know what 
to do with himself, He had been strolling 
about the palace, when he suddenly found 
himself opposite the forbidden cupboard ! 
He hesitated, looked at it, and then laughed. 
" How ridiculous ! " he exclaimed. " What 
possible harm could happen if I open that 
little door?" 

So he turned the key and— entered ! 
Right in front of him, hanging from the 
ceiling by one hundred and thirteen iron 
chains, was a hideous-looking skeleton ! 

" Beware, my Prince, beware E " cried a 
voice, and on looking round, Egor beheld his 
old friend, the raven. 

"What harm tan an old, deceased skeleton 
do to me ? " asked the Prince, 

But the only answer he got from the bird 
was, " Beware ! " 

Have mercy on me,- Prince Egor," groaned 
L,, VERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



IT4 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



the skeleton. " I am so thirsty, give me water. 
My throat is so dry, I have hung here for 
over twelve years without a morsel of food, 
and without a drop to drink." 

The Prince felt very sorry for the wretched 
creature, and in 
spite of another 
mournful " He- 
ware ! n from the 
raven, he fetched 
two huge pails of 
water and poured 
the contents 
down the skele- 
ton's throat. 
After a moment's 
silence, the skele- 
ton shook him- 
self, and with a 
tremendous 
wrench forced 
the iron chains 
asunder, and was 
once more free. 

'* I am more 
than grateful," 
said the skeleton, 
giving the Prince 
his bony hand ; 
"but 1 am afraid 
you won't see 
Queen Agra- 
phiana again, for 
now she shall be 
mine by right of 
conquest," 

So saying, the 
skeleton took a 
great leap out of 
the window and 

disappeared, leaving the astonished Prince in 
a state of great misery, 

" Well," said the familiar voice of the raven, 
"you have rushed upon your fate-" 

The Prince took no notice of the bird, but 
sat by the window and wept 

" Look ! " cried the raven ; " there they go ! " 

Prince Egor looked up, out of the window, 
and was horrified to see the wretched 
skeleton fly past him carrying the beautiful 
Queen Agraphiana in his arms, 

" Miserable wretch that I am ! " cried the 
Prince, " What am I to do ? " 

"Dry your eyes,' 1 advised the raven, "and 
follow the skeleton like a man ; try and get 
her back, and smash him to atoms ! That is 
what you have got to do." 

41 But whither have they flown ? How can I 
follow ? " asked the Prince. 




KICHT IN FRONT tiV If IM WAS A HlbEOl'S-LOOKING SKELETON 



1/ How can 



"They have gone to the skeleton's dominion, 
which is the Two Hundred and Twenty-sixth 
at the Other Side of the World's End. But 
before you attempt to rescue the Queen, you 
must secure a certain horse, which will enable 

you and your 
wife to escape in 
safety from the 
skeleton. Now, 
to find that horse 
you will have to 
cross the fiery 
river, and call on 
an old witch to 
whom this horse 
belongs, and 
whose friendship 
you must gain — 
which will be no 
light task — still, 
you must try. I 
will be at hand 
to advise you. 
Here is a silver 
whistle \ take it* 
and when you 
come to the fiery 
river, sound the 
whistle three 
times, and a very 
high bridge will 
appear, so high 
that the flames 
will not reach 
you when you 
cross, and it will 
remain there 
until you use 
your whistle 
again* 1 ' 
Prince Egor thanked the raven, and started 
off at once to the skeleton's dominion. On, 
on, he walked, for days and weeks, until he 
came to the fiery river, which he crossed by 
means of the magic bridge that appeared the 
moment he whistled for it* At last he came 
to a curious - looking hut, .standing on 
chickens' legs, and which was surrounded by 
a hundred poles, on ninety nine of which 
were human skulls. 

rvince Egor did not stop to look at them, 
but entered die hut, in which sat a hideous 
old witch. "Good day, to you," he said " I 
have come to serve you as groom, if you 
will have me." 

"By all means," replied the witch; "and 
what wages do you require?" 

"None '-.I onhfc want one of your 

■vM'lT^F»IGi!N am Sim, " y 



PRINCE EGOR AND THE RAVEN. 



"5 



i 

I 



famished, and should like something to eat 
and drink." 

The old witch gave him as much as he 
wanted, and then told him to go to bed. 

11 You must get up early in the morning," 
she said, "and take my 
horses out for an airing; 
but take care, and don't / * 

lose them, or your head // l 

will add to the decorations ( 

of rny outer wall. 1 ' 

\Y\t morning Prince 




"PRINCE ETiOS FNTEK£1> the 



Egor went to the stables, and let all the 
horses out, but he had hardly done so, when 
the animals snorted and neighed and galloped 
off as hard as ever they could, and before 
Prince Egor knew what had taken place, they 
were out of sight. The Prince was in 
despair, and began to wonder what he had 
better do, when, to his delight, he beheld 
the raven. 

u Do not fret/ 3 said the bird, " I will send 
all the horses safely home ; meanwhile, you 
go back and enter the very last stable, where 
you will find a mangy pony lying in a corner, 
which is the horse for you. lake it, and at 
midnight mount him and ride away as hard 
as ever you can." 

Away went the Prince to the stable, sad- 
dled the sick pony, and waited, Presently 
he heard the horses all come galloping 
home. 



" What made you come back, you idiots ? " 
he heard the witch ask them, angrily, 

" We could not help ourselves/ 1 they 
answered; *'the moment we got into the 
forest, a number of wild birds and beasts 

surrounded us 
and drove us 
back." 

"Well, next 
time he lets you 
out, you must on 
no account re- 
turn," 

At midnight, 
when all was 
silent, Prince 
Egor rode away 
to the fiery river ; 
he whistled three 
times, and im- 
mediately the 
bridge appeared. 
When he had 
crossed, the raven 
flew down upon 
his shoulder, 
saying : — 

" Leave the 
bridge as it is, 
for the witch will 
and 
half- 
way across you 
may whistle, and 
the flames will 
devour her as she 
falls through the 
breaking bridge ; 
otherwise she 
a bridge of her own, which you 
would not be able to destroy." 

When the witch awoke and found that 
both the Prince and the mangy pony were 
missing, she flew into a terrific rage and gave 
chase, 

" A bridge I * she cried, when she arrived 
at the fiery riven " What luck ; just what I 
wanted." 

But just as she got half-way across, Prince 
Egor whistled, and down went the bridge, 
sending the old witch head-over-heels into 
the flames, which immediately devoured her. 
Prince Egor then, by the raven's advice, took 
his pony to a lake hard by, and made it drink 
until it became quite well and strong again, 
and was transformed into a handsome and 
powerful horse. 

At last, alftfictfiree days' hard riding, the 
Princ e|J ^ !R .^ v t 9F t^ c ^ ff n' S gloomy 



pursue you, 
when she is 



might erect 



n6 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



palace, where he was thankful to hear that 
the skeleton was out hunting, but that Queen 
Agraphiana was in, 

On hearing his voice, the Queen rushed 
out to meet him, 

"Oh, my Prince, my Prince, where have 
you been all this long, long time ? I thought 
you never would come to save me, ;j she said. 



'* Prince Egor has been to the palace, and 
has carried away the Queen," replied the 
horse, 

" But we shall overtake them." 

" I am not so sure of that, as the Prince 
has secured the best horse in the witch's 
stables." 

" Never mind, let us try our best." 




PRINCE EGOR WHISTLED. AND DOWN WENT THE HtDGST 



Prince Egor told her where he had been 
and what he had done, 

" Ah, why did you not listen to me, my 
Prince ? You would have been saved all this 
terrible worry.'' 

"Newer mind, dear one, let us lose no 
time, but fly from here at once before the 
skeleton returns.' 5 

11 But he will overtake us ! " 

li I doubt it, as I have secured a splendid 
horse which runs faster than any bird can fly." 

The young couple seated themselves on 
the animal and galloped off. 

Meanwhile the skeleton, returning home- 
wards, was surprised to find his horse remark- 
ably restive* 

" What is the rnatter? ,T he asked ; u is there 
trouble in the air?" 

O 



After a long and anxious ride, the skeleton 
came in sight of the Prince and Queen Agra- 
phiana, and, quickening his pace, he was about 
to draw his sword, when the Prince's horse sud- 
denly turned round, and go Hoping straight up to 
the skeleton, knocked him off his saddle on to 
the ground, then rushing at him, he trampled 
upon hi in and crushed every bit of life out 
of the hideous creature. Queen Agraphiana 
then mounted the skeleton's horse and rode 
away with Prince Egor to her own kingdom, 
where they lived happily for many a long 
year ; occasionally visiting Prince Egor's 
parents, who were delighted with their 
daughter-in-law. As for the raven, he estab- 
lished himself in the palace, and was Prince 
Egor's greatest pet, as well as his most 
faithful friWaginaTfronn 

IVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



Curiosities? 



[ Wt shall be glad to recent Contributions to this sect ion ^ and to pay for suck di are accefiied*] 

BICYCLE REPAIR* EXTRAORDINARY. 
11 The inclosed phottigraph," writes Mr* Chris, S + 
Pou Her, of 57, Belvedere Run el, Upper Norwood, 
11 was sent me by Mr. S* J, Nash, of Pietershurg, in 
l he Transvaal, with l he suggestion that it might be of 
sufficient interest for the ' Curiosities/ It shows a 





bicycle wheel teinjwjrarily repaired by a Boer, the 
spokes being cut from the hush and fitted with a 
pocket -knife. The Boer rode the machine in this 
condition nearly all the way from Pretoria to Pieters- 
burg, a distance of 160 miles. One of the pedals 
was replaced by a peg of wood." 

ELEPHANT ON WHICH THE QUEEN RODE. 

The elephant seen 
in this photo, had the 
honour of carry- 
ing the Queen when 
Bo&toek and Womb* 
well's Menagerie 
first visited Windsor 
Castle, in 1847. The 
animal is still alive, 
though it has now 
attained the venerable 
age of, IOZ years. It 
weighs j tons 6cwL, 
and stands oft, 31 n. 
in height, "the band 
w;i^on t Lhe front of 
which is seen in the 
photo-, was presented 
to Mr, Womb well 
by Her Majesty on 
the same date. The 
proprietors claim that 
this Royal elephant is 
the largest and oldest 
in captivity. Photo, 
sent in by Mr. R, 
M. Stone, " Warbla," 
Paignton, S- Devon. 



"TIT BITS" RECOVERED FROM THE SEA. 
The copy of Tit- Bits se^n in this photo* was 
recovered from the wreck of the steamer Oregon ^ 
Bunk oft" I^ong Island, near New York, on her voyage 
from Liverpool, in March, 1SS6. " It was,* 1 writes Mr. 
Lionel L. W. Penson, of 5, Elliott Park, Blackhcath, 
M addressed 10 myself at Renfrew, Ontario, Canada, 
and the address is plainly visible on the original, 
though, of course, much faded through its long 
immersion in the salt water. I do not know exactly 
how long the mails were at the bottom of the sea, 
but I did not get this copy of Tit-Bits until the 
following Ociol«r," 




! Copyi 



***** %* 



G«ri$c Nc*»tt, Liiti'lEftl 1 1 

VERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



nS 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 




THE CENTRE OF ENGLAND. 
The pillar seen in the photograph reproduced altove 
is situated in the village of Meriden, which is about 
five niil^s from the city of Coventry, and was erected 
expressly to show the centre of the entire country of 
England. No doubt captious critics will come along 
and dispute the correctness of the placing of this 
pillar, hut the people responsible for its erection 
must have felt pretty certain of their liearinjjs 
before going to the trouble of establishing this 
interesting column. We are indebted for the photo- 
graph to Mr. \V. Bowman, of Yard ley Road, 
Acocks Green, Rirmingham. 




A DISAPPOINTED HAWK. 
This interesting snap-shot was sent in and taken by 
Mr. W, J. BninclK of 7, Star St reel t London, W. It 
was taken Inst summer at Waddesdoii, in Bucks. Mr. 
Brunei I was trying to photograph some sparrows feed- 
ing round a trap, and suddenly this sparrow-hawk 
appeared* 1[ I was inside an old barn/' says Mr* 
Bmnell, "focusing the spar row -trap (made of bricks) 
whilst several were fee r ling off the crumbs around, 
when suddenly down pounced this sparrow-hawk, 
only to find that he was too late. He is obviously 
angry at having missed his prey." / 

Digitized by \j0091C 




Pt&tn eQjryriffht tterttn-itkota. fry Underwood it UmUnwKni. 
I CK BLOSSOMS. 

There is no more lieautiful subject for the amateur 
photographer than the fantastic vagaries of frost. You 
have doubtless all seen photographs of spiders* wehs 
covered with hoar -frost, photographs of exceedingly 
lovely " frost- flowers, " and other really beautiful 
pictures of a like kind. In the photograph we repro- 
duce here we have a group of skeletons of hemlock 
blossoms* each of which has Income filled with a tiny 
globe of ice, so that the whole resembles a veritable 
bunch of fairy " frost -flowers,'* 




SPIDERS WEB ON A CLOCK WHKKL. 

Mr. L, S. St am, 44, Park Street, Wellington, 
Salop, writes : "This is a photograph of a spider's 
web on the wheel of an ordinary clock. You will 
notice thai the web rises from the face to the spindle 
of the wheel, and ihe most peculiar thing of all was 
that the clock was going at the time of the discovery, 
so that the spinning of this elaborate web appa- 
rently made not the slightest difference to the work- 
ing of the clock." It seems even more remarkable 
that the working of the clock made no difference to 
the spider, 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



CURIOSITIES. 



119 




A HEN THAT NURSED EIGHT PUPPIES, 
This photo* was taken at Mr. Ward's p the fish- 
monger, of Berkhampstead, The hen took to this 
litler of eight spaniel puppies when they were only a 
few days nkl t and though driven away several Limes, 
*hc returned to her queer charges and kept by them 
every day in an open shed. The pups were a I rout a 
month old when the photo* was taken, and they 
appeared to enjoy the attention of their strange foster 
mother* When they grew too big to be covered* the 
hen would sit in the middle of the liiter, with her 
wings extended. Photo, sent in and taken by Mr, 
I. T. Newman, of Berk ham pstead. 




a cloi;k: made o* egg-shells. 
This wonderful timepiece is the work of Mr. C 
W, Croydon, of 5^ and 52, Tavern Street, Ipswich. 
The clock consists of seven eg£-she1]s arranged on fine 
steel wires, and by some complex mechanism they arc 
made to revolve so as accurately lo record the seconds, 
minutes, hours* days, months, rise and fall of the 
tide t and phases of the moon, which are indicated by 
She stationary hand in front of each egg. While the 
second and minute eggs are gradually moving round 
at their respective rates, the hour egg does not 
onril sixty minutes have been recorded. 




" j "& ■««"« 



AN ILLITERATE SIGN-POST. 
We are indebted to Mr. H. S + Sachs, of [6, 
llonley Road, Catford, for this curiosity. This sign- 
post, which has many curious errors of spelling, is 
placed just at the top of toasted Hill The names 
of places should read respectively, " To Bra&ted and 
Sund ridge," 1 "To Brasted Slat ion/' and "To Knock- 
holt and Halsled." 

" NATURES TRANS- 
FORMATION.* 

This is in reality 
an old shoe* cast by 
a tramp in a Suirey 
lane, and transformed 
by Nature into what 
looks like a beautiful 
embroidered slipper. 
The shoe is covered 
with moss and vege- 
tation, and when 
found looked ex- 
tremely pretty. It 
must have taken 
some years to be- 
come covered in this 
way. The photo, was 
sent in by Mr. K. M. 
Ball, Ashhurton 
Cottage, Putmjflq 

Heath ' UNIVERSIT 




120 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 




A TROUBLESOME HORSE, 
Here is a strikingly good snap-shot 
of a restive horse, sent in by Mr, J, 
F. Cornish, 3, Chal loner Street, West 
Kensington j W, It was taken in 
Dundee by Mr* Cornish's son, It 
seems i in possible to imagine a horse 
assuming a more erect attitude than 
t his. The progress of the two gentle- 
men in the trap way a very eventful 
one during more than a quarter of a 
mile of this kind of restive prancing* 

A TULIP THAT GREW UNDER 
DIFFICULTIES. 

This remarkable curiosity was sent 
in by Mr. Frank W, Mugford, of 
Be m ley House, Woodford Green* 
14 You will notice," writes this gen- 
tleman, " that the leaves of the tulip 
are encircled by the outer ring of an 
ordinary linen shirt button. The 
tulip was one erf several hundreds in a 
burl, and, noticing its cramped appear- 
a net% I examined it closely. No 
doubt the tulip must have picked up 
the but ton -ling the moment the first 
shoot emerged from the ground." 





BURIED TO THE NECK IN SAND, 
Here is an extremely curious 
photo,, for which we are indebted to 
Mr. M. Ourarther, 310, Marylelione 
Road, The photo, shows us a little 
girl buried right up to the neck in 
sand, which, owing to the bright 
light p has almost the appearance of 
snow. The presence of the dog also 
adds 10 the effect of the piciure, and 
gives it the appearance of a spirited 
rescue from snuw. 



A GIGANTIC ROSE-TREE. 
California is noted all the world 
over as possessing an ideal climate, 
bul it would l>e difficult to conceive 
anything thai could give a better 
idea of the luxuriant richness of the 
vegetation in this favoured State than 
the photograph here reproduced, 
which shows a gigantic rose-tree, 
literally one mass of gorgeous, glow- 
ing blossoms. We are indebted for 
this interesting photo., which was 
taken by Jarvis, Pasadena, Cab, to 
Mrs. Laura B. Starr > of 11 86, Lex- 
in? ton Avenue, New York City. 







'Or.- " i§gy\ '■ ' bf" ;■ 


£ 


|"^- ■ JH^MHV^HH * ™5^™«»^ ^jii;n^|HSMiJi;^i^BH 



'VERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



(""rw^nL'' Original from 

by VjUU^IC UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



■ l|iiH:.' . "■ '' '• ■ ■ - : f 



| f:| 










" BEFORE THE IRON DOOR WAS MMR KOLUCHY HERSELF." 



{Ste pagi 136, 

by& le 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



The Strand Magazine. 



Vol. xvi. 



AUGUST, 1898. 



No. 92. 



The Brotherhood of the Seven Kings. 

By L. T. Meade and Robert Eustace. 
VIIL— THE MYSTERY OF THE STRONG ROOM. 




ATE in the autumn of that 
same year Mme. Koluchy was 
once more back in town. 
There was a warrant out for 
the arrest of Lockhart, who 
had evidently fled the country ; 
but Madame, still secure in her own in- 
vincible cunning, was at large. The firm 
conviction that she was even now preparing 
a mine for our destruction was the reverse of 
comforting, and Dufrayer and I spent marly 
gloomy moments as we thought over the 
possibilities of our future. 

On a certain evening towards the latter 
end of October I went to dine with my 
friend. I found him busy arranging his 
table, which was tastefully decorated, and 
laid for three. 

" An unexpected guest is coming to dine," 
he said, as I entered the room. " I must 
speak to you alone before he arrives. Come 
into the smoking-room ; he may be here at 
any moment." 

I followed Dufrayer, who closed the door 
behind us. 

" I must tell you everything and quickly/ 7 
he began, " and I must also ask you to be 
guided by me. I have consulted with Tyler, 
and he says it is our best course." 

"Well?" I interrupted. 

" The name of the man who is coming 
here to-night is Maurice Carlton," continued 
Dufrayer. " His mother was a Greek, but 
on the father's side he comes of a good old 
English stock. He inherited a place in 
Norfolk, Cor Castle, from his father ; but 
the late owner lost heavily on the turf, 
and in consequence the present man has 
endeavoured to retrieve his fortunes as 
a diamond merchant. I met him some 
years ago in Athens. He has been wonder- 
fully successful, and is now, I believe — 
or, at least, so he says — one of the richest 
men in Europe. He called upon me with 
regard to some legal business, and in the 

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course of conversation referred incidentally 
to Mme. Koluchy. I drew him out, and 
found that he knew a good deal about her, 
but what their actual relations are I cannot 
say. I was very careful not to commit 
myself, and after consideration decided to 
ask him to dine here to-night in order that 
we both might see him together. I have 
thought over everything carefully, and am 
quite sure our only course now is not to 
mention anything we know about MadSme. 
We may only give ourselves away in doing so. 
By keeping quiet we shall have a far better 
chance of seeing what she is up to. You 
agree with me, don't you?" 

" Surely, we ought to acquaint Carlton 
with her true character ? " I replied. 

Dufrayer shrugged his shoulders im- 
patiently. 

" No," he said, " we have played that game 
too often, and you know what the result has 
been. Believe me, we shall serve both his 
interests and ours best by remaining quiet. 
Carlton is living now at his own place, but 
comes up to London constantly. About two 
years ago he married a young English lady, 
who was herself the widow of an Italian. 
I believe they have a son, but am not quite 
sure. He seems an uncommonly nice 
fellow himself, and I should say his wife was 
fortunate in her husband ; but, there, I hear 
his ring — let us go into the next room." 

We did so, and the next moment Carlton 
appeared. Dufrayer introduced him to me, 
and soon afterwards we went into the dining- 
room. Carlton was a handsome man, built 
on a somewhat massive scale. His face was 
of the Greek type, but his physique that of 
an Englishman. He had dark eyes, some- 
what long and narrow, and apt, except when 
aroused, to wear a sleepy expression. It 
needed but a glance to show that in his 
blood was a mixture of the fiery East, with 
the nonchalance and suppression of all feel- 
ing which characterize John Bull. A§ I 

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^ 



i _ <^»* ^3 

" THE ME XT MOM EST CAHLTON AHPfiAKliU.*' 

watched him, without appearing to do so, I 
came to the conclusion that I had seldom 
seen more perfect self-possession, or stronger 
indications of suppressed power. 

As the meal proceeded t conversation grew 
brisk and brilliant, Carlton talked well, and, 
led on by Dufrayer, gave a short resume of 
his life since they had last met. 

"Yes," he said, "I am uncommonly lucky, 
and have done pretty well on the? whole. 
Diamond dealing, as perhaps you know, is 
one of the most risky things that any man 
can take up, but my early training gave me a 
sound knowledge of the business, and I think 
I know what I am about. There is no trade 
to which the art of swindling has been more 
applied than to mine ; but, there, I have had 
luck, immense luck, such as does not come 
to more than one man in a hundred." 

" I suppose you have had some pretty ex- 
citing moments,' ? I remarked. 

"No, curiously enough, 7 ' he replied; " I 
have personally never had any very exciting 
times. Big deals, of course, are often anxious 
moments, but beyond the natural anxiety to 
carry a large thing through, my career lias 
been fairly simple. Some of my acquaint- 
ances, however, have not been so lucky, and 
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over, he leant back in his 



one in particular is just going through a rare 
experience." 

" Indeed," I answered ; Ci are you at liberty 
to tell us what it is? " 

He glanced from one of us to the other. 

" I think so," he said. " Perhaps you have 
already heard of the great Roche vi He dia- 
mond?" 

" No," I remarked ; "tell us about it, if you 
will." 

Dinner being 
chair and helped himself to a cigar, 

" It is curious how few people know about 
this diamond, 7 " he said, "although it is one of 
the most beautiful stones in the world. For 
actual weight, of course, many of the well- 
known stones can beat it- It weighs exactly 
eighty- two carats, and is an egg-shaped stone 
with a big indented hollow at the smaller end ; 
but for lustre and brilliance I have never 
seen its equal. It has had a curious history. 
For centuries it was in the possession of an 
Indian Maharajah it was bought from him 
by an American millionaire, and passed 
through my hands some ten years ago. I 
would have given anything to have kept it, 
but my finances were not so prosperous as 
they are now, and 1 had to let it go. A 
Russian baron bought it and took it to Naples, 
where it was stolen. This diamond was lost 
to the world till a couple of months ago, when 
it turned up in this country." 

When Carlton mentioned Naples, the happy 
hunting-ground of the Brotherhood, Dyfrayer 
glanced at me. 

"But there is a fatality about its owner- 
ship," he continued; "it has again dis- 
appeared." 

« How ? " I cried. 

"I wish I could tell you/* he answered. 
" The circumstances of its loss are as 
follows : A month ago my wife and I 
were staying with an old friend, a relation 
of my mother's, a merchant named Michael 
Roden, of Rod en Freres, Comb ill, the great 
dealers, Roden said he had a surprise for 
me, and he showed me the Roche villc 
diamond. He told me that he had bought 
it from a Cingalese dealer in London, and 
for a comparatively small price," 

"What is its actual value?" interrupted 
Dufrayer* 

" Roughly, I should think about fifteen 
thousand pounds, but I believe Roden 
secured it for ten* Well, poor chap, he has 
now lost both the stone and his money- My 
firm belief is that what he bought was an 
imitation, though how a man of his experi- 
ence could h^ve done such a thing is pasl 

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THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE SEVEN KINGS. 



"5 



knowledge. This is exactly what happened. 
Mrs. Carlton and I, as I have said, we-re 
staying down at his place in Staffordshire, 
and he had the diamond with him. At my 
wife's request, for she possesses a most intel- 
ligent interest in precious stones, he took us 
down to his strong room, and showed it to us. 
He meant to have it set for his own wife, 
who is a very beautiful woman. The next 
morning he took the diamond up to town, 
and Mrs. Carlton and I returned to Cor 
Castle. I got a wire from Roden that same 
afternoon, begging me to come up at once. 
I found him in a state of despair. He 
showed me the stone, to all appearance 
identically the same as the one we had 
looked at on the previous evening, and 
declared that it had just beer proved to be 
an imitation. He- said it was the most 
skilful imitation he had ever seen. We put 
it to every known test, and there was no 
doubt whatever that it was not a diamond. 
The specific gravity test was final on this 
point. The problem now is : Did he buy the 
real diamond which has since been stolen or 
an imitation ? He swears that the Roche- 
ville diamond was in his hands, that he 
tested it carefully at the time ; he also says 
that since it came into his possession it was 
absolutely impossible for anyone to steal it, 
and yet that the theft has been committed 
there is very little doubt. At least one thing 
is clear, the stone which he now possesses is 
not a diamond at all." 

" Has anything been discovered since ? " 
I asked. 

"Nothing," replied Carlton, rising as he 
spoke, " and never will be, I expect. Of one 
thing there is little doubt. The shape and 
peculiar appearance of the Rocheville diamond 
are a matter of history to all diamond dealers, 
and the maker of the imitation must have had 
the stone in his possession for some consider- 
able time. The facsimile is absolutely and 
incredibly perfect." 

" Is it possible," said Dufrayer, suddenly, 
" that the strong room in Roden's house could 
have been tampered with ? " 

"You would scarcely say so if you knew 
the peculiar make of that special strong room," 
replied Carlton. " I think I can trust you 
and your friend with a somewhat important 
secret. Two strong rooms have been built, 
one for me at Cor Castle, and one for my 
friend Roden at his place in Staffordshire. 
These rooms are constructed on such a 
peculiar plan, that the moment any key 
is inserted in the lock electric bells 
%t% set ringing within. These bells are 

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connected in each case with the bed- 
room of the respective owners. Thus you 
will see for yourselves that no one could 
tamper with the lock without immediately 
giving such an alarm as would make any 
theft impossible. My friend Roden and I 
invented these • special safes, and got them 
carried out on plans of our own. We both 
believe that our most valuable stones are 
safer in our own houses than in our places 
of business in town. But, stay, gentlemen, 
you shall see for yourselves. Why should 
you not both come down to my place for a 
few days' shooting? I shall then have 
the greatest possible pleasure in showing 
you my strong rpom. You may be inter- 
ested, too, in seeing some of my collection — 
I flatter myself, a unique one. The weather 
is perfect just now for shooting, and I have 
plenty of pheasants, also room enough and 
to spare. We are a big, cheerful party, and 
the lioness of the season is with us, Mme. 
Koluchy." 

As he said the last words both Dufrayer 
and I could not refrain from starting. 
Luckily it was not noticed —my hoart beat 
fast. 

" It is very kind of you," I said. " I shall 
be charmed to come." 

Dufrayer glanced at me, caught my eye, 
and said, quietly : — 

" Yes, I think I can get away. I will come, 
with pleasure." 

"That is right. I will expect you both next 
Monday, and will send to Durbrook Station 
to meet you> by any train you like to name." 

We promised to let him know at what 
time we should be likely to arrive, and soon 
afterwards he left us. When he did so we 
drew our chairs near the fire. 

" Well, we are in for it now," said Dufrayer. 
" Face to face at last —what a novel experience 
it will be ! Who would believe that we were 
living in the dreary nineteenth century? But, 
of course, she may not stay when she hears 
we are coming." 

" I expect she will," I answered ; " she has 
no fear. Halloa ! who can this be now ? " 
I added, as the electric bell of the front door 
suddenly rang. 

" Perhaps it is Carlton back again," said 
Dufrayer ; "lam not expecting anyone." 

The next moment the door was opened, 
and our principal agent, Mr. Tyler himself, 
walked in. 

" Good evening, gentlemen," he said. " I 
must apologize for this intrusion, but import- 
ant news has just reached me, and the very 
last you would exnect to hesr." He chuckled 

r L] If I d 

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It is a very 



as he spoke. u Mme. Koluchy's house in 
We I beck Street was broken into a month 
ago. I am told that the place was regularly 
sacked She was away in her yacht at the 
time, after the attempt on your life, Mr* 
Head ; and it is supposed that the place was 
unguarded. Whatever the reason, she has 
never reported the burglary, and Ford at 
Scotland Yard has only just got wind of it 
He suspects that it was done by the same 
gang that broke into the jeweller's in 
Piccadilly some months ago, 
curious case," 

" Do you think it is one 
of her own gang that has 
rounded on her ? " I asked. 

" Hardly," he replied ; 
" I do not believe any of 
them would dare to. No, 
it is an outside job, but 
Ford is watching the matter 
for the official force," 

ct Mr. Dufrayer and I 
happen to know where 
Madame Koluchy is at the 
present moment," I said 

I then gave Tyler a brief 
risnmk of our interview 
with Carlton, and told him 
that it was our intention to 
meet Madame face to face 
early in the following week. 

" What a splendid piece 
of luck ! " he cried, rub- 
bing his hands with ill- 
suppressed excitement, 
" With your acumen, Mr, 
Head j you will be certain 
to find out something, and 
we shall have her at last 
I only wish the chance were 
mine k JJ 

" Well, have yourself in 
readiness,' 1 said Dufrayer; 
"we may have to telegraph 
to you at a moment's 
notice. Be sure we shall 
not leave a stone unturned 
to get Madame to commit 
herself. For my part," he 
added, "although it seems 
scarcely credible, I strongly suspect that she 
is at the bottom of the diamond mystery," 

It was late in the afternoon on the follow- 
ing Monday, and almost dark, when we 
arrived at Cor Castle. Carlton himself met 
us at the nearest railway station, and drove 
us to the house, which was a fine old pile, 
with a castellated roof and a large Elizabethan 



wing. The place had been extensively 
altered and restored, and was replete with 
every modern comfort, 

Carlton led us straight into the centre hall, 
calling out in a cheerful tone to his wife as 
he did so. 

A slender, very fair and girlish-looking 
figure approached* She held out her hand, 
gave us each a hearty greeting, and invited 
us to come into the centre of a circle of 
young people who were gathered round a 
huge, old-fashioned hearth, on which logs of 




> 



* * 



•*ftrf'A 



SHE rsAVE v*5 EACH A HEARTY GREETING. 



wood blazed and crackled cheerily. Mrs, 
Carlton introduced us to one or two of the 
principal guests, and then resumed her place 
at a table on which a silver tea-service was 
placed. It needed hut a brief glance to 
show us that amongst the party was Mme. 
Koluchy, She w r as standing near her hostess T 
and just as my eye caught hers she bent and 

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THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE SEVEN KINGS. 



127 



said a word in her ear. Mrs. Carlton coloured 
almost painfully, looked from her to me, and 
then once more rising from her seat came 
forward one or two steps. 

" Mr. Head," she said, " may I introduce 
you to my great friend, Mme. Koluchy? 
By the way, she tells me that you are old 
acquaintances." 

"Very old acquaintances, am I not 
right?" said Mme. Koluchy, in her clear, 
perfectly well-bred voice. She bowed to me 
and then held out her hand. I ignored the 
proffered hand and bowed coldly. She 
smiled in return. 

" Come and sit near me, Mr. Head," she 
said ; " it is a pleasure to meet you again ; 
you have treated me very badly of late. 
You have never come once to see me." 

" Did you expect me to come ? " I replied, 
quietly. There was something in my tone 
which caused the blood to mount to her 
face. She raised her eyes, gave me a bold, 
full glance of open defiance, and then said, 
itra soft voice; which scarcely rose above a 
whisper : — 

" No, you are too English." 

Then she turned to our hostess, who was 
seated not a yard away. 

"You forget your duties, Leonora. Mr. 
Head is waiting for his tea." 

" Oh, I beg a thousand pardons," said Mrs. 
Carlton. " I did not know I had forgotten 
you, Mr. Head." She gave me a cup at once, 
but as she did so, her hand shook so much 
that the small, gold -mounted and jewelled 
spoon rattled in the saucer. 

44 You are tired, Nora," said Mme. Koluchy ; 
u may I not relieve you of your duties ? " 

" No, no, I am all right," was the reply, 
uttered almost pettishly. " Do not take any 
notice just now, I beg of you." 

Madame turned to me. 

" Come and talk to me," she said, in the 
imperious tone of a Sovereign addressing a 
subject. She walked to the nearest window, 
and I followed her. 

" Yes," she said, at once, " you are too 
English to play your part well. Cannot you 
recognise the common courtesies of warfare ? 
Are you not sensible to the gallant attentions 
of the duellist ? You are too crude. If our 
great interests clash, there is every reason why 
we should be doubly polite when we do 
meet." 

"You are right, Madame, in speaking of 
us as duellists," I whispered back, " and the 
duel is not over yet." 

" No, it is not," she answered. 

11 1 have the pertinacity of my country- 

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men," I continued. " It is hard to rouse us, 
but when we are roused, it is a fight to grim 
death." 

She said nothing further. At that moment 
a young man of the party approached. She 
called out to him in a playful tone to 
approach her side, and I withdrew. 

At dinner that night Madame's brilliancy 
came into full play. There was no subject 
on which she could not talk— she was at once 
fantastic, irresponsible, and witty. Without 
the slightest difficulty she led the conversation, 
turning it into any channel she chose. Our 
host hung upon her words as if fascinated ; 
indeed, I do not think there was a man of the 
party who had eyes or ears for anyone else. 

I had gone down to dinner with Mrs. 
Carlton, and in the intervals of watch- 
ing Mme. Koluchy I could not help 
observing her. She belonged to the fair- 
haired and Saxon type, and when very 
young must have been extremely pretty 
— she was pretty still, but not to the close 
observer. Her face wa$ too thin and too 
anxious, the colour in her cheeks was almost 
fixed ; her hair, too, showed signs of receding 
from the temples, although the fashionable 
arrangement of the present day prevented 
this being specially noticed. 

While she talked to me I could not help 
observing that her attention wandered, that 
her eyes on more than one occasion met 
those of Madame, and that when this 
encounter took place the younger woman 
trembled quite perceptibly. It was easy to 
draw my own conclusions. The usual thing 
had happened. Madame was not spending 
her time at Cor Castle for nothing — our 
hostess was- in her power. Carlton himself 
evidently knew nothing of this. With such 
an alliance, mischief of the usual intangible 
nature was brewing. Could Dufrayer and I 
stop it ? Beyond doubt there was more going 
on than met the eye. 

As these thoughts flashed through my 
brain, I held myself in readiness, every 
nerve tense and taut. To play my part as 
an Englishman should I must have, above 
all things, self-possession. So I threw myself 
into the conversation. I answered Madame 
back in her own coin, and presently, in an 
argument which she conducted with rare 
brilliance, we had the conversation to our- 
selves. But all the time, as I talked and 
argued, and differed from the brilliant Italian, 
my glance was on Mrs. Carlton. I noticed 
that a growing restlessness had seized her, that 
she was listening to us with feverish and 
intense eagerness, and that her eyes began to 

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wear a hunted expression. She ceased to 
play her part as hostess, and looked from ine 
to Mme. Koluchy as one under a spell. 

Just before we retired for the night Mrs. 
Carlton came up and took a seat near me 
in the drawing -runm. Machine was not in 
the room, having gone with Dufrayer, Carlton, 
and several other members of the party to 
the billiard - room, Mrs. Carlton looked 
eagerly and nervously round her Her 
manner was decidedly embarrassed. She 
made one or two short remarks, ending them 
abruptly, as if she wished to say something 
else, but did not dare. I resolved to help 
her 

" Have you known Mme, Koluchy long? " 
I asked. 

''For a short time, a year or two," she 
replied. "Have you, Mr Head?" 

u For more than ten years," I answered. 
I stooped a little lower and let my voice 
drop in her ear 

14 Mme, Koluchy is my greatest enemy/ 1 
I said. 

'* Oh, good heavens I 1 ' she erred. She half 
started to her feet, then controlled herself 
and sat down again. 




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" She is also my greatest enemy, she is my 
direst foe — she is a devil, not a woman," 
said the poor lady, bringing out her words 
with the most tense and passionate force. 
" Oh, may I, may I speak to you and alone ?" 
"If your confidence relates to Mme, 
Koluchy, I shall be only too glad to hear 
what you have got to say, 7 ' I replied. 

"They are coming back— I hear them," 
she said, "I will find an opportunity to- 
morrow. She must not know that I am 
taking you into my confidence." 

She left me, to talk eager ly, with flushed 
cheeks, and eyes bright with ill-suppressed 
terror, to a merry girl who had just come 
in from the billiard-room. 

The party soon afterwards broke up for 
the night, and I had no opportunity of saying 
a word to Dufrayer, who slept in a wing at 
the other end of the house. 

The next morning after breakfast Carlton 
took Dufrayer and myself down to see his 
strong room. The ingenuity and cleverness 
of the arrangement by which the electric 
bells were sounded the moment the key was 
put into the lock struck me with amazement. 
The safe was of the strongest pattern ; the 
levers and bolts, as well as the 
arrangement of the lock, making 
it practically impregnable. 

" Roden's safe resembles 
mine in every particular," said 
Carlton, as he turned the key 
in the lock and readjusted the 
different bolts in their respec- 
tive places. " You can see for 
yourselves that no one could 
rob such a safe without detec- 
tion," 

" It would certainly be black 
magic if he did," was my 
response. 

"We have arranged for a 
shooting party this morning," 
continued Carlton; * c let us 
forget diamonds and their 
attendant anxieties, and enjoy 
ourselves out of doors. The 
birds are plentiful, and I trust 
we shall have a good time." 
He took us upstairs, and we 
i started a few moments later on 
our expedition. 

It was arranged that the 
ladies should meet us for lunch 
at one of the keepers' cottages. 
We spent a thoroughly pleasant 
morning, the sport was good, 
and I had seldom enjoyed 

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HI" CASCAIH^ 



light may be shut off from any jet or any 
portion of the fountain. 

The accompanying illustration represents 
a design to which the inventor has given 
the fanciful name of the "Cascade." It 
wilt be noticed that nearly all the centre 
funnels are in use, and are so regulated as to 
makfc a fairly perfect arc in the sky. The 
so-called " Flaming Torches " shows that the 



mere abstention 
from using one or 
more of the funnels 
completely revolu- 
tionizes the design, 
and this constant 
variation in design 
is accentuated by 
the sometimes be- 
wildering altera- 
tions of colour. 

The illustration 
entitled "Ribbons 
of Light " shows 
how the magnifi- 
cent columns of 
water may be made 
to lean inward, 
over the funnels of 
light, and to play 
toward the central 
geyser. Each 
column is illumin- 
ated in different 
colours , and the whole, when skilfully handled, 
may be made to represent a maypole with its 
gay and whirling ribbons. 

The " Beehives at Night" is but a variation 
of the " Sheaves of Wheat " design , each bee- 
hive being but a sheaf of wheat with the top 
cut off* This diminution is caused, of course, 
by a lessening of pressure. 

Many cities are building electric fountains 




byCiC 



FLAMING TOUCH 



UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



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THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



is my early history. You must know it in 
order to understand what follows. When I 
was very young, not more than seventeen, I 
was married to an Italian of the name of 
Count Porcelli. My people were poor, and 
he was supposed to be rich. He was con- 
sidered a good match. He was a handsome 
man, but many years my Senior. Almost 
immediately after the marriage my mother 
died, and I had no near relations or friends 
in England. The Count took me to Naples, 
and I was not long there before I made some 
terrible discoveries. My husband was a 
leading member of a political secret society, 
whose name I never heard. I need not 
enter into particulars of that awful time. 
Suffice it to say that he subjected me to 
almost every cruelty. 

" In the autumn of 1893, while we were in 
Rome, Count Porcelli was stabbed one night in 
the Forum. He had parted from me in a fury 
at some trifling act of disobedience to his in- 
tolerable wishes, and I never saw him again, 
either alive or dead. His death was an immense 
relief to me. I returned home, and two 
years afterwards, in 1895. I married Mr. 
Carlton, and everything was bright and 
happy. A year after the marriage we had a 
little son. I have not shown you my boy, 
for he is away from home at present. He 
is the heir to my husband's extensive estates, 
and is a beautiful child. My husband 
was, and is, devotedly attached to me— 
indeed, he is the soul of honour, chivalry, 
and kindness. I began to forget those 
fearful days in Naples and Rome ; but, Mr. 
Head, a year ago everything changed. I 
went to see that fiend in human guise, Mme. 
Koluchy. You know she poses as a doctor. 
It was the fashion to consult her. I was 
suffering from a trifling malady, and my 
husband begged me to go to her. I went, 
and we quickly discovered that we both 
possessed ties, awful ties, to the dismal past. 
Mme. Koluchy knew my first husband, 
Count Porcelli, well. She told me that he 
was alive and in England, and that my 
marriage to Mr. Carlton was void. 

" You may imagine my agony. If this 
were indeed true, what was to become of my 
child, and what would Mr. Carlton's feelings 
be ? The shock was so tremendous that I 
became ill, and was almost delirious for a 
week. During that time Madame herself 
insisted on nursing me. She was outwardly 
kind, and told me that my sorrow was hers, 
and that she certainly would not betray me. 
But she said that Count Porcelli had heard 
of my marriage, and would not keep my 

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secret if I did not make it worth his while. 
From that moment the most awful black- 
mailing began. From time to time I had to 
part with large sums of money. Mr. Carlton 
is so rich and generous that he would give 
me anything without question. This state of 
things has gone on for a year. I have kept 
the awful danger at bay at the point of the 
sword." 

" But how can you tell that Count Porcelli 
is alive ? " I asked. " Remember that there 
are few more unscrupulous people than 
Mme. Koluchy. How do you know that 
this may not be a fabrication on her part in 
order to wring money from you ? " 

" I have not seen Count Porcelli," replied 
my companion ; " but all the same, the proof 
is incontestible, for Madame has brought me 
letters from him. He promises to leave me 
in peace if I will provide him with money ; 
but at the same time he assures me that he 
will declare himself at any moment if I fail 
to listen to his demands." 

"Nevertheless, my impression is," I 
replied, "that Count Porcelli is not in 
existence, and that Madame is playing a 
risky game ; but you have more to tell ? " 

'VI have. You have by no means heard 
the worst yet. My present difficulty is one 
to scare the stoutest heart. A month ago 
Madame came to our house in town, and 
sitting down opposite to me, made a 
most terrible proposal. She took ' a jewel- 
case from her pocket, and, touching a spring, 
revealed within the largest diamond that I 
had ever seen. She laid it in my hand — it 
was egg-shaped, and had an indentation at 
one end. While I was gazing at it, and 
admiring it, she suddenly told me that it 
was only an imitation. I stared at her in 
amazement. 

" * Now, listen attentively/ she said. c All 
your future depends on whether you have 
brains, wit, and tact for a great emergency. 
The stone you hold in your hand is an 
imitation, a perfect one. I had it made 
from my knowledge of the original. It 
would take in the greatest expert in the 
diamond market who did not apply tests to it 
The real stone is at the house of Monsieur 
Roden. You and your husband, I happen 
to know, are going to stay at the Rodens' 
place in the country to-morrow. The real 
stone, the great Rocheville diamond, was 
stolen from my house in Welbeck Street six 
weeks ago. It was purchased by Monsieur 
Roden from a Cingalese employed by the 
gang who stole it, at a very large figure, but 
also at only a third of its real value. For 
Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE SEVEN KINGS. 



13* 



reasons which I need not explain, I was 
unable to expose the burglary, and in con- 
sequence it was easy to get rid of the stone 
for a large sum— but those who think that I 
will tamely submit to such a gigantic loss 
little know me. I am determined that the 
stone shall once more come into my possession, 
either by fair means or foul. Now, you are 
the only person who can help me, for you 
will be unsuspected, and can work where I 
should not have a chance. It is to be your 
task to substitute the imitation for the real 
stone/ 

H ( How can 1 ? J I asked 

11 'Easily, if you will follow my guidance. 
When you are at the Rbdens', you must lead 
the conversation to the subject of diamonds, 
or rather you must get your husband to do 
so, for he would be even 
less suspected than you. 
He will ask Monsieur 
Roden to show you both 
his strong room where his 
valuable jewels are kept, 
You must make an excuse 
to be in the room a 
moment by yourself You 
must substitute the real 
for the unreal as quickly, 
as deftly as if you were 
possessed of legerdemain. 
Take your opportunity to 
do this as best you can — 
all I ask of you is to 
succeed — otherwise T — her 
eyes blazed into mine — 
they were brighter than 
diamonds themselves. 

" * Otherwise ? J I re- 
peated, faintly. 

M< Count Porcelli is close 
at hand — he shall claim 
his wife, 'flunk of Mr. 
Carlton's feelings, think of 
your son's doom.' She 
pa used ? raising her brows 
with a "gesture peculiarly 
her own* * I need not 
say anything further/ she 
added. 

41 Well, Mr. Head, I 
struggled against her awful proposal. At 
first I refused to have anything to do with 
it, but she piled on the agony, showing me 
only too plainly what my position would be 
did I not accede to her wishes- She traded 
on my weakness; on my passionate love for 
the child and for his father. Yes, in the end 
I yielded to hen 

Digitized by Google 



"The next day we went to the R6dens\ 
Despair rendered me cunning ; I introduced 
the subject of the jewels to my husband, and 
begged of him to ask Monsieur Roden to 
show us his safe and its contents. Monsieur 
Roden was only too glad to do so. It is one 
of his fads, and that fad is also shared by my 
husband, to keep his most valuable stones in 
a safe peculiarly constructed in the \ r aults of 
his own house. My husband has a similar 
strong room, We went into the.vaults, and 
Monsieur Roden allowed me to take the 
Roche ville diamond in my hand for a 
moment When I had it in my possession 
I stepped backward, made a clumsy move- 
ment by intention^ knocked against a chair, 
slipped, and the diamond fell from my fingers* 
I saw it flash and roll away, Quicker almost 




RODEN ALLOWED ME TO TAKE THE ROCHEVILLE DIAMOND IN MY HftNlX" 



than thought I put my foot on it, and before 
anyone could detect me had substituted the 
imitation for the real The real stone was in 
my pocket and the imitation in Monsieur 
Roden's case, without anyone being in the 
least the wiser, 

"With the great Rocheville diamond feel- 
ing heavier than lead in my pocket, I went 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



1^2 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



away the next morning with my husband. I 
had valuable jewels of my own, and have a 
jewel-case of unique pattern. It is kept in 
the strong room at the Castle. I obtained 
the key of the strong room from my husband, 
went down to the vaults, and under the 
pretence of putting some diamonds and 
sapphires away, locked up the Rocheville 
diamond in my own private jewel-case. It 
is impossible to steal it from there, owing to 
the peculiar construction of the lock of the 
case, which starts electric bells ringing the 
moment the key is put inside. Now listen, 
Mr. Head. Madame knows all about the 
strong room, for she has wormed its secrets 
from me. She knows that with all her clever- 
ness she cannot pick that lock. She has, there- 
fore, told me that unless I give her the Roche- 
ville diamond to-night she will expose me. 
She declares that no entreaties will turn her 
from her purpose. She is like adamant, she 
has no heart at all. Her sweetness and 
graciousness, her pretended sympathy, are 
all on the surface. It is useless appealing to 
anything in her but her avarice. Fear ! — 
she does not know the meaning of the word. 
Oh, what am I to do ? I will not let her 
have the diamond, but how mad I was ever 
to yield to her." 

I gazed at my companion for a few 
moments without speaking. The full mean- 
ing of her extraordinary story was at last 
made abundantly plain. The theft which 
had so completely puzzled Monsieur Roden 
was explained at last. What Carlton's feel- 
ings would be when he knew the truth, it was 
impossible to realize ; but know the truth he 
must, and as soon as possible. I was more 
than ever certain that Count Porcelli's death 
was a reality, and that Madame was black- 
mailing the unfortunate young wife for her 
own purposes. But although I believed that 
such was assuredly the case, and that Mrs. 
Carlton had no real cause to dread dishonour 
to herself and her child, I had no means of 
proving my own belief. The moment had 
come to act, and to act promptly. Mrs. 
Carlton was overcome by the most terrible 
nervous fear, and had already got herself into 
the gravest danger by her theft of the 
diamond. She looked at me intently, and at 
last said, in a whisper : — 

44 Whatever you may think of me, speak. 
I know you believe that I am one of the 
most guilty wretches in existence, but you 
can scarcely realize what my temptation has 
been." 

44 I sympathize with you, of course," I said 
then ; " but there is only one thing to be 

Digitized by Google 



done. Now, may I speak quite plainly? I 
believe that Count Porcelli is dead. Madame 
is quite clever enough to forge letters which 
you would believe to be bond-fide. Remember 
that I know this woman well. She possesses 
consummate genius, and never yet owned to 
a scruple of any sort. It is only too plain 
that she reaps an enormous advantage by 
playing on your fears. You can never put 
things right, therefore, until you confide in 
your husband. Remember how enormous 
the danger is to him. He will not leave a 
stone unturned to come face to face with the 
Count Madame will have to show her 
hand, and you will be saved. Will you take 
my advice : will you go to him immediately ? " 

" I dare not, I dare not." 

u Very well ; you have another thing to 
consider. Monsieur Roden is determined to 
recover the stolen diamond. The cleverest 
members of the detective force are working 
day and night in his behalf. They are quite 
clever enough to trace the theft to you. You 
will be forced to open your jewel-case in 
their presence — just think of your feelings. 
Yes, Mrs. Carlton, believe me I am right : 
your husband must know all, the diamond 
must be returned to its rightful owner 
immediately." 

She wrung her hands in agony. 

" I cannot tell my husband," she replied. 
" I will find out some other means of getting 
rid of the diamond — even Madame had 
better have it than this. Think of the wreck 
of my complete life, think of the dishonour 
to my child. Mr. Head, I know you are 
kind, and I know your advice is really wise, 
but I cannot act on it. Madame has faithfully 
sworn to me that when she gets the Roche- 
ville diamond she will leave the country for 
ever, and that I shall never hear of her 
again. Count Porcelli will accompany her." 

" Do you believe this ? " I asked. 

44 In this special case I am inclined to 
believe her. I know that Madame has 
grown very anxious of late, and I am sure 
she feels that she is in extreme danger — she 
has dropped hints to that effect. She must 
have been sure that her position was a most 
unstable one when she refused to communi- 
cate the burglary in Wei beck Street to the 
police. But, hark ! I hear footsteps. Who 
is coming ?" 

Mrs. Carlton bent forward and peered 
through the brushwood. 

44 1 possess the most deadly fear of that 

woman," she continued ; 44 even now she may 

be watching us— that headache may have 

been all a pretence. God knows what will 

Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE SEVEN KINGS, 



m 



become of me if she discovers that I have 
confided in you. Don't let it seem that we 
have been talking about anything special 
Go on with your shooting. We are getting 
too far away from the others." 

She had scarcely said the words before I 
saw in the distance Mme, Koluchy approach- 
ing. She was walking slowly, with that 
graceful motion which in- 
variably characterized her 
steps. Her eyes were fixed 
on the ground, her face 
looked thoughtful 

"What are we to do?' 1 
said Mrs. Carlton, 

" You have nothing to do 
at the present moment," I 
replied, (1 but to keep up 
your courage. As to what 
you are to do in the imme- 
diate future, I must see 
you again. What you have 
told me requires immediate 
action. I swear I will save 
you and get you out of this 
scrape at any cost" 

"Oh, how good you are," 
she answered ; " but do go 
on with your shooting, 
Madame can read anyone 
through, and my face bears 
signs of agitation." 

Just "at that moment a 
great cock pheasant came 
beating through the boughs 
overhead, I glanced at 
'Mrs. Carlton, noticed her 
extreme pallor* and then 
almost recklessly raised my 
gun and fired. This was 
the first time I had used the 
gun since luncheon* What 
was the matter? I had an 
instant, just one brief 
instant, to realize that there 
was something wrong — there 
was a deafening roar — a 
flash as if a thousand sparks came before 
my eyes — I reeled and fell, and a great 
darkness closed over me. 

Out of an oblivion that might have been 
eternity, a dawning sense of consciousness 
came to me. I opened my eyes. The face 
of Dufrayer was bending over me, 

*' Hush ! " he said, " keep quiet, Head, 
Doctor," he added> *' he has come to him- 
self at last.' 1 

A young man, with a bright, intelligent 

Digitized by G* 



face, approached my side, " Ah ! you feel 
better?" he said. "That is right, but you 
must keep quiet Drink this, 55 

He raised a glass to my lips. I drank 
thirstily. I noticed now that my left hand 
and arm were in a splint, bandaged to my 
side, 

" What can have happened?" I exclaimed. 




"t KAISKD MY liUN AS 15 FIHED. 



I had scarcely uttered the words before 
memory came back to me in a flash. 

" You have had a bad accident," said 
Dufrayer ; u your gun burst." 

" Burst ! " I cried " Impossible." 

" It is only too true ; you have had a 
marvellous escape of your life, and your left 
hand and arm are injured." 

** Dufrayer/' I said at once, and eagerly, 
" I must see you alone. Will you ask the 
doctor to leave us ? JJ 

"I will be within pall, Mr. Dufrayer" said 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



134 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



the medical man. He went into the ante- 
room. I was feverish, and I knew it, but my 
one effort was to keep full consciousness until 
I had spoken to Dufrayer. 

" I must get up at once," I cried. " I feel 
all right, only a little queer about the head, 
but that is nothing. Is my hand much 
damaged ? " 

" It is badly injured," replied Dufrayer. 

" But how could the gun have burst," I 
continued. "It was one of Riley's make, 
and worth seventy guineas." 

I had scarcely said the last words, before 
a hideous thought flashed across me. 
Dufrayer spoke instantly, answering my 
surmise. 

" I have examined your gun Carefully — 
at least, what was left of it," he said, " and 
there is not the slightest doubt that the 
explosion was not caused by an ordinary 
cartridge. The stock and barrels are blown 
to fragments. The marvel is that you were 
not killed on the spot." 

"It is easy to guess who has done the 
mischief," I replied. 

" At least one fact is abundantly clear," 
said Dufrayer, "your gun was tampered 
with, probably during the luncheon interval. 
I have been making inquiries, and believe 
that one of the beaters knows something, 
only I have not got him yet to confess. 
I have also made a close examination of the 
ground where you stood* and have picked up 
a small piece of the brasswork of a cartridge. 
Matters are so grave that I have wired to 
Tyler and Ford, and they will both be here 
in the morning. My impression is that we 
shall soon .have got sufficient evidence to 
arrest Madame. It goes without saying that 
this is her work. This is the second time 
she has tried to get rid of you ; and, happen 
what may, the thing must be stopped. But 
I must not worry you any further at present, 
for the shock you have sustained has been 
fearful." 

"Am I badly hurt?" I asked. 

II Fortunately you are only cut a little 
about the face, and your eyes have altogether 
escaped. Dynamite always expends its force 
downwards." 

" Are the other injuries grave ? " 
Dufrayer hesitated, then he said, slowly : — 
" You may as well know the truth. From 
what the doctor tells me, I fear you will never 
have the use of your left hand again." 

"Better that than the eyes," I answered. 
"Now, Dufrayer, I have just received some 
important information from Mrs. Carlton. 
It was told to me under a seal of the deepest 



by LiOOgle 



secrecy, and even now I must not tell you 
what she has confided to me without her 
permission. Would it be possible to get her 
to come to see me for a moment ? " 

" I am sure she will come, and gladly. 
She seems to be in a terrible state of nervous 
prostration. You know, she was on the 
scene when the accident happened. When 
I appeared I found her in a half-fainting 
condition, supported, of course, by Mme. 
Koluchy, whom she seemed to shrink from 
in the most unmistakable manner. Yes, I 
will send her to you, but I do not think the 
doctor will allow you to talk long." 

" Never mind about the doctor or anyone 
else," I replied ; "let me see Mrs. Garlton — 
there is not an instant to lose." 

Dufrayer saw by my manner that I was 
frightfully excited. He left the room at once, 
and in a few moments Mrs. Carlton came in. 
Even in the midst of my own pain I could 
not but remark with consternation the look 
of agony on her face. She was trembling so 
excessively that she could scarcely stand. 

" Will you do something for me ? " I said, 
in a whisper. I was getting rapidly weaker, 
and even my powers of speech were failing 
me. 

"Anything in my power," she said, 
"except " 

" But I want no exceptions," I said. " I 
have nearly lost my life. I am speaking to 
you now almost with the solemnity of a 
dying man. I want you to go straight to 
your husband and tell him all." 

"No, no, no!" She turned away. Her 
face was whiter than the white dress which 
she was wearing. 

" Then if you will not confide in him, tell 
all that you have just told me to my friend 
Dufrayer. He is a lawyer, well accustomed 
to hearing stories of distress and horror. He 
will advise you. Will you at least do that ? " 

" I cannot." Her voice was hoarse with 
emotion, then she said, in a whisper : — 

" I am more terrified than ever, for I can- 
not find the key of my jewel-case." 

" This makes matters still graver, although 
I believe that even Mme. Koluchy cannot 
tamper with the strong room. You will tell 
your husband or Dufrayer — promise me that, 
and I shall rest happy." 

" I cannot, Mr. Head ; and you, on your 
part, have promised not to reveal my secret." 

" You put me in a most cruel dilemma," 
I replied. 

Just then the doctor came into the room, 
accompanied by Carlton. 

" Come, come," said the medical man, 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE SEVEN KINGS. 



J 35 




tion. You look anything 
but fit yourself, old man," 
he continued. " You must 
go to sleep now. What- 
ever part Madame has 
played in this tragedy, she 
is keeping up appearances 
with her usual aplomb. 
There was not a more 
brilliant member of the 
dinner party to-night than 
she. She has been 
inquiring with apparent 
sympathy for you, and 
offered to come and see 
you if that would mend 
matters, Of course, I told 
her that the doctor would 
not allow any visitors. 
Now you must tale your 
sleeping draught, and trust 
for the best. I am follow- 
ing up the clue of the 



gun, 



and believe that it 



™ STRAIGHT TO YOUR HVSBAfcP ANP TRU- HlM ALL. 



4i Mr. Head, you are exciting yourself. I am 
afraid, Mrs. Carlton, I must ask you to leave 
my patient Absolute quiet is essential 
Fortunately the injuries to the face are trivial, 
but the shock to the system has been con- 
siderable, and fever may set in unless quiet 
is enforced." 

(l Come, Nora/ 1 said her husband ; " you 
ought to rest yourself, my dear, for you look 
very bad," 

As they were leaving the room 1 motioned 
Dufrayer to my side, 

" Go to Mrs, Carlton," I said ; " she has 
something to say of the utmost importance. 
Tell her that you know she possesses a 
secret, that I have not told you what it is, 
but that I have implored of her to take you 
into her confidence. 11 

" 1 will do so," he replied. 

I .ate that evening he came back to me. 

« Well ? " I cried, eagerly, 

u Mrs. Carlton is too ill to be pressed any 
further, Head; she has been obliged to go to 
her room, and the doctor has been with her. 
He prescribed a soothing draught. Her 
husband is very much puzzled at her condi- 



)gle 



only requires a little per- 
suasion to get some really 
important evidence from 
one of the beaters ; but 
more of this to-morrow. 
You must sleep now, 
Head, you must sleep," 

The shock 1 had under- 
gone, and the intense pain 
in my arm which began about this time to 
come on, told even upon my strong frame. 
Dufrayer poured out a sleeping draught 
which the doctor had sent round— I drank it 
off, and soon afterwards he left me. 

An hour or two passed ; at the end of that 
time the draught began to take effect, drowsi- 
ness stole over me, the pain grew less, and I 
fell into an uneasy sleep, broken with hideous 
and grotesque dreams. From one of these I 
awoke with a start, struck a match, and looked 
at my watch. It was half-past three. 
The house had of course long ago retired 
to rest, and everything was intensely 
still, I could hear in the distance the 
monotonous ticking of the great clock in the 
hall, but no other sound reached my ears. 
My feverish brain, however, was actively 
working. The phantasmagoria of my 
dream seemed to take life and shape. 
Fantastic forms seemed to hover round my 
bed, and faces sinister with evil appeared 
to me— each one bore a likeness to Mme. 
Koluchy, I became more and more 
feverish, and now a deadly fear that even at 
this moment something aivful was happening 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



*3 6 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



began to assail me. It rose to a conviction, 
Madame, with her almost superhuman 
knowledge, must guess that she was in 
danger. Surely, she would not allow the 
night to go by without acting ? Surely, 
while we were supposed to sleep, she would 
steal the Rocheville diamond, and escape? 

The horror of this thought was so over- 
powering that I could stay still no longer, I 
flung off the bed-clothes and sprang from the 
bed. A delirious excitement was consuming 
me. Putting on my dressing-go wn> I crept 
out on to the landing, then I silently went 
down the great staircase, crossed the hall, 
and, turning to the left, went down another 
passage to the door of the stone stairs lead- 
ing to the vault in which was Carlton's strong 
room. I had no sooner reached this door 
than my terrors and nervous fears became 
certainties. 

A gleam of light broke the darkness. I 
drew back into a recess in the stonework. 
Yes, I was right* My terrors and convictions 
of coming peril had not visited me without 
cause, for standing before the iron door of 
the strong room was Mme. Koluchy herself. 
There was a lighted taper in her hand. My 
bare feet had made no noise, and she was 
unaware of my presence. What was she 
doing? I waited in silence — my temples 
were hot and throbbing with overmaster- 
ing horror. I listened for the bells which 
would give the alarm directly she inserted 
the key in the iron door. She was doing 
something to the safe — I could tell this by 
the noise she was making — still no bells 
rang. 

The next instant the heavy door slipped 
back on its hinges, and Madame entered. 
The moment I saw this I could remain quiet 
no longer. I sprang forward, striking my 
wounded arm against something in the dark- 
ness. She turned and saw me — 1 made a 
frantic effort to seize her Lhcn my brain 
swam and ever}' atom of strength left me. I 
found myself falling upon something hard. 
I had entered the strong room. For a 
moment I lay on the floor half stunned, then 
I sprang to my feet, but I was too late. The 
iron door closed upon me with a muffled clang. 
Madame had by some miraculous means 
opened the safe without a key, had taken the 
diamond from Mrs, Carlton's jewel-case 
which stood open on a shelf, and had locked 
me a prisoner within. Half delirious and 
stunned, I had fallen an easy victim. I 
shouted loudly, but the closeness of my 
prison muffled and stifled my voice. 

How long I remained in captivity I cannot 

Digitized by G* 



tell. The pain in my arm, much increased 
by my sudden fall on the hard Jloor^ rendered 
me, I believe, partly delirious — I was feeling 
faint and chilled to the bone when the door 
of the strong room at last was opened, and 
Carlton and Dufrayer entered* I noticed 
immediately that there was daylight outside ; 
the night was over* 

"We have been looking for you every- 
where," said Dufrayer. "What in the name 
of fortune has happened ? How did you get 
in here ? Ji 

u In pursuit of Madame," I replied, " But 
where is she ? For Heaven's sake, tell me 
quickly," 

" Bolted, of course," answered Dufrayer, in 
a gloomy voice ; " but tell us what this means, 
Head, You shall hear what we have to say 
afterwards." 

I told my story in a few words. 

"But how, in the name of all that's 
wonderful, did she manage to open the safe 
without a key?" cried Carlton, "This is 
black art with a vengeance." 

" You must have left the strong room 
open," I said, 

" That I will swear I did not," he replied, 
" I locked the safe as usual, after showing it 
to. you and Dufrayer yesterday. Here is the 
key," 

" Let me see it," I said. 

He handed it to me. I took it over to 
the light, 

" Look here," I 
cried, with sudden 
excitement, " this 
cannot be your 
original key — it 
must have been 
changed. You 
think you locked 
the safe with this 
key, Carlton, you 
have been tricked 




SECTTON OF HAKIhhl < .NI- 



KE V, SHOWING 



It^TCHeTY . _ 

Original from 



THE KEY, 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE SEVEN KINGS. 



137 



by that arch-fiend Did you ever before see 
a key like this?" 

I held the wards between my finger and 
thumb, and turned the barrel from left to 
right. The barrel revolved in the wards in 
a ratchet concealed in the shoulder. 

*' You could unlork the safe with this key, 
but not lock it again," I exclaimed. "See 
here." 

I inserted the key in the keyhole as 
I spoke. It instantly started the bells 
ringing. 

"The barrel turns, but the wards which 
are buried in the keyhole do hot turn with 
it, and the resistance of the ratchet gives 
exactly the impression as if you were locking 
the safe. Thus, yesterday morning, you 
thought you locked the safe with this key, 
but in reality you left it open. No one but 
that woman could have conceived such a 
scheme. In some way she must have sub- 
stituted this for your 
fcey." 

" Well, come to 
your room now, 
Head," cried Du- 
f raver, "or Madame 
will have achieved 
the darling wish of 
her heart, and your 
life will be the 
forfeit." 

I accompanied 
Carlton upstairs, 
dressed, and pre- 
sently joined the 
rest of the house- 
hold in one of the 
s i tt i ng-roo 1 n s . T he 
utmost excitement 
was apparent on 
every face* Mrs. 
Carlton was stand- 
ing near an open 
window. There 



were traces of tears on her cheeks, and yet 
her eyes, to my astonishment, betokened 
both joy and relief. She beckoned me to 
her side. 

"Come out with me for a moment, Mr. 
Head." 

When we got into the open air she turned 
to me* 

" Dreadful as the loss of the diamond is," 
she exclaimed, " there are few happier women 
in England than I am at the present 
moment. My maid brought me a letter 
from Mme* Koluchy this morning, which has 
assuaged my worst fears. In it she owns 
that Count Porcelli has been long in his 
grave, and that she only blackmailed me in 
order to secure large sums of money." 

I was just about to reply to Mrs* Carlton 
when Dufrayer hurried up. 

u The detectives have arrived, and we 
w T ant you at once," he exclaimed. 

I accompanied 



r 




1 

1 



him into Carlton's 
study* Tyler and 
Ford were both 
present- They had 
just been examining 
the strong room, 
and had seen the 
false key. Their 
excitement was un- 
bounded. 

"She has bolted, 
but we will have 
her now," cried 
Ford. " We have 
got the evidence we 
want at last. It is 
true she has the 
start of us by three 
or four hours ; but 
at last— yes, at last 
— we can loose 
the hounds in full 
pursuit" 



" l"HI£KtL AH£ FEW HAfTir-H WOJklEN THAN 1 I." 



VvL *ri.-18 



by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



Underground London. 



[From Photos, by George jVakiws, Limited,] 




T is a time - honoured saying 
that, if you want to know any- 
thing about this great Me- 
tropolis of ours, you must not 
go to a Londoner in search of 
information. This is, no doubt t 
a trite remark, but the more one goes about, 
and the longer one lives, the more apparent 
becomes its truth. The foreigner intelligent 
or otherwise— who comes to London is very 
properly inquisitive; he questions, he inquires, 
he seeks for all that is curious or interesting, 
with the natural consequence that, after a very 
few weeks' residence, he can often give points 
to the man who has lived in the fi heart of the 
Empire " all his life. The average Londoner, on 
the contrary, is apt to take things very much 
for granted. He knows that, on the whole, 
matters affecting his safety and his health are 
well managed, and, such being the case, he 
does not bother 
his head much 
about the why and 
the wherefore. 
The vast organiza- 
tion, the capable 
administration, 
the host of details 
which have to be 
carefully thought 
out and rigorously 
applied— all these 
things are with the 
majority of people 
entirely overlook- 
ed. The end is 
good ; why bother 
about the means ? 
Thus is it that 
the average Lon- 
doner, and not 
least the travelled 
Londoner, while 
he waxes enthu- 
siastic over the 
wonders he has 
seen abroad- 
tells us about the 
admirable munici- 
pal arrangements 




A SUBWAV— SHOWING LARGE GAS -PIPE. 



which prevail in New York, and describes 
with animation the wonderful catacombs of 
Paris and Rome — remains in total ignorance 
of the fact that here, in our great City, he 
might feast his eyes upon wonders no less 
remarkable did he but know of their existence. 
But it is useless to dilate in this vein ; the 
Londoner will not be persuaded to go and 
see the wonders which lie at his very door 
Only through the medium of the ever- 
inquisitive journalist, always prying about 
in the dark places of the earth, does he some- 
times learn about and admire these native 
wonders, of the very existence of which he 
had not hitherto dreamed. 

I am bound to admit that^ so far as the 
nether world of the City was concerned, 
until a short time back I was not much better 
informed than the generality of my fellows. 
It is true I knew that there were such places 

as subways and 
sewers ; but that 
was about alL I 
had hardly the 
faintest concep- 
tion of what they 
were like, and 
probably should 
have continued to 
remain in ignor- 
ance had it not 
been for a visit 
I paid them a 
few months back. 
Quite by accident 
I came across the 
** Report of the 
Improvement 
Com m it tee of 
proceedings in 
connection with 
the Hoi born Val- 
1 e y Improve- 
ment," which was 
issued five- and - 
twenty years ago, 
and desultorily 
turning over its 
pages, I was 
struck by the 



by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



CURIOSITIES. 



*37 



A WONDERFUL MODEL MADE 
BY A BOY. 

Here we see a most ingenious 
model of a 6irL manual fire 
engine made by Master Chns. K 
Coalcs, aged thirteen and a half 
years. The prima was sent in 
by l he lad's father, who is cap- 
tain of l he Newport Pagnell 
Fire Brigade, and lives at 31 , 
High Street, in that town. The 
model was commenced when 
Master Coales was barely thir- 
teen. It is constructed accurately 
to scale, and when tested was 
found capable of pumping 
3 l 4 pints of water per minute, 
and throwing a jet of water a 
distance of several yards- The 
valves, cylinders, pistons, slings 
working beam, levers, rocking- 
shaft, branch pipe, etc, etc., are 



nit 1^ 

> HI 




CHICKENS IN THE ACT OF BEING 
HATCHED, 

Here is a photograph of one of the drawers 
of an incubator, with some of the eggs in the 
very act of being hatched. The eggs, seen in 
the foreground were put in later than those 
that have been hatched, and are not due until 
several days later. The incubator itself will 
hold sixty eggs. The photo., which is a snap- 
shot taken in a strong sunlight, was sent in by 
Mr. L, Gistleman Brown. It will l>e noticed, 
though with difficulty, owing to the writing 
being very faint hi Ihe original photograph, that 
a dale is inscribed on each of the eggs — April 
nth, April 14th, April 15th* etc. — showing 
when the individual chicks are due, 



all worked - up from the rough material The 
engine has a brass fore - carriage and a t>ody of 
polished mahogany. From a photo, by T homey- 
croft, Newport. 



LOOKING UP A GUN-BARREL 
Ingenious people who habitually use cameras 
frequently lire of taking landscapes and other com- 
paratively commonplace subjects, and therefore cast 
alxmt them for novelties. The photograph re- 
produced here is decidedly one of these, as it is an 
actual photograph taken with Ihe lens oF the camera 
looking through the interior of an ordinary 4m. 
breech -loading gun, and yon will notice that in the 
photograph the rifling is very distinctly seen. The 
photograph was taken and sent in by Mr. R. 
I. Hamlin , of H.x\l,S. ftfawtfcr, Greenhithe t 
Kent. ^— * 



by VjC 



IC 




UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



140 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



the Chief Clerk to 
the Commissioners, 
who, according to 
Ml Smallman, is 
virtually the u perma- 
nent chairman," The 
ph otogra pher, with 
his assistant and the 
writer, brought our 
little party up to eight 
all told When the 
gate opened at our 
summons, Mr. W. J. 
Liberty, the City 
Inspector of Sub- 
ways and — under the 
E ngi n eer — h ead of 
all practical matters 
appertaining to them, 
was waiting to show 
us over his territory. 
The iron gate, 
through which the 
sunlight was stream- 
ing, closed with a 
clang, and walking 
up two or three 
stairs, we set out along one of the thorough- 
fares of the underground city. 

In the first instance, I experienced a feeling 
of disappointment. The reality was so different 
from what I had expected My idea had 




A NARROW SUBWAY OVER THE L. C. AND D. KAT1.WAY. 



been that a subway 
would prove as Mr. 
M antalini might 
have said, a " dem- 
nition deuced damp" 
sort of a place, smell- 
ing of the earth, 
dark and filled with 
an atmosphere re- 
sembling that of a 
charnel-house. And 
what did I see? A 
long, clean, and well 
garnished looking 
passage, dimly illu- 
mined by gas -jets 
(which, by the way, 
we re s pedal ly pro- 
vided for our visit), 
and having an atmo- 
sphere almost as 
healthy as that we 
had just left. But 
the feeling of disap- 
pointment soon gave 
way to one of admi- 
ration when we 
walked along the subway, and the uses of the 
various pipes which ran along one side were 
pointed out to me* They include the mains 
of the Gas, New River, Hydraulic Power, 
and Electric Light Companies, also the 




by 



SUBWAY ukp&r p riscs CON&QKTS SjTA-rUR. 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



UNDERGROUND LONDON 



141 




L'KDtfK THE CHEAT Flftfi OF 1 3^7, SHOWING THE MAIK5 
WHICH SUPPLIED WATER TO THE FIRE ENf.IKES. 

pneumatic tubes and hundreds of wires 
belonging to the G.P.O. ; and the arrange- 
ments whereby the service mains are con- 
nected to the various houses show that 
simplicity which constitutes the high -water 
mark of mechanical ingenuity. The usual 
time for making the connection is half 
an hour, and in case of non-payment of 
rates, a house can 
be cut off from its 
gas, water, electric 
light, or power 
supply in a few 
minutes, and this, 
moreover , without 
the unfortunate 
tenant or the 
general public 
knowing anything 
about it, 

I was rather 
amused to notice 
that the names of 
the various streets 
under which we 
were passing were 
posted upon the 
walls, as were also 
the numbers of the 
houses served by 
the mains. Thus, 
in case of emer- 



gency or fire, all that has to be done is 
to cut off the service at the particular 
branch where the mischief has occurred. 
As we went along, the Superintendent 
explained to me the exceedingly ingenious 
manner in which the difficulties incidental 
to the construction of the subways had 
been surmounted, and also pointed out 
how they were ventilated and generally kept 
sweet and clean. But as this is not a technical 
article, I need not weary the reader with 
such details, interesting as they are to those 
with a knowledge of underground engineer- 
ing. Perhaps the most interesting subway 
of them all is the length on the southern 
side ■ of; Hoi born, between Farringdon 
Street and Shoe I^ane, which is lighted by 
gratings, filled with glass lenses, placed at 
intervals of 40ft, These render it suffi- 
ciently '► light by day for the purposes of 
inspection and work. The only daylight 
which gets into the others comes through 
the ventilating gratings in the footway, and 
this has to be supplemented by artificial 
light, It might be thought, in view 
of the possibility of leakage from the 
gas mains, that working in the subways 
might not be unattended by danger. The 
idea certainly struck me, and I speedily 
inquired of the Superintendent whether 
it was safe to smoke. His answer 
speedily reassured me* Every morning, 
before any work is done, a most complete 
inspection is made ; armed with " Davys," 
the Superintendent and some of his men 




\J* 



oogle 



,Y UKW5R THE BANlQffg ff^f fg m 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



240 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE, 




A COLLECTION OF ANTS' WINGS. 
The wings seen in the above photograph were shed 
by numbers of an Is flying into a drawing-room, where 
I hey lunl been attracted by the lighted lamp seen in 
the photograph* Many more wings were picked up 
from the path directly under an outside lamp. The 
ants themselves are flu and of a greyish while colour. 
Oddly enough, they are eagerly eaten by cats, toads, 
Jowls- -just before roosting — birds, Kaffirs, and some 
few Colonial I joys, who esteem them as a delicacy. 
One little Kaffir l>oy named Umfaan collected a 
milk tin full of these ants, which he promptly pro- 
ceeded to fry for his own refection. This curiosity 
was sent in by Mr. L. E. I^aurie, of Durliaii, Natal. 



THE MOST MARVELLOUS MAN IN THE WORLD. 
We here reproduce a photograph of M, dc Rouge* 
niont, who well deserves the above description. At 
an early age M. de Rougemont left his home in 
Switzerland to st^L his fortune in the French posses- 
sions in the Far East, but meeting with a Dutch 
pearler at Singapore he threw in his lot with him, and 
after the necessary negotiations were completed young 
Dc Rougemont set out on a pearling expedition in the 
South Seas. After about ten months* work a large 
fortune in pearls was amassed, but, owing to the fact 
that De Rougeinont discovered in one shell three 
black pearls of wondrous beauty, his partner, the 
Dutchman, insisted upon continuing the search, 
although the time was upon them when the monsoons 
were due to change. One day, when the Dutchman 
and his Malays had gone out pearling, De Rougemottt 
and a dog being left alone on hoard the schooner, a 
great storm arose, and the young Frenchman never 
again saw his comrades. For many days he navigated 
the ship single handed, but was at length cast upon a 
desert island -not a gorgeous, tropical place, but a 
tiny spit of sand measuring about 100yds. in length, 
ioyds. in width, and Sfi. above high w:iU:r mark. In 
this ghastly and appalling prison he spent two and a 
half years \ and the story of how he managed to keep 
his reason during these terrible months must be read 
to be adequately realized. Eventually M. de Rougc- 
rnont reached the mainland of Australia (X.N.YV. 
mast) in :i very remarkable manner, and from 
thai time commenced a series of adventures more 



weird, more horrible, more appalling, and 
more astounding than any ever conceived in 
the wildest flights of the novelist's imagination. 
For nearly thirty years M. de Rougemont was a 
cannibal chief, ruling his people with the 
wisdom of the serpent, and maintaining his 
authority over them in ways that are an astound- 
ing revelation of human ingenuity. It is not 
too much to say that the narrative of u The 
Adventures of Louis de Rougemont" will create 
a profound sensation throughout the civilized 
world, and we are happy to Lie able to state 
that the first long and thrilling instalment will 
appear in the current numl>er of 7^ Wide 
World Magazine * which is issued from these 
offices* It may interest readers of THE 
Strand to know that M, de Rougemont 
comes in daily to tell his story, which is taken 
down verbatim from his lips, and illustrated 
under his own direct supervision. The 
narrative, exaggerated as the statement may 
appear, is far more thrilling and remarkable 
than the two classics, " The Swiss Family 
Robinson" and ** Robinson Crusoe," and soon 
after these lines meet the eyes of our read res 
the whole of Great Britain and America 
will txr talking about this marvellous man. This 
story, by the way, has already been gone into by 
such eminent geographical experts as Dr. Scott Keltic 
and Dr* Hugh Robert Mill, who are perfectly satisfied 
as to its correctness, and have thoroughly checked it 
by means of charts, latest explorers' reports, etc., etc* 
The scientific side alone of M. de Rougemonl's 
narrative is considered by these exerts of such 
great importance that a paper is being prepared to 
be read at the Bristol Congress of the British Associa- 
tion for the Advancement of Science, which will be 
held in September. Readers of The STRAND 
Magazine would do well to order The Wide World 
Magazitit without a moment's delay. 



by ^OOgle 




UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



p rtnfJ f , Original from 

by VjUU^IC UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 




"WITH A HORRIBLE CRY, THE YOUNG MAN FELL SENSELESS AT OUR FEET/' 

{See page 249, ) 



by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



The Strand Magazine. 



Vol. xvi. 



SEPTEMBER, 1898. 



No. 93. 



Round the Fire. 

By A. Conan Doyle. 
IV.— THE STORY OF THE SEALED ROOM. 




SOLICITOR of an active 
habit and athletic tastes who 
is compelled by his hopes of 
business to remain within the 
four walls of his office ' from 
ten till five must take what 
exercise he can in the evenings. Hence it 
was that I was in the habit of indulging in 
very long nocturnal excursions, in which I 
sought the heights of Hampstead and High- 
gate in order to cleanse my system from the 
impure air of Abchurch Lane. It was in the 
course of one of these aimless rambles that 
I first met Felix Stanniford, and so led up to 
what has been the most extraordinary adven- 
ture of my lifetime. 

One evening — it was in April or early May 
of the year 1894 — I made my way to the 
extreme northern fringe of London, and was 
walking down one of those fine avenues of 
high brick villas which the huge city is for 
ever pushing farther and farther out into the 
country. It was a fine, clear spring night, 
the moon was shining out of an unclouded 
sky, and I, having already left many miles 
behind me, was inclined to walk slowly and 
to look about me. In this contemplative 
mood, my attention was arrested by one of 
the houses which I was passing. 

It was a very large building, standing in its 
own grounds, a little back from the road. It 
was modern in appearance, and yet it was far 
less so than its neighbours, all of which were 
crudely and painfully new. Their symmetrical 
line was broken by the gap caused by the 
laurel -studded lawn, with the great, dark, 
gloomy house looming at the back of it 
Evidently it had been the country retreat of 
some wealthy merchant, built perhaps when 
the nearest street was a mile off, and now 
gradually overtaken and surrounded by the 
red brick tentacles of the London octopus. 
The next stage, I reflected, would be its 
digestion and absorption, so that the cheap 
builder might rear a dozen eighty-pound-a- 
year villas upon the garden frontage. And 
then, as all this passed vaguely through my 

Vol. xvi.-31. Copyright, 1898, by G 



mind, an incident occurred which brought 
my thoughts into quite another channel. 

A four-wheeled cab, that opprobrium of 
London, was coming jolting, and creaking in 
one direction, while in the other there was a 
yellow glare from the lamp of a cyclist. They 
were the only moving objects in the whole 
long, moonlit road, and yet they, crashed into 
each other with that malignant accuracy 
which brings two ocean liners together in the 
broad waste of the Atlantic. It was the 
cyclist's fault. He tried to cross in front of 
the cab, miscalculated his distance, and was 
knocked sprawling by the horse's shoulder. 
He rose, snarling ; the cabman swore back at 
him, and then, realizing that his number had 
not yet been taken, lashed his horse and 
lumbered off. The cyclist caught at the 
handles of his prostrate machine, and then 
suddenly sat down with a groan. " Oh, 
Lord ! " he said. 

I ran across the road to his side. " Any 
harm done ? " I asked. 

"It's my ankle," said he. "Only a twist, 
I think ; but it's pretty painful. Just give 
me your hand, will you ? " 

He lay in the yellow circle of the cycle 
lamp, and I noted as I helped him to his 
feet that he was a gentlemanly young fellow, 
with a slight, dark moustache and large, brown 
eyes, sensitive and nervous in appearance, 
with indications of weak health upon his 
sunken cheeks. Work or worry had left 
its traces upon his thin, yellow face. He 
stood up when I pulled his hand, but he held 
one foot in the air, and he groaned as he 
moved it. 

" I can't put it to the ground," said he. 

" Where do you live ? " 

" Here ! " he nodded his head towards the 
big, dark house in the garden. u I was cutting 
across to the gate when that confounded cab 
ran into me. Could you help me so far ? " 

It was easily done. I put his cycle inside the 
gate, and then I supported him down the drive, 
and up the steps to the hall door. There 
was not a light anywhere, and the place was as 

corge Newnes, Lim^te-d. 

VERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



i4<3 



7\HE STRAND MAGAZINE, 



fitting subject for a great painter than this 
beam or light in a City sewer. 

On we went, our progress necessarily slow, 
fur the bottom was slip[>ery, and the stream 
ran swiftly past our Ic^s. My guide explained 
that when there was a heavy downpour of 
rain otltfiidft, the word was given, and the 
men all went up to the surface, for the rush 
of fiur&uv*water filled the main almost up to 
the roof t and the augmented stream came 
sweeping along with the rush and roar of a 
mountain torrent. " No/' he said, ll we don't 
have accidents ; we can't afford to. If a man 
once got caught in such a torrent, there'd be 
no saving him, unless the water happened to 
be lower at a junction, and he managed to 



One of the sewermen was requested to bend 
down ; upon his sturdy shoulders the appa- 
ratus was placed ; then we all waited patiently 
until the magnesium wire flashed out and 
made us all blink- Whether the picture 
was a success or not may be left to the 
reader to say. Possibly the subjects are not 
looking very well pleased, but when you are 
standing in a stream of running water, and 
can feel yourself perspiring profusely under a 
lot of unaccustomed garments ; while, more- 
over, the temperature is some twenty or 
thirty degrees higher than would be comfort- 
able, and your eyes are getting a little 
strained by the curious half-light, it is by no 
means the easiest of tasks to obey the photo- 




citot r or cvmuissio\*RS axp ju-rtn>K, ik THm old flejct sfw-ql 



regain his foothold, otherwise he'd be carried 
ftfopjt with the stream until it discharged itself 
in the river at Harking. That's where he'd 
\< kuind ; at leao, what was loft of him/* 

The water, .is 1 ha\ e suit was only from 
ift, to i Sin, dee|\ but after this little conver- 
sation 1 found m\Mlf takirg particular care 
as to how arvi uhere 1 put my feet down, 
iVwitiy the photographer ordered us to 
K\\x a:\i arrange outmI^k He warrcod to 
tale* gT\ns;\ Vhcrc a d ^ou::v awe: h:$ 
Mirera wm\\ rest «:xv; *:<* &x*X S*as mKre 
*av v so f ifc d a **:V;vn tor i:> Sa>h! ; ^ht 
A^uratos ? Happy tixx^h: a hu:r<jn >^r\j : 

Digitized by Google 



graphefs stereotyped command to Nook 
pleasant." 1 Our photographer, however, was 
a man of sense : he did not waste un- 
necessary time in giving us minute instruc- 
tions how to deport ourselves, but having 
once got us focused, " took us " without 
further advK 

After being pho;o£iaphe<L some of the 
party seemed d:s:nchned to go much farther. 
S<\ leaving them in the broad main, the 
SapmnterJ^n^ at my wisest *.vfc roe to 
*o:ne of the stde-ssrwts and b\ wits of the 
under £-v::rsi erty. As we *en^ I seizvd 
the opjxxr*i;::tr of <;-r«Jonir^ haw upon 
Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



UNDERGROUND LONDON 



*47 



his occupation. He seemed to think it was 
healthy enough. 

" Oh, yes, men get knocked up sometimes, 
but it's more often through catching colds 
than anything else. You see, it's hot down 
here, and if men loiter about up above, 
especially in the cold weather, they're likely 
to get chills. No, we don't often have men 
on the sick list with fevers or anything of 
that sort. Why should we? Its healthy 
enough down here : you yourself can testify 
that the smell is no worse than that you often 
encounter in the open street Now and 
again, of course, when at a bend or narrow 
passage, there's an accumulation of sewage, 
and the stream gets partially dammed, the 
men have a rather unpleasant job to perform ; 
bgt as a rule the work is not so objectionable 
as you would imagine. Yes, sometimes a 
man will stay down here for six or seven 
hours at a stretch, and they seem none the 
worse. Smoke ? Yes, as you see " (pointing 
to his pipe), " I smoke, and so do most of my 
men ; possibly, if we didn't, the smells which 
we sometimes meet with might affect us 
more." 

We entered one of the branches, and con- 
versation, except of the most limited descrip- 
tion, became impossible. The roof was so 
low that we had to bend almost double to 
avoid damaging ourselves ; added to this, it 
was constructed on a sharpish incline, and 
the bottom being slipper}', it was necessary 
to. proceed with caution. As my guide 
explained, had it been a wet day this branch 
would have been quite unnegotiable ; as it 
was, the water in it was only a few inches 
deep. This came from the surface, as I very 
soon saw,' for at the top end was one of the 
gulleys covered with an iron grating, to be 
seen in the roadway. 

Back we went as we had come ; past the 
place where the main stream forks out into 
two branches, in which the current, of course, 
flows more slowly. Along one of these we 
went, then up another branch even smaller 
than the first and more difficult, for here the 
water was almost knee-deep, and was swirl- 
ing and eddying like the river around the 
buttresses of one of the great bridges. 
Previously I had mentioned to my guide that 
if possible I should like to get a glimpse of 
some of the rats with which the sewers 
abound. He had explained that, though they 
came out more freely at night, he might 
manage to show me a few in one of the less- 



frequented portions of the sewers. And this 
was the place he had chosen. 

Painfully we made our way for some forty 
or fifty yards, and then, posting ourselves in 
a niche in the wall, we waited, but ne'er a 
rat did we see. Rather disappointed, we 
were just turning to go back, when I fancied 
I saw a dark shape flit past our feet. It may 
have been a rat or merely a shadow ; at all 
events, I started and nearly lost* my balance. 
With a clutch at my companion, I regained 
it ; then, as I stood upright, found we were 
in total darkness. As 1 slipped, my sconce 
fell from my hand, and was now being gaily 
borne eastward at the rate of two or three 
miles an hour, and, in grabbing at the Super- 
intendent, I had inadvertently extinguished 
his candle ; and we had not a match between 
us ! . The only thing to do was to grope 
our way back in the dark. Luckily, my 
companion could have found his way 
about blindfold, and consequently laughed 
heartily at our predicament. He led the way, 
and I followed, touching him lightly every 
few yards to make sure I was in his tracks, as 
the darkness was so intense that I could 
scarcely distinguish him. Now, I have a 
curious fact to relate. The Superintendent 
declares it was my imagination, but at the 
time I could have sworn that though never a rat 
made his appearance when, with candles lit, 
we stood on the look-out, they simply came 
out in shoals and rioted about our feet when 
we were journeying slowly and painfully in 
the dark. Well, it may have been imagina- 
tion, and perhaps the journey in the dark had 
played upon my nerves more than I cared to 
own. 

When we rejoined the rest of the party, 
they were all waiting and wondering what 
had become of us. They laughed heartily 
when we told our story, and frankly expressed 
their incredulity when I spoke about the rats. 
But they expressed no inclination to go and 
find out for themselves. 

And so back we all went to the shaft, and 
one by one climbed our way to the surface. 
And how glad were we to get there ! It was 
an exceedingly interesting experience, and one 
that it falls to the lot of few to have, and that 
I think all of us fully recognised. But after 
a couple of hours in the nether world, it 
was doubly delightful to feel the fresh breeze 
blowing on our cheeks, to hear the busy hum 
and clatter of the traffic, and to see once 
again the glorious blue sky over our heads. 



by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



1 



246 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



that you may feel. You must know that my 
father was Stanislaus Stanniford, the banker." 

Stan ni ford, the banker ! I remembered 
the name at once, His flight from the 
country some seven years before had been 
one of the scandals and sensations of the 
time. 

" I see that you remember," said my 
companion, " My poor father left the 
country to avoid numerous friends, whose 
savings he had invested in an unsuccessful 
speculation. He was a nervous, sensitive 



" The letter came from Paris, but no 
address was given. It was when my poor 
mother died. He wrote to me then, with 
some instructions and some advice, and I 
have never heard from him since," 

" Had you heard before ? " 

" Oh t yes, we had heard before, and that's 
where our mystery of the sealed door, upon 
which you stumbled to-night, has its origin. 
Pass me that desk, if you please. Here I 
have my father's letters, and you are the first 
man except Mr. Perceval who has seen them," 




HfcKE I HAVE HV FATHtkS [.UTTKfcs/ 



man, and the responsibility quite upset 
his reason. He had committed no legal 
offence. It was purely a matter of sentiment 
He would not even face his own family, and 
he died among strangers without ever letting 
us know where he was." 

11 He died V" said I. 

** We could not prove his death, but we 
know that it must be so, because the specula- 
tions came right again, and so there was no 
reason why he should not look any man in 
the face. He would have returned if he 
were alive. But he must have died in the 
last two years." 

kl Why in the last two years?" 

" Because we heard from him two years 
ago." 

" Did hu not tell you then where he was 
living?" 

Digitized by Google 



" Who is Mr. Perceval, may 1 ask ? " 
"He was my father's confidential clerk, 
and he has continued to be the friend and 
adviser of my mother and then of myself. 
I don't know what we should have done 
without Perceval He saw the letters, but 
no one else. This is the first one, which 
came on the very day when my father fled, 
seven years ago. Read it to yourself." 
This is the letter which I read : — 
"My Ever Dearest Wife, — Since Sir 
William told me how weak your heart is, and 
how harmful any shock might be, I have 
never talked about my business affairs to you, 
The time has come when at all risks I can no 
longer refrain from telling you that things 
have been going badly with me. This will 
cause me to leave you for a little time, but it 
is with the absolute assurance that we shall 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



ROUND THE FIRE. 



247 



see each other very soon. On this you can 
thoroughly rely. Our parting is only for a 
very short time, my own darling, so don't 
let it fret you, and above all don't let it impair 
your health, for that is what I want above all 
things to avoid. 

" Now, I have a request to make, and I 
implore you by all that binds us together to 
fulfil it exactly as I tell you. There are 
some things which I do not wish to be seen 
by anyone in my dark room — the room 
which I use for photographic purposes at the 
end of the garden passage. To prevent any 
painful thoughts, I may assure you once for 
all, dear, that it is nothing of which I need 
be ashamed. But still I do not wish you or 
Felix to enter that room. It is locked, and 
I implore you when you receive .this to at 
once place a seal over the lock, and leave it 
so. Do not sell or let the house, for in 
either case my secret will be discovered. As 
long as you or Felix are in the house, I know 
that you will comply with my wishes. When 
Felix is twenty-one he may enter the room — 
not before. 

" And now, good-bye, my own best of 
wives. During our short separation you can 
consult Mr, Perceval on any matters which ' 
may arise. He has my complete confidence. 
I hate to leave Felix and you— even for a 
time — but there is really no choice. 

" Ever and always your loving husband, 
"Stanislaus Stanniford. 

"June 4th, 1887." 

" These are very private family matters for 
me to inflict upon you," said my companion, 
apologetically. " You must look upon it as 
done in your professional capacity. I have 
wanted to speak about it for years." 

" I am honoured by your confidence," I 
answered, "and exceedingly interested by 
the facts." 

" My father was a man who was noted for 
his almost morbid love of truth. He was 
always pedantically accurate. When he said, 
therefore, that he hoped to see my mother 
very soon, and when he said that he had 
nothing to be ashamed of in that dark room, 
you may rely upon it that he meant it." 

"Then what can it be? " I ejaculated. 

" Neither my mother nor I could imagine. 
We carried out his wishes to the letter, and 
placed the seal upon the door ; there it has 
been ever since. My mother lived for 
five years after my father's disappearance, 
although at the time all the doctors said that 
she could not survive long. Her heart was 
terribly diseased. During the first few 
months she had two letters from my father. 

Digitized by G< 



Both had the Paris post-mark, but no address. 
They were short, and to the same effect : 
that they would soon be re-united, and that 
she should not fret. Then there was a 
silence, which lasted until her death; and 
then came a letter to me of so private a 
nature that I cannot show it to you, begging 
me never to think evil of him, giving 
me much good advice, and saying that 
the sealing of the room was of less im- 
portance now than during the lifetime of 
my mother, but that the opening might still 
cause pain to others, and that, therefore, he 
thought it best that it should be postponed 
until my twenty-first year, for the lapse of 
time would make things easier. In the 
meantime, he committed the care of the 
room to me ; so now you can understand 
how it is that, although I am a very poor 
man, I can neither let nor sell this great 
house." 

" You could mortgage it." 

" My father had already done so." 

" It is a most singular state of affairs." 

" My mother and I were gradually com- 
pelled to sell the furniture and to dismiss the 
servants, until now, as you see, I am living 
: unattended in a single room. But I have 
only two more months." 

" What do you mean ? " 
- i " Why, that in two months I come of age. 
The first thing that I do will be to open that 
door ; the second, to get rid of the house." 

" VVhy should your father have continued 
to stay away when these investments had re- 
covered themselves ? " 

" He must be dead." 

"You say that he had not committed any 
legal offence when he fled the country ? " 

"None." 

"Why should he not take your mother 
with him ? " 

" I do not know." 

" Why should he conceal his address ? " 

" I do not know." 

" Why should he allow your mother to die 
and be buried without coming back ? " 

" I do not know." 

" My dear sir," said I, " if I may speak 
with the frankness of a professional adviser, 
I should say that it is very clear that your 
father had the strongest reasons for keeping 
out of the country, and that, if nothing has 
been proved against him, he at least 
thought that something might be, and 
refused to put himself within the power 
of the law. Surely that must be obvious, 
for in what other possible way can the 
facts be explained ? " 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



248 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



My companion did not take my suggestion 
in good part, 

" You had not the advantage of knowing 
my father, Mr, Alder," he said> coldly. "I 
was only a boy when he left us, but I shall 
always look upon him as my ideal man. His 
only fault was that he was too sensitive and 
too unselfish. That anyone should lose 
money through him would cut him to the 
heart. His sense of honour was most acute, 
and any theory of his disappearance which 
conflicts with that is a mistaken one/' 

It pleased me to hear the lad speak out so 
roundly, and yet I knew that the facts were 
against him, and that he was incapable of 
taking an unprejudiced view of the situation* 

*' I only speak as an outsider/' said I. 
a And now I must leave you. fnr I have a 
long walk before me. Your story has 
interested me so much that I should be glad 
if you could let 
me know the 
sequel." 

11 Leave me 
your card,' J said 
he ; and so, hav- 
ing bade him 
"good -night/' I 
left him. 

1 heard nothing 
more of the 
matter for some 
time, and had 
almost feared that 
it would prove to 
be one of those 
fleeting experi- 
ences which drift 
away from our 
direct observa- 
tion and end only 
in a hope or a 
suspicion. One 
afternoon, how- 
ever, a card bear- 
ing the name of 
Mr. j. H. Per- 
ceval was brought 
up to my office in 
Abchurch Lane, 
and its bearer, a 
small, dry, bright- 
eyed fellow of fifty, was ushered in by the 
clerk. 

"I believe, sir," said he, "that my name 
has been mentioned to you by my young 
friend, Mr. Felix Stanniford?" 

"Of course," I answered, "I remember" 

" He spoke to you, I understand, about 




t#W 



I B KM EVE, P1R, SAID ItB, 



by GoOgJC 



the circumstances in connection with the dis- 
appearance of my former employer, Mr. 
Stanislaus Stanniford, and the existence of a 
sealed room in his former residence." 
u He did* 

*' And you expressed an interest in the 
matter." 

'* It interested me extremely." 
" You are aware that we hold Mr. Stanni- 
ford ! s permission to open the room on the 
twenty-first birthday of his son ? " 
" I remember." 

"The twenty-first birthday is to-day." 
u Have you opened it ? " I asked, 
eagerly. 

" Not yet, sir," said he, gravely. *' I have 
reason to believe that it would be well to 
have witnesses present when that door is 
opened, You are a lawyer, and you are 
acquainted with the facts. Will you be pre- 
sent on the oc- 
casion ? " 

"Most cer- 
tainly," 

w You are em- 
ployed during the 
day, and so am L 
Shall we meet at 
nine o'clock at 
the house ? " 

H I will come, 
with pleasure." 

"Then you will 
find us waiting 
for you. Good- 
bye, for the pre- 
, sent." He bowed 
solemnly, and 
took his leave, 

I kept my ap- 
pointment that 
evening, with a 
brain which was 
weary with fruit- 
less attempts to 
think out some 
plausible explana- 
tion of the 
mystery which 
we were about to 
solve, Mr. Per- 
ceval and my 
young acquaintance were waiting for me 
in the little room, I was not surprised 
to see the young man looking pale and 
nervous, but I was rather astonished to 
find the dry little City man in a state of 
intense, though partially suppressed* excite- 
ment His cheeks were flushed, his hands 
Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



J TKAT MY NAME HAS BEEN 

Tt> voir?'* 



FOUND IJV UNCLE SAM'S MAILS. 



151 



dently mailed in war times, from 
the uniforms which all wear. 
Once in a while one of these is 
identified by some visitor, but 
most of them will for ever remain 
unknown. One's sympathies are 
touched when it is remembered 
that in most cases these were 
probably the last memento of 
some loved and lost one* 

Chinese cash, eggs t dogs, a 
buck -saw, a box of geological 
specimens, a lemon - squeezer, 
candle - snuffers, boot - trees of 
various sizes, Chinese junk, fans, 
hair flowers, stuffed birds, horned 
toads from California, hand mirrors, birds' 
nests, Indian canoes, a miniature skeleton 
(shown in the accompanying illustration), a 
toy gondola {seen below), shells, watches, 
cheap jewellery of all sorts, a set of false 




MINIATURE SKELETON. 



addresses, and a set of account- 
books kept by Benjamin Franklin 
when he was Deputy Postmaster- 
General for the Colonies in 1753, 
the accounts of which are kept 
in jQ s. d. 

In spite of the fact that all 
notices sent ask for minute 
details as to time of mailing and 
careful description for identifica- 
tion, it is not one time in a 
hundred that they are given, A 
case occurred a few years ago 
when a resident of a western city 
applied for a missing set of false 
teeth. As he did not furnish 
the required details, there were sent to the 
post-master at his office several sets of teeth, 
which had been found about the time men- 
tioned in his application. 

They were all returned to this office, 




A fllVL WATCHES LOST 1 K THE MAtl.S. 



teeth, door plates, valentines, painted fungi, 
toys, jewelled daggers, and a letter indorsed : 
"if not delivered in thirty years, return to 
the Farallone Island." 

The illustration in the middle of this page 
shows four shelves, two of which are filled 
with all sorts and conditions of watches — 
some of them old-time cumbersome Li tur- 
nips," others of fine gold, ornamented with 
costly gems, Every watch is tagged, await- 
ing ownership, but the unfortunate 
time-pieces will probably remain on 
those lonesome shelves, marking time 
till the Day of Judgment 

There are collections of coins ex- 
tracted from the mails and framed 
specimens of envelopes with u blind" 



accompanied by an indignant communication 
from the complainant, stating that the teeth 
sent him were "just common Texas store 
teeth, and could not by any possibility belong 
to so refined a mouth as mine." 

Again, people sometimes get very im- 
patient at what they consider the unnecessary 
delay of the postal officials. The following 
is a case in point, A few years ago a parcel 
of infant's clothing addressed to a woman 




MINIA/IURE VENETfAPJ GONJXJLA* 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



*5* 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



missionary in Africa was detained for want 
of proper postage. In reply to the notice 
sent her the woman very angrily wrote as 
follows : "The child for whom the garments 
were intended has not yet been eaten by the 
cannibals, but it has quite outgrown the 
clothing, and it may be returned to the sender 
whose address I inclose*" 

One shelf, as may be seen in the accom- 
panying illustration, is given over to dolls of 



sealed packages are seized annually in the 
New York Post-office. In an average year, 
according to one authority, 25,000 unsealed 
parcels are confiscated at the same office, 
and released on the payment of fines which 
are equivalent to the duties. Some very 
ingenious methods are employed for trans- 
mitting dutiable articles by post. Not long 
ago a package from Germany was found 
to contain a small roll of butter. A wire 




DOLLS, LACK, MA&ON1C AFttON, BELLOWS, AMI OTHER OBJECTS IN THE MUSEUM. 



different varieties, for whom the would-be 
recipients are probably still mourning, The 
same illustration also shows a Masonic apron, 
lace, bellows, a steel trap, and various other 
objects, the study of which will doubtless 
cause a broad smile- One is made and 
dressed entirely of corn-husks, with red hair 
made of the corn silk. There are also in 
the museum bricks, and old umbrellas that 
would have been a joy to Sairey Gamp ; new- 
fangled coffee-pots, lamp shades galore, a 
baby's boot-tree, and a Gargantuan cigar a 
foot long. 

The inspectors keep a sharp look-out for 
smuggling through the mails. About ^50 



by Google 



passed through it met with an obstruction;, 
which proved to be a tin box filled with 
valuable jewellery* Probably a dozen silk 
handkerchiefs are found wrapped up in 
newspapers in every mail from China, The 
skill exhibited by the postal clerks in detect- 
ing such contraband inclosufes is wonderful. 
Silk stockings are mailed from France 
in the same manner. An odd kind of 
smuggling is the sending of mushrooms 
by mail from Italy* They are of a 
peculiar kind, dried, and are much 
relished by the natives of that country 
in the United States. They come in small 
bags, and arc easily distinguished by smell 
Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



Round the Fire. 



By A. Conan Doyle. 
IIL— THE STORY OF THE LOST SPECIAL. 




HE confession of Herbert de 
Lernac, now lying under sen- 
tence of death at Marseilles, 
has thrown a light upon one 
of the most inexplicable crimes 
o( the century — an incident 
which is, I believe, absolutely unprecedented 
in the criminal annals of any country. 
Although there is a reluctance to discuss the 
matter in official circles, and little informa- 
tion has been given to the Press, there are 
still indications that the statement of this 
arch-crinnnal is corroborated by the facts, 
and that we have at last found a 
solution for a most astounding 
business. As the matter is eight 
years old, and as its importance 
was somewhat obscured by a 
political crisis which was engaging 
the public attention at the time, it 
may be as well to state the facts 
as far as we have been able to 
ascertain them. They are collated 
from the Liverpool papers of thai 
date, from the proceedings at the 
inquest upon John Slater, the 
engine-driver, and from the records 
of the London and West Coast 
Railway Company, which have been 
courteously put at my disposal, 
Briefly, they are as follows. 

On the 3rd of June, 1890, a 
gentleman, who gave his name as 
Monsieur Louis Caratal, desired an 
interview with Mr. James Bland, 
the superintendent of the Central 
London and West Coast Station in 
Liverpool. He was a small man, 
middle - aged and dark, with a 
stoop which was so marked that it 
suggested some deformity of the 
spine. He was accompanied by a 
friend, a man of imposing physique, 
whose deferential manner and con- 
stant attention suggested that his 
position was one of dependence. This friend 
or companion, w T hose name did not transpire, 
was certainly a foreigner, and probably, from 
his swarthy complexion, either a Spaniard or 
a South American. One peculiarity was 
observed in him. He carried in his left hand 
a small black leather despatch-box, and it was 
noticed by a sharp-eyed clerk in the Central 
office that this box was- fastened to his wrist 
Vol *vL— ao. 



by a strap. No importance was attached to 
the fact at the time, but subsequent events 
endowed it with some significance. Monsieur 
Caratal was shown up to Mr. Bland's office, 
while his companion remained outside. 

Monsieur CarataFs business was quickly 
dispatched. He had arrived that afternoon 
from Central America, Affairs of the utmost 
importance demanded that he should be in 
Paris without the loss of an unnecessary 
hour. He had missed the London express, 
A special must be provided. Money was of 
no importance. Time was everything. If 




MONSIEUR LOUIS CANATAL AND HI5 FRIEND, 



the company would 
speed him on his 
way, they might 
make their own 
terms. 

Mr. Bland struck 
the electric bell, 
summoned Mr, 
Potter Hood, the 



.Wglfe 



traffic manager, and had the matter arranged 
in five minutes. The train w r ould start in 
three-quarters of an hour* It would take that 
time to insure that the line should be clear, 
The powerful engine called Rochdale (No, 247 
on the company's register) was attached to two 
carriages, with a guard's van behind. The 
first carriage was solely for the purpose of 
-decreasing the inconvenience - arising from 

by George Newnes, LinSpfc) j fl 3 1 frOITl 

YERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



154 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



the oscillation. The second was divided, as 
usual, into four compartments, a first-class t 
a first-class smoking, a second-class, and a 
second-class smoking* The first compart- 
ment, which was the nearest to the engine, 
was the one allotted to the travellers. The 
other three were empty. The guard of the 
special train was James McPherson, who had 
been some years in the service of the com- 
pany. The stoker, William Smith, was a 
new hand. 

Monsieur Ca ratal, upon leaving the super- 
intendent's office, rejoined his companion, 
and both of them manifested 
extreme impatience to be off. 
Having paid the money asked, 
which amounted to fifty pounds 
five shillings, at the usual 
special rate of five shillings a 
mile, they demanded to be 
shown the carriage, and at 
once took their seats in it, 
although they were assured 
that the better part of an hour 
must elapse before the line 
could be cleared. In the 
meantime a singular coin- 
cidence had occurred in the 
office which Monsieur Caratal 
had just quitted. 

A request for a special is 
not a very uncommon circum- 
stance in a rich commercial 
centre, but that two should be 
required upon the same after- 
noon was most unusual It so 
happened, however, that Mr. 
Bland had hardly dismissed 
the first traveller before a 
second entered with a similar 
request. This was a Mr, 
Horace Moore, a gentlemanly 
man of military appearance, 
who alleged that the sudden 
serious illness of his wife in 
London made it absolutely 
imperative that he should not lose an 
instant in starting upon the journey. His 
distress and anxiety w*ere so evident that 
Mr + Bland did all that was possible to meet 
his wishes. A second special w T as out of the 
question, as the ordinary local service was 
already somewhat deranged by the first. 
There was the alternative, however, that Mr. 
Moore should share the expense of Monsieur 
CarataFs train, and should travel in the other 
empty first-class compartment, if Monsieur 
Caratal objected to having him in the one 
which he occupied. It was difficult to see any 




MH, HORACE MOO PP., 



by Google 



objection to such an arrangement, and yet 
Monsieur Caratal, upon the suggestion being 
made to him by Mr. Potter Hood, abso- 
lutely refused to consider it for an instant, 
The train was his, he said, and he would 
insist upon the exclusive use of it All argu- 
ment failed to overcome his ungracious 
objections, and finally the plan had to be 
abandoned Mr. Horace Moore left the 
station in great distress, after learning that 
his only course was to take the ordinary slow 
train which leaves Liverpool at six o'clock. 
At four thirty-one exactly by the station clock 
the special train, containing 
the crippled Monsieur Caratal 
and his gigantic companion, 
steamed out of the Liverpool 
station. The line was at that 
time clear, and there should 
have been no stoppage before 
Manchester. 

The trains of the London 
and West Coast Railway run 
over the lines of another com- 
pany as far as this town, which 
should have been reached by 
the special rather before six 
o'clock. At a quarter after six 
considerable surprise and some 
consternation were caused 
amongst the officials at Liver- 
pool by the receipt of a tele- 
gram from Manchester to say 
that it had not yet arrived. 
An inquiry directed to St. 
Helens, which is a third 
of the way between the two 
cities* elicited the following 
reply : — 

"To James Bland, Superin- 
tendent, Central L. & W. C, 
Liverpool — Special passed 
here at 4.52, well up to time, 
— Dowser, Sl Helens/* 

This telegram was received 
at 6,40. At 6.50 a second 
message was received from Manchester : — 
" No sign of special as advised by you/* 
And then ten minutes later a third, more 
bewildering : — 

" Presume some mistake as to proposed 
running of special. Ix>cal train from St. 
Helens timed to follow it has just arrived 
and has seen nothing of it Kindly wire 
advices. — Manchester," 

The matter was assuming a most amazing 

aspect, although in some respects the last 

telegram was a relief to the authorities at 

Liverpool. If an accident had occurred to 

Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



ROUND THE fWE. 



^55 



the sj>ecial j it seemed hardly possible that the 
local train could have passed down the same 
line without observing it. And yet, what was 
the alternative ? Where could the train be? 
Had it possibly been side-tracked for some 
reason in order to allow the slower train 
to go past ? Such an explanation was 
possible if some small repair had to be 
effected. A telegram was dispatched to 
each of the stations between St, Helens and 
Manchester, and the superintendent and 
traffic manager waited in the utmost suspense 
at the instrument for the series of replies 
which would enable them to say for certain 
what had become of the missing train. The 
answers came back in the order of questions, 
which was the order of the stations beginning 
at the St. Helens end : — 

11 Special passed here five o'clock, 
— Collins Green." 

"Special passed here six past five. 
— Earlestown." 

"Special passed here 5.10. — 
Newton." 

"Special passed here 5,20,— 
Kenyon Junction," 

'" No special train has passed 
here. — Barton Moss." 

The two officials stared at each 
other in amazement. 

"This is unique in my thirty years 
of experience," said Mr. Bland. 

u Absolutely unprecedented and 
inexplicable, sir. The special has 
gone wrong between Kenyon Junction and 
Barton Moss- 11 * 

"And yet there is no siding, as far as my 
memory serves me, between the two stations. 
The special must have run off the metals. " 

" But how could the four-fifty parliamentary 
pass over the same line without observing it ? w 

"There's no alternative, Mr, Hood. It 
must be so. Possibly the local train may 
have observed something which may throw 
some light upon the matter. We will wire 
to Manchester for more information, and to 
Kenyon Junction with instructions that the 
line be examined instantly as far as Barton 
Moss." 

The answer from Manchester came within 
a few minutes. 

" No news of missing special. Driver and 
guard of slow train positive that no accident 
lietween Kenyon Junction and Barton Moss. 
Line quite clear, and no sign of anything 
unusual — Manchester." 

" That driver and guard will have to go," 
said Mr, Bland, grimly. "There has been a 
wreck and they have missed it. The special 

Digitized by G* 



has obviously run off the metals without 
disturbing the line — how it could have done 
so passes my comprehension — but so it must 
be, and we shall have a wire from Kenyon 
or Barton Moss presently to say that they 
have found her at the bottom of an embank- 
ment/' 

But Mr. Bland's pruphcry was not destine ' 
to be fulfilled. A half-hour passed, and then 
there arrived the following message from the 
station-master of Kenyon Junction : — 

" There are no traces of the missing special. 
It is quite certain that she passed here, and 
that she did not arrive at Barton Moss. We 
have detached engine from goods train, and I 
have myself ridden down the line, but all is 
clear, and there is no sign of any accident" 




Mr. Bland 
tore his hair 
in his p e r- 
plexity, 

"This is 
rank lunacy, 
Hood I " he 
cried. "Does 
a train vanish 
into thin air in 
England in 
broad day- 
light ? The 
thing is pre- 
posterous. An 
engine, a 
tender, two carriages, a van, five human 
beings -and all lost on a straight line of 
railway ! Unless we get something positive 
within the next hour I'll take Inspector 
Collins, and go down myself/' 

And then at last something positive did 
occur. It took the shape of another telegram 
from Kenyon Junction, 

u Regret to report that the dead body of 
Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



'THE TWO OFFICIALS STAWFU 
EACH OTHEJt IN AMAZEMENT 



i56 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



John Slater, driver of the special train, has 
just been found among the gorse bushes at a 
point two and a quarter miles from the 
Junction. Had fallen from his engine, pitched 
down the embankment, and rolled among 
bushei5. Injuries to his head, from the fall, 
appear to be cause of death. Ground has 
now been carefully examined, and there is no 
trace of the missing train." 

The country was, as has already been 
stated, in the throes of a political crisis, and 
the attention of the public was further dis- 
tracted by the important and sensational 
developments in Paris, where a huge scandal 
threatened to destroy the Government and 
to wreck the reputations of many of the 
leading men in France* The papers were 
full of these events, and the singular dis- 
appearance of the special train attracted less 
attention than would have been the case in 
more peaceful times. The grotesque nature 
of the event helped to detract from its 
importance, for 
the papers were 
disinclined to 
believe the facts 
as reported to 
them. More 
than one of the 
London journals 
treated the matter 
as an ingenious 
hoax, until the 
coroner's inquest 
upon the unfor- 
tunate driver (an 
inquest which 
elicited nothing 
of importance) 
convinced them 
of the tragedy of 
the incident, 

Mr. Bland, ac- 
companied by In- 
spector Collins, 
the senior detec- 
tive officer in the 
service of the 
company, went 

down to Kenyon „ MK . m A+N[J AKU 1NSPBCTI 
Junction the 

same evening, and their research lasted 
throughout the following day, but was 
attended with purely negative results, Not 
only was no trace found of the missing train, 
but no conjecture could be put forward which 
could possibly explain the facts, At the 
same time, Inspector Collinss official report 
(which lies before me as I write) served to 




show that the possibilities were more 
numerous than might have been expected, 

"In the stretch of railway between these 
two points," said he, " the country is dotted 
with ironworks and collieries. Of these, 
some are being worked and some have been 
abandoned. There are no fewer than twelve 
which have small gauge lines which run 
trolly-cars down to the main line. These 
can, of course, be disregarded. Besides 
these, however, there are seven, which have 
or have had proper lines running down and 
connecting with points to the main line, so 
as to convey their produce from the mouth 
of the mine to the great centres of distribu- 
tion. In every case these lines are only a 
few miles in length. Out of the seven, four 
belong to collieries which are worked out, or 
at least to shafts which are no longer used. 
These are the Redgauntlct, Hero, Slough of 
Despond, and Heartsease mines, the latter 
having ten years ago been one of the 

principal mines 
in Lancashire, 
These four side 
lines may be 
eliminated from 
our inquiry, for, 
to prevent pos- 
sible accidents, 
the rails nearest 
to the main line 
have been taken 
up ? and there is 
no longer any 
c on ne ct i o n. 
There remain 
three other side 
lines leading 
(a) to the Cam- 
slock Iron Works ; 
(h) to the Big Ben 

Colliery ; 
(i) to the Persever- 
ance Colliery, 
Of these the Big 
Ben line is not 
more than a 
quarter of a mile 
long, and ends 
at a dead wall of 
of coal waiting re- 
moval from the moulh of the mine. Nothing 
had been seen or heard there of any special. 
The Carnstock Iron Works line was blocked 
all day upon the 3rd of June by sixteen truck- 
loads of hematite. It is a single line, and 
nothing could have passed. As to the Per- 
severance line, it is a large double line, which 
does a considerable traffic, for the output of 



iv est r>nwN to ken von ju.nctign. 



by LnOOgl C UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



ROUND THE FIRE. 



*57 



the mine is very large. On the 3rd of June 
this traffic proceeded as usual ; hundreds of 
men, including a gang of railway platelayers, 
were working along the two miles and a 
quarter which constitute the total length of 
the line, and it is inconceivable that an 
unexpected train could have come down 
there without attracting universal attention. 
It may be remarked in conclusion that this 
branch line is nearer to St. Helens than the 
point at which the engine-driver was dis- 
covered, so that we have every reason to 
believe that the train was past that point 
before misfortune overtook her. 

" As to John Slater, there ia no clue to be 
gathered from his appearance or injuries. 
We can only say that, as far as we can see, he 
met his end by falling off his engine, though 
why he fell, or what became of the engine 
after his fall, is a question upon which I do not 
feel qualified to offer an opinion." In conclu- 
sion, the inspector offered his resignation to 
the Board, being much nettled by an accusa- 
tion of incompetence in the Ixmdon papers. 

A month elapsed, during which both the 
police and the company prosecuted their 
inquiries without the slightest success. A 
reward was offered and a pardon promised in 
case of crime, but they were both unclaimed. 
Every day the public opened their papers 
with the conviction that so grotesque a 
mystery would at last be solved, but week 
after week passed by, and a solution remained 
as far off as ever. In broad daylight, upon 
a June afternoon in the most thickly 
inhabited portion of England, a train with its 
occupants had disappeared as completely as if 
some master of subtle chemistry had volati- 
lized it into gas. Indeed, among the various 
conjectures which were put forward in the 
public Press there were some which seriously 
asserted that supernatural, or, at least, preter- 
natural, agencies had been at work, and that 
the deformed Monsieur Caratal was probably 
a person who was better known under a less 
polite name. Others fixed upon his swarthy 
companion as being the author of the mis- 
chief, but what it was exactly which he had 
done could never be clearly formulated in 
words. 

Amongst the many suggestions put forward 
by various newspapers or private individuals, 
there were one or two which were feasible 
enough to attract the attention of the public. 
One which appeared in the Times, over the 
signature of an amateur reasoner of some 
celebrity at that date, attempted to deal with 
the matter in a critical and semi-scientific 
manner. An extract must suffice, although 



the curious can see the whole letter in the 
issue of the 3rd of July. 

" It is one of the elementary principles of 
practical reasoning," he remarked, "that 
when the impossible has been eliminated the 
residuum, however improbable, must contain 
the truth. It is certain that the train left 
Kenyon Junction. It is certain that it did 
not reach Barton Moss. It is in the highest 
degree unlikely, but still possible, that it 
may have taken one of the seven available 
side lines. It is obviously impossible for a 
train to run where there are no rails, and, 
therefore, we may reduce our improbables 
to the three open lines, namely, the Carnstock 
Iron Works, the Big Ben, and the Perse- 
verance. Is there a secret society of colliers, 
an English camorra, which is capable of 
destroying both train and passengers ? It is 
improbable, but it is not impossible. I con- 
fess that I am unable to suggest any other 
solution. I should certainly advise the 
company to direct all their energies towards 
the observation of those three lines, and of 
the workmen at the end of them. A careful 
supervision of the pawnbrokers' shops of the 
district might possibly bring some suggestive 
facts to light" 

The suggestion coming from a recognised 
authority upon such matters created consider- 
able interest, and a fierce opposition from 
those who considered such a statement to be 
a preposterous libel upon an honest and 
deserving set of men. The only answer to 
this criticism was a challenge to the objectors 
to lay any more feasible explanation before 
the public. In reply to this two others were 
forthcoming (Times, July 7th and 9th). The 
first suggested that the train might have run 
off the metals and be lying submerged in the 
Lancashire and Staffordshire Canal, which 
runs parallel to the railway for some hundreds 
of yards. This suggestion was thrown out of 
court by the published depth of the canal, 
which was entirely insufficient to conceal so 
large an object. The second correspondent 
wrote calling attention to the bag which 
appeared to be the sole lugf.nge which the 
travellers had brought with them, and suggest- 
ing that some novel explosive of immense 
and pulverizing power might have been con- 
cealed in it. The obvious absurdity, how- 
ever, of supposing that the whole train might 
be blown to dust while the metals remained 
uninjured reduced any such explanation to 
a farce. The investigation had drifted into 
this hopeless position when a new and most 
unexpected incident occurred, which raised 
hopes never destined to be fulfilled. 



by L^OOgle 



■_-l l '_| 1 1 l '.1 1 1 1 ■_' 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



iS3 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE 



This was nothing less than the receipt by 
Mrs, McPherson of a letter from her husband, 
James McPherson, who had been the guard 
of the missing train. The letter, which was 
dated July 5th, 1890, was dispatched from 
New YorlL and came to hand upon July 




A LETTER FROM JAMES MCFHtKSON." 

14th, Some doubts were expressed as to its 
genuine character, but Mrs. McPherson was 
positive as to the writing, and the fact that it 
contained a remittance of a hundred dollars 
in five-dollar notes was enough in itself to dis- 
count the idea of a hoax. No address was 
given in the Letter, which ran in this way : — 

" My dear Wife, —I have been thinking a 
great deal, and I find it very hard to give you 
up. The same with Lizzie. I try to fight 
against it, but it will always come back 
to me. I send you some money which will 
change into twenty English pounds. This 
should be enough to bring both Lizzie and 
you across the Atlantic, and you will find the 
Hamburg boats which stop at Southampton 
very good boats, and cheaper than Liverpool. 
If you could come here and stop at the 
Johnston House I would try and send you 
word how to meet, but things are very difficult 
with me at present, and I am not very happy, 
finding it hard to give you both up. So no 
more at present, from your loving husband, 
"James McPherson," 



by 



L,c 



k" 



For a time it was confidently anticipated 
that this letter would lead to the clearing up 
of the whole matter, the more so as it was 
ascertained that a passenger who bore a close 
resemblance to the missing guard had 
travelled from Southampton under the name 
of Summers in the Hamburg and New York 
liner Vistula, which started upon the 7th of 
June, Mrs, McPherson and her sister 
Lizzie Dolton went across to New York as 
directed, and stayed for three weeks at the 
Johnston House, without hearing anything 
from the missing man, It is probable that 
some injudicious comments in the Press 
may have warned him that the police were 
using them as a bait. However this may 
ho, it is certain that he neither wrote nor 
came, and the women were eventually 
compelled to return to Liverpool 

And so the matter stood, and has 
continued to stand up to the present 
year of 1898. Incredible as it may 
seem, nothing has transpired during 
these eight years which has shed the 
?V least light upon the extraordinary disap- 
\£ pearance of the special train which con- 
tained Monsieur Ca ratal and his com- 
panion. Careful inquiries into the ante- 
cedents of the two travellers have only 
established the fact that Monsieur 
Caratal was well known as a financier 
and political agent in Central America, 
and that during his voynge to Europe 
he had betrayed extraordinary anxiety 
to reach Paris. His companion, whose 
name was entered upon the passenger lists 
as Eduardo Gomez, was a man whose record 
was a violent one, and whose reputation 
was that of a bravo and a bully. There 
w + as evidence to show, however, that he was 
honestly devoted to the interests of Monsieur 
Caratal, and that the latter, being a man of 
puny physique, employed the other as a guard 
and protector. It may be added that no infor- 
mation came from Paris as to what the objects 
of Monsieur Ca ratal's hurried journey may 
have been. This comprises all the facts of 
the case up to the publication in the 
Marseilles papers of the recent confession of 
Herbert de I.ernac, now under sentence of 
death for the murder of a merchant named 
Bonvalot, This statement may be literally 
translated as follows ; — 

" It is not out of mere pride or boasting 
that I give this information, for, if that were 
my object, I could tell a dozen actions of 
mine which are quite as splendid; but I do it 
in order that certain gentlemen in Paris may 
understand that I, who am able here to teU 
Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



ROUND THE FIRE. 



159 



about the fate of Monsieur Caratal, can also 
tell in whose interest and at whose request 
the deed was done, unless the reprieve which 
I am awaiting comes to me very quickly. 
Take warning, messieurs, before it is too 
late ! You know Herbert de Lernac, and 
you are aware that his deeds are as ready as 
his words. Hasten then, or you are lost ! 

11 At present I shall mention no names — if 
you only heard the names, what would you 
not think !— but I shall merely tell you how 
cleverly I did it I was true to my employers 
then, and no doubt they will be true to me 
now. I hope so, and until I am convinced 
that they have betrayed me, these names, 
which would convulse Europe, shall not be 
divulged. But on that day .... well, I 
say no more ! 

" In a word, then, there was a famous trial 
in Paris, in the year 1890, in connection with 
a monstrous scandal in politics and finance. 
How monstrous that scandal was can never 
be known save by such confidential agents as 
myself. The honour and careers of many 
of the chief men in France were at stake. 
You have seen a group of nine-pins standing, 
all so rigid, and prim, and unbending. Then 
there comes the ball from far away and pop, 
pop, pop — there are your nine-pins on the 
floor. Well, imagine some of the greatest 
men in France as these nine-pins, and then 
this Monsieur Caratal was the ball which 
could be seen coming from far away. If he 
arrived, then it was pop, pop, pop for all of 
them. It was determined that he should not 
arrive. 

" I do not accuse them all of being con- 
scious of what was to happen. There were, 
as I have said, great financial as well as 
political interests at stake, and a syndicate 
was formed to manage the business. Some 
subscribed to the syndicate who hardly 
understood what were its objects. But others 
understood very well, and they can rely upon 
it that I have not forgotten their names. 
They had ample warning that Monsieur 
Caratal was coming long before he left South 
America, and they knew that the evidence 
which he held would certainly mean ruin to 
•all of them. The syndicate had the com- 
mand of an unlimited amount of money — 
absolutely unlimited, you understand. They 
looked round for an agent who was capable of 
wielding this gigantic power. The man chosen 
must be inventive, resolute, adaptive — a man 
in a million. They chose Herbert de Lernac, 
fuad I admit that they were right 
v " My duties were to choose my subordinates, 
.fc> use freely the power which money gives, 



by Google 



and to make certain that Monsieur Caratal 
should never arrive in Paris. With charac- 
teristic energy I set about my commission 
within an hour of receiving my instructions, 
and the steps which I took were the very 
best for the purpose which could possibly be 
devised. 

" A man whom I could trust was dis- 
patched instantly to South America to travel 
home with Monsieur Caratal. Had he 
arrived in time the ship would never have 
reached Liverpool ; but, alas, it had already 
started before my agent could reach it I 
fitted out a small armed brig to intercept it, 
but again I was unfortunate. Like all great 
.organizers I .was; however, prepared for 
failure, and had a series of alternatives pre- 
pared, one or the other of which must 
succeed. You must not underrate the 
difficulties of my undertaking, or imagine 
that a mere commonplace assassination 
would meet the case. We must destroy 
not only Monsieur Caratal, but Monsieur 
Caratal's documents, and Monsieur Caratal's 
companions also, if we had reason to believe 
that he had communicated his secrets to 
them. And you must remember that they 
were on the alert, and keenly suspicious of 
any such attempt It was a task which was 
in every way worthy of me, for I am always 
most masterful where another would be 
appalled. 

" I was all ready for Monsieur Caratal's 
reception in Liverpool, and I was the more 
eager because I had reason to believe that 
he had made arrangements by which he 
would have a considerable guard from the 
moment that he arrived in London. Any- 
thing which was to be done must be done 
between the moment of his setting foot upon 
the Liverpool quay and that of his arrival at 
the London and West Coast terminus in 
London. We prepared six plans, each more 
elaborate than the last ; which plan would be 
used would depend upon his own move- 
ments. Do what he would, we were ready for 
him. If he had stayed in Liverpool, we were 
ready. If he took an ordinary train, an 
express, or a special, all was ready. Every- 
thing had been foreseen and provided for. 

" You may imagine that I could not do all 
this myself. What could I know of the 
English railway lines ? But money can pro- 
cure willing agents all the world over, and I 
soon had one of the acutest brains in England 
to assist me. I will mention no names, but 
it would be unjust to claim all the credit for 
myself. My English ally was worthy of such 
an alliance. He knew the London and 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



i6o 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



West Coast line thoroughly, and he had 
the command of a band of workers who 
were trustworthy and intelligent. The idea 
was his, and my own judgment was only 
required in the details. We bought over 
several officials, amongst whom the most 
important was James McPherson, whom we 
had ascertained to he the guard most likely 
to be employed upon a special train. Smith, 
the stoker, was also in our employ. John 
Slater, the engine-driver, had been approached, 
but had been found to be obstinate and 
dangerous, so we desisted. We had no 
certainty that Monsieur Caratal would take 
a special, but we thought it very probable, for 
it was of the utmost importance to him that 
he should reach Parts without delay. It was 
for this contingency, therefore, that we made 
special preparations — preparations which 
were complete down to the last derail long 
before his steamer had sighted the shores of 
England. You will be amused to learn that 
there was one of my agents in the pilot-boat 
which brought that steamer to its moorings, 

"The moment that Caratal arrived in 
Liverpool we knew that he suspected danger 
and was on his guard, He had brought with 
him as an escort a dangerous fellow, named 
Gomez, a man who carried weapons, and 
was prepared to use them. This fellow 
carried CarataPs confidential papers for him, 
and was ready to protect cither them or his 
master. The probability was that Caratal 
had taken him into his counsels, and that to 
remove Caratal without removing Gomez 
would be a mere waste of energy. It 
was necessary that they should be involved 
in a common fate, and our plans to that end 
were much facilitated by their request for a 
special train. On that special train you will 
understand that two out of the three servants 
of the company were really in our employ, 
at a price which would make them inde- 
pendent for a lifetime. I do not go so far as 
to say that the English are more honest than 
any other nation, but I have found them 
more expensive to buy. 

u I have already spoken of my English 
agent — who is a man with a considerable 
future before him, unless some complaint of 
the throat carries him off before his time, 
He had charge of all 
Liverpool, whilst I was 
inn at Kenyon, where 1 
signal to act When 
arranged for, my agent instantly telegraphed 
to me and warned me how soon I should 
have everything ready. He himself under 
the name of Horace Moore applied im- 



arrangements at 
stationed at the 
awaited a cipher 
the special was 



mediately for a special also, in the hope that 
he would be sent down with Monsieur 
Caratal, which might under certain circum- 
stances have been helpful to us. If, for 
example, our great coup had failed, it would 
then have become the duty of my agent to 
have shot them both and destroyed their 
papers. Caratal was on his guard, however, 
and refused to admit any other traveller. 
My agent then left the station, returned by 
another entrance, entered the guard's van on 
the side farthest from the platform, and 
travelled down with McPherson, the guard. 




byCiGOgle 



tl A DANGEROUS FELL0W, NAtuEtJ C.0MEE. 1 * 

"In the meantime you will be interested 
to know what my own movements were, 
Everything had been prepared for days before, 
and only the finishing touches were needed. 
The side line which we had chosen had once 
joined the main line, but it had been dis- 
connected. We had only to replace a 
few rails to connect it once more. These 
rails had been laid down as far as could 
be done without danger of attracting atten- 
tion, and now it was merely a case of com- 
pleting a juncture with the line, and arranging 
the points as they had been before. The 
sleepers had never been removed, >and the 
Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



HOUND THE FIRE. 



161 



rails, fish plates, and rivets were all ready, for 
we had taken them from a siding on the 
abandoned portion of the line. With my small 
but competent band of workers, we had every- 
thing ready long before the special arrived. 
When it did arrive, it ran off upon the small 
side line so easily that the jolting of the points 
appears to have been entirely unnoticed by 
the two travellers. 

''Our plan had been that Smith the stoker 
should chloroform John Slater the driver, 
and so that he should vanish with the others, 
In this respect, and in this respect only, our 
plans miscarried — I except the criminal folly 
of McPherson in writing home to his wife. 
Our stoker did his business so clumsily that 
Slater in his struggles fell off the engine, and 
though fortune was with us so far that he 
broke his neck in the fall, still he remained 
as a blot upon that which would otherwise 
have been one of those complete masterpieces 
which are only to be contemplated in silent 
admiration. The criminal expert will find 
in John Slater the one flaw in all our 
admirable combinations. A man who has 
had as many triumphs as I can afford to 
be frank, and I therefore lay my 
finger upon John Slater, and I 
proclaim him to be a flaw. 

£t But now 1 have got our special 
train upon the small line two kilo 
metres, or rather more than one 
mile in length, which leads t or 
rather used to lead, to the aban- 
doned Heartsease mine, once one 
of the largest coal mines in England. 
You wi!l ask how it is that no one 
saw the train upon this unused line, 
I answer that along its entire 
length it runs through a deep cut- 
ting, and that, unless someone had 
been on the edge of that cutting, he 
could not have seen it. There was 
someone on the edge of that cutting, 
I was there. And now I will tell 
you what I saw, 

u My assistant had remained at 
the points in order that he might 
superintend the switching off of the 
train. He had four armed men with 
him, so that if the train ran off the 
line — we thought it probable, 
because the points were very rusty 
— we might still have resources to 
fall back upon. Having once seen 
it safely on the side line, he handed 
over the responsibility to me. I 
was waiting at a point which over- 
looks the mouth of the mine, and I 



was also armed, as were my two companions. 
Come what might , you see, I was always ready, 
"The moment that the train was fairly on 
the side line, Smith, the stoker, slowed- 
down the engine, and then, having turned 
it on to the fullest speed again, he 
and McPherson, with my English lieutenant, 
sprang off before it was too late. It may be 
that it was this slowing -down which first 
attracted the attention of the travellers, but 
the train was running at full speed again be- 
fore their heads appeared at the open window. 
It makes me smile to think how bewildered 
they must have been. Picture to yourself 
your own feelings if, on looking out of your 
luxurious carriage, you suddenly perceived 
that the lines upon which you ran were 
rusted and corroded, red and yellow with 
disuse and decay ! What a catch must have 
come in their breath as in a second it flashed 
upon them that it was not Manchester but 
Death which was waiting for them at the end 
of that sinister line. But the train was run- 
ning with frantic speed, rolling and rocking 
over the rotten line, while the wheels made a 
frightful screaming sound upon the rusted 




Vol. slvL-21 



by Google 



AS WAITING AT A POINT WHICH OVKBI.CJOKis THE JIOL.'TH OF 
THE VINE." 

Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



l62 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



surface. I was close to them, and could see 
their faces. Caratal was praying, I think — 
there was something like a rosary dangling 
out of his hand. The other roared like a 
bull who smells the blood of the slaughter- 
house. He saw us standing on the bank, and 
he beckoned to us like a madman. Then he 
tore at his wrist and threw his despatch-box 
out of the window in our direction. Of course, 
his meaning was obvious. Here was the 
evidence, and they would promise to be silent 
if their lives were spared. It would have been 
very agreeable if we could have done so, but 
business is business. Besides, the train was 
now as much beyond our control as theirs. 

" He ceased howling when the train rattled 
round the curve and they saw the black 
mouth of the mine yawning before them. 
We had removed the boards which had 
covered it, and we had cleared the square 
entrance. The rails had formerly run very 
close to the shaft for the convenience of 
loading the coal, and we had only to add two 
or three lengths of rail in order to lead to the 
very brink of the shaft. In fact, as the lengths 
would not quite fit, our line projected about 
three feet over the edge. We saw the two 
heads at the window : Caratal below, Gomez 
above ; but they had both been struck silent 
by what they saw. And yet they could not 
withdraw their heads. The sight seemed to 
have paralyzed them. 

" I had wondered how the train running at 
a great speed would take the pit into which 
I had guided it, and I was much interested 
in watching it. One of my colleagues thought 
that it would actually jump it, and indeed it 
was not very far from doing so. Fortunately, 
however, it fell short, and the buffers of the 
engine struck the other lip of the shaft with 
a tremendous crash. The funnel flew off 
into the air. The tender, carriages, and van 
were all mashed into one jumble, which, 
with the remains of the engine, choked for a 
minute or so the mouth of the pit. Then 
something gave way in the middle, and the 
whole mass of green iron, smoking coals, brass 
fittings, wheels, woodwork, and cushions all 
crumbled together and crashed down into 
the mine. We heard the rattle, rattle, rattle, 
as the debris struck against the walls, and 
then quite a long time afterwards there came 
a deep roar as the remains of the train 
struck the bottom. The boiler may have 
burst, for a sharp crash came after the roar, 
and then a dense cloud of steam and smoke 
swirled up out of the black depths, falling in 
a spray as thick as rain all round us. Then 
the vapour shredded off into thin wisps, which 



by C^OOgle 



floated away in the summer sunshine, and all 
was quiet again in the Heartsease mine. 

" And now, having carried out our plans 
so successfully, it only remained to leave no 
trace behind us. Our little band of workers 
at the other end had already ripped up the 
rails and disconnected the side line, replacing 
everything as it had been before. We were 
equally busy at the mine. The funnel and 
other fragments were thrown in, the shaft 
was planked over as it used to be, and 
the lines which led to it were torn up and 
taken away. Then, without flurry, but with- 
out delay, we all made our way out of the 
country, most of us to Paris, my English 
colleague to Manchester, and McPherson 
to Southampton, whence he emigrated to 
America. Let the English papers of that 
date tell how thoroughly we had done our 
work, and how completely we had thrown the 
cleverest of their detectives^off our track. 

" You will remember that Gomez threw his 
bag of papers out of the window, and I need 
not say that I secured that bag and brought 
them to my employers. It may interest my 
employers now, however, to learn that out of 
that bag I took one or two little papers as a 
souvenir of the occasion. I have no wish to 
publish these papers ; but, still, it is every man 
for himself in this world, and what else can I 
do if my friends will not come to my aid when 
I want them ? Messieurs, you may believe 
that Herbert de Lernac is quite as formidable 
when he is against you as when he is with 
you, and that he is not a man to go to the 
guillotine until he has seen that every one of 
you is en route for New Caledonia. For 
your own sake, if not for mine, make haste, 

Monsieur de , and General , and 

Baron (you can fill up the blanks for 

yourselves as you read this). I promise you 
that in the next edition there will be no 
blanks to fill. 

" P.S.— As I look over my statement there 
is only one omission which I can see. It 
concerns the unfortunate man McPherson, 
who was foolish enough to write to his wife 
and to make an appointment with her in New 
York. It can be imagined that when interests 
like ours were at stake, we could not leave 
them to the chance of whether a man in that 
class of life would or would not give away his 
secrets to a woman. Having once broken his 
oath by writing to his wife, we could not trust 
him any more. We took steps therefore to 
insure that he should not see his wife. I have 
sometimes thought that it would be a kindness 
to write to her and to assure her that there 
is no impediment to her marrying again." 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



Submarine Cable Laying. 



By Archer Philip Crouch, CE. 

From photographs^ by p&missiott &/ the Indiarubber^ Guttapercha^ arid Telegraph Worh 7 Silufrtown^ E+ 



+2 ***♦•• 




^4 

- 



- 

■ 



1 l \ \ 



- 



Frtnna] 



THE CAHLE STEAMSIH] 1 " RILPIY, 



(PftflfO. 




HIRTY-SIX years have passed 
away since Sir Charles Bright 
laid the first Atlantic cable, 
and the younger generation 
know nothing of the immense 
enthusiasm which the great 
project evoked among all classes at that period. 
Owing to errors of construction this cable 
did not last long ; but when, seven years later, 
the second attempt was made, all the former 
excitement was revived* Special corre- 
spondents accompanied the expedition, and 
the progress of the work, as reported daily 
through the cable, was followed with the 
keenest interest. On its successful comple- 
tion the problem of deep-sea communication 
seemed definitely solved, and subsequent 
cables attracted little attention. But the 
work of submarine telegraphy went steadily 
Oil, and at the present time there are ten 
Atlantic cables, with two more in course of 
construction; while thirty six telegraph ships 
are employed in laying new lines or repairing 
the 130,000 miles of cable already at the 
bottom of the sea. 

Before a cable is laid it has, of course, to 
be made, and all the cables now in existence 
have, with a few insignificant exceptions, 
cotne from three large cable factories on the 

Digitized by L»< 



banks of the Thames. Till within the last 
four or five years England was the 01 ly 
country which manufactured submarine 
cables, hut now France and Italy have 
appeared as competitors in the industry. The 
amount they make, however, is at present 
inconsiderable, 

A submarine cable consists of three por- 
tions : the conductor, or central copper wire, 
through which the electric current passes ; 
the insulator, or gutta-percha covering, 
designed to prevent the escape of electricity ; 
and the sheathing, or outer steel wires, added 
to give the cable sufficient strength to be 
proof against the strain of laying and 
picking up. The conductor, which usually 
consists of six fine copper wires stranded 
round a central one, has three coverings of 
gutta-percha alternated with a sticky com- 
pound, to make them adhere perfectly to- 
gether. The smallest air-hole or pin-prick 
causes a fault in the cable, which the current 
rapidly develops till signalling becomes im- 
possible. Gutta-percha is not an absolute 
insulator of electricity, but its conductivity is 
so small, that it may be said to stand in the 
same relation to copper as the rate of a body 
moving through ift. in 6,700 years is to 
the velocity of ligtfl. from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



164 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 




CAIlLE TANK OF SS, " SlLYEKTOWN," WITH CENTRAL CONE 
AND "CMKULtNa," TO PREVENT CAULfc (JETTING FtMJT.EIJ 
i-:--..:-.-t\ IN l-AYING OUT. [Pluto. 

As the completed cable leaves the machine, 
it is coiled into large tanks and covered with 
water to preserve it in good condition till the 
ship is ready to receive it. The tanks are 
built near to the water's edge, so that the 
loading of the ship, which lies in the river, 
may be carried on as conveniently as possible* 
The loading itself 
is an interesting 
process to watch, 
The cable Is hauled 
out of the tanks by 
a temporary engine 
on the deck of the 
ship, and is sup- 
ported in the space 
between ship and 
shore by passing 
overrunning blocks 
suspended from 
scaffolding, which 
is erected in two or 
three empty barges, 
moored fore and 
afL On reaching 
the deck, the cable 
is let down into 
one of the tanks 
with which all tele- 
graph ships are 
provided, Here a 



number of men are stationed to coil it 
in regular turns round a central cone. One 
of them receives it as it descends, and 
running round brings it within reach of the 
others, who place it close against the pre- 
ceding turn. In the case of large tanks and 
a heavy type of cable, this man's work is very 
hard, and he has to be relieved at frequent 
intervals. With a light type of cable the rate 
of coiling is sometimes as high as six knots 
an hour. 

The size of the tanks in a telegraph ship is 
an important point in cabledaying> for the 
larger they are, the wider is the margin of 
safety with regard to the speed of paying out* 

The Sifv€rkrwn y belonging to the Silver to wn 
Telegraph Works Company, is the largest ship 
in the cable fleet Her three tanks are 30ft. 
in depth and average 50ft* in diameter. 
Their cubical contents are one third greater 
than those of the late Great Eastern, The 
size of the tanks gives the vessel a large beam, 
and the bridge is 55ft. broad, which is one 
foot in excess of London Bridge. Her 
draught when fully loaded is 31ft., the 
greatest draught of any ship afloat. 

Previously to laying a cable, it is necessary 
to take careful soundings over the intended 
route. This is done either by the vessel 
which brings out the cable or by some other 
telegraph ship beforehand. Sounding plays 
a very important part in submarine telegraphy, 
for sudden variations of depth, if unexpected 
and not allowed for, often prove fatal to a 
cable. The sounding apparatus is usually 





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Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



A Strange Beginning. 

By (i. M. Roiuns. 

- I slew 

Myself in lhal moment ; a ruffian lies 
Somewhere : your slave see, born in his place. 

— Robert Buowning. 




T was not often that Mildred 
found herself in a difficulty. 
In these days of health, energy, 
and independence, young 
women for the most part are 
safe and sensible — and pos- 
sibly distress of mind had something to do 
with the very unusual imprudence which, 
added to a chapter of accidents, had caused 
so good a cyclist, and so accustomed a 
traveller, to allow herself to be benighted on 
Widemoor. 

The sun dipped behind the rugged crown 
of the Elf Tor just as she reached the 
summit of the great hill beyond Stagford, 
where the wildness of the moor really begins. 
She was tired out with a long day, and her 
heart was heavy— a most unusual thing in 
her experience. The day had been extremely 
hot, and not a breath of air floated towards 
her from the vast, hushed expanse of darken- 
ing moorland which lay before her, the 
lonely road dimly glimmering in the growing 
obscurity. 

Darkness was of course in itself not a thing 
to be feared. Her well-trimmed lamp was 
full, and she had twice or thrice been over 
the road before. For her brother was 
chaplain to the great gaol which lay at Kings- 
keep in a hollow of the hills ; and she was 
paying him a visit of several weeks' duration. 

But to-night there was something weird, 
grim, threatening, in the aspect of the moor. 
A long, sullen, purple storm was travelling 
slowly upward from the east ; already it fiad 
arched over all the heavens except the 
ultimate west, where, under a lowering prison-^ 
bar, the red sun shot one bloodshot glance — 
"to see the plain catch its estray,"as Mildred 
whispered to herself. 

That truly awful feeling which solitude 
sometimes engenders — the feeling that Nature 
is lying in wait to trap you— was strong upon 
the girl to-night. But her small, composed, 
resolute face showed no sign of flinching. 
Reach Kingskeep that night she must, storm 
or no storm, for Alan, her brother, was 
expecting her. Her hope was to gain the 
little inn at Druid's Bridge before the 
tempest overtook her, and shelter there until 
the worst was over. 

As she paused on the summit, the last red 



shaft of radiance was withdrawn, like the 
closing of a wicked eye. She lit her lamp, 
mounted, and was soon sailing down the first 
billow of the heaving moor. When she got 
to the bottom, the hills had gathered them- 
selves together against her, and closed her 
round : no world existed now but the breath- 
less silence of the great desolate wilderness. 
Still the road flickered before her, and she 
made good pace ; but, alas ! she was riding 
a race in which she could not hope to win. 
Long, long before she drew near Druid's 
Bridge, the thunder had opened its batteries, 
and the spears of the lightning were thrust- 
ing the prone earth through and through. 

Then came the hissing deluge of the rain, 
— faster, harder, each moment more irre- 
sistible; till Mildred was drenched through 
her serviceable serge to her delicate skin, and, 
realizing that she was conquered, dismounted, 
panting, to see if the inhospitable waste could 
offer any shelter. Juist then there caught her 
eye, dimly outlined against the sky, a huge, 
barred, skeleton object, which she knew to 
be the water-wheel, which still hung over the 
deserted mines. 

Close to that wheel she remembered that 
there stood a small stone building — even if 
roofless, it would be better than the open. 
Wheeling her machine, she plunged into the 
spongy turf which lay to the right of the road, 
and, blinded by the streaming rain, and 
impeded by her soaked shoes and clinging 
skirt, struggled bravely on, till she almost 
pitched headlong into the brick sluice over 
which the idle wheel forlornly hung. The 
sluice was usually dry, but now the water was 
leaping and gurgling down it; a flash of 
lighthing rent the sky, and showed her the 
crumbling stone hut. Carefully pushing her 
bicycle through the doorway, she bestowed it 
and herself under a sloping bit of roof which 
the shepherds had contrived in one corner, 
and, with heaving heart and panting breath, 
felt herself victorious. Her first care was her 
precious lamp, without which her chance of 
again striking the road she had abandoned 
was precarious. 

It was burning steadily. She extracted a 
rag from her wallet, and carefully wiped both 
her lamp and her handle-bar, with a enre and 
composure which seemed to indicate a healthy 



i66 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 




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LANDING CABLE AT BAHIA, HKAZ1L. SHOWING HAILING LINE AND BALUX>tf BUOVS SUPPORTING CABLE. 



"Silvertown " Company is to attach two 
** spider sheave s," or large V-shaped wheels, 
to san$] anchors securely buried on the beach 
and about sixty yards apart, A strong line is 
then run from the ship round these two wheels 
and back again. One end is secured to the 
end of the cable, and the other end is hauled 
on to by the heaving-in machinery on board. 
The cable end itself has already been brought 
out of the tank to the stern of the vessel. On 
its way it takes three turns round the paying- 
out drum, and thence passes under the dyna- 
mometer, a machine 
for measuring the 
strain on the cable 
during laying. 

When all is ready 
the word is given to 
heave- in on the line, 
and the cable starts 
on its journey to the 
shore. In order to 
prevent it sinking to 
the bottom on its 
way, large india-rub- 
ber balloon buoys, 
nearly a yard in 
diameter, are at- 
tached at intervals of 
30ft, to 6oft,, and 
support it 2 ft. or 3ft. 
below the surface. 
Meanwhile a trench 
has been opened up 
from the shore to the 
hut, to receive the 
cable and shelter it 




JKm a] 



INDlA-kUIHHiH BALIiOOh" UfUY. 



from the injurious effects of exposure to the 
sun. On reaching the shore it is laid along 
this trench and the end inserted through the 
flooring into the hut, where it is connected 
to the speaking instruments, and establishes 
communication with the ship. 

The cable is now released from the buoys, 
and when the cable hands have returned to 
the ship, the anchor is weighed, and "paying 
out" commences. The rate, at first slow, is 
considerably accelerated on reaching the 
lighter type of cable, and the Silvertmvn can 

lay at the rate of nine 
knots and sometimes 
even ten knots, the 
size of her tanks 
making the operation 
free from danger The 
first shore end is 
usually buoyed some 
ten to twenty miles 
from shore, and then 
the vessel steams on 
to land the shore 
end at the second of 
the two places which 
are to be put in tele- 
graphic communica- 
tion. If the cable is 
a long one, such as 
an Atlantic cable, it 
will take at least ten 
or twelve days. 
Relays of watches 
give unremitting at* 
tention to every 
detail of the work. 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



SUBMARINE CABLE LAYING. 



167 



The engineer-in-chief decides the amount of 
s/ack cable— that is, cable in excess of the 
distance travelled — which the depth and the 
character of the sea bottom necessitate. 

The rate of paying out is regulated by 
varying the amount of the weights on the 
paying-out drum. A man is stationed at a 
hand -wheel in front of the dynamometer to 
watch the strain it registers, and to increase 
or decrease the pressure of the brakes, 
according as this strain is too little or 



watches the small round spot of light, thrown 
by the mirror of the galvanometer, as it 
quivers on the darkened scale. Every five 
minutes, almost to the second, this small 
spot gives a sudden leap, proving that the 
electrician left ashore in the hut has sent his 
signal up to time, and that the continuity of 
the inner wire remains unbroken. Should 
the spot suddenly vanish from the scale and 
not return, the electrician knows that a fault 
has developed, the engineer in-chief is at 




LANDING SHORE KM 13 AT FEfcN'ASnO NQTiONHA. 



tPAflte, 



too great In the tank from which the 
cable is being paid out, half-a-dozen men 
are employed removing the thin laths of 
wood between the flakes, and keeping watch 
on the cable, as it rises from its bed like an 
interminable snake, and ascends wriggling 
and twisting to the eye-hole at the top of the 
tank. The foreman stands above, close to an 
electric bell-push communicating with the 
engine-room, ready to ring u stop her '* directly 
anything goes wrong, The enormous strain 
thrown upon a cable by a foul in the tanks 
may be better understood when it is known 
that, if paying out in 2,yoo fathoms at only 
6yi knots an hour, from the stem of the ship 
to the spot where the cable touches the 
ground there is a length of no less than twenty- 
seven statute miles, a particular point of cable 
taking over three hours to reach the bottom* 

But perhaps the most interesting work is 
to be seen in the testing-room. Here the 
electrician sits at his post in front of an array 
of testing instruments, with their bright brass 
terminals and glossy ebonite bases, and 



by LiOOgLC 



once informed, and the ship is stopped. 
The cable is then picked up with a grapnel, 
several kinds of which are shown in the next 
illustration. When the fault comes on board, 
it is cut out, the two ends spliced, and 
paying out resumed. 

At length the ship comes up to the buoy 
attached to the cable which was the first to 
be laid, the end is hauled on board and 
spliced to the cable which the ship has been 
paying out, and which has been cut and 
brought round to the bows for the purpose. 
On the completion of the splice, it is carefully 
lowered over the bows by a couple of manila 
ropes, and when it is well clear of the ship 
the signal is given, two men with sharp axes 
sever the two ropes, and the cable disappears 
with a farewell swish beneath the surface. 

The interest of a cable expedition is not 
confined to the work alone. Cable engineers 
are the greatest travellers of any profession, 
the Navy, of course, excepted. An officer in 
the mercantile marine is not, as a rule, 
acquainted with as many coasts as a sub- 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



i68 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



marine telegraph engineer his equal in age. 
For a ship's officer, after his apprenticeship 
in sailing vessels, usually enters a line of 
steamers which call, voyage after voyage, at the 
same places with unvarying routine \ whereas 



West Coast at that season of the year was 
far more deadly than Brazil Leave was, 
however, granted to land the cable at 
a certain spot, which was to be roped off and 
guarded by a cordon of soldiers. There was 




.a) 



VAPIOU5 KINDS OF GRAPNELS AN1> A MUSHROOM ANCHOR. 



[PiwtiK 



a cable engineer may go to a different part of 
the world with every trip. At one season of 
the year he is laying a cable at some small 
settlement on the West Coast of Africa, con- 
sisting of barely half-a-dozen European in- 
habitants, and so little known that even its 
position is not properly located on the 
Admiralty charts. A few months later he is 
putting in a new shore end at one of the 
busy Australian ports* Plenty of adventures 
lie in his path. Sometimes he is on the 
coast of a South American Republic at the 
height of a revolution, and encounters all 
the difficulties and even risks of laying cable 
from one port in the hands of the Govern- 
ment to another in the hands of its 
opponents. On one occasion the late King 
of Dahomey, before his power had been 
shattered by the French, sent a message to 
the cable engineer, who had erected a hut 
on what His Majesty considered to be his 
territory, that be would come down with his 
amazons and " sweep the white men into the 
sea," if it were not removed at once. 

Ijess hazardous^ but considerably more 
irksome, are the vexatious local regulations of 
small Colonial ports. On arriving at a French 
settlement on the West Coast of Africa, a 
telegraph ship from Pemambuco was put in 
quarantine, although she had been twenty- 
two days at sea t and the climate of the 



by Google 



a heavy surf, through which Europeans never 
ventured except in native canoes, Although 
none of these were allowed to approach the 
ship, the engineer-in-chief determined to land 
the cable. Those who have not tried to run 
an ordinary boat, propelled by oars, through 
West African breakers, can have no idea of 
the difficulties of the undertaking, but two 
boats succeeded in getting ashore with the 
necessary gear, and the cable was landed in 
the course of the day. On the return journey, 
however, both boats were capsized and stove 
in, and as the shore-party could not expect 
the ship to send any more in such a surf, 
they returned to the beach wet through, and 
prepared to spend the night on the sand. 
The governor relented sufficiently to send 
down a tent, together with food and change 
of clothes, which were delivered at the end of 
a pole, and the Englishmen made themselves 
fairly comfortable. The following morning 
the difficulty was surmounted by the crews of 
two native canoes offering to take them on 
board and then undergo twenty-four days' 
quarantine on shore, for which impending 
loss of liberty they wen.' Limply com pens] led. 
This is one of the many fixes in which a 
cable engineer may at any time find himself, 
and their occurrence adds a sense of novelty, 
if not always of undiluted pleasure, to his 
varied career. 

Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



Curiosities in Ancient Caricatures. 



By J. Holt Schooling. 



AMILIARITY with the many 
clever caricatures of to-day 
does not, in many cases, 
extend to an acquaintance 
with equally clever caricatures 
of ancient times. We admire 
the pungent black-and-white sarcasms of a 
Gould, and, to go farther back, of a Gillray 





ft, v ]_ ■> ]\ iy you Viu-va- . . .'—{Mr, Pen ley in 
"The Private Secretary."] 

or of a Hogarth, and there, as a rule, our 
knowledge of the art of caricature stops. 
But there exist excellent examples of this art, 
which date back to very early times indeed, 
and these drawings, which have the quality 
of much intrinsic oddity and grotesqueness, 
have also a historic and social interest, and 
some of them have also a most curious 
resemblance to persons and incidents that 
are sufficiently familiar to us of the present 
day to warrant some reference to these curious 
resemblances to modern things which are to 
be seen in ancient caricatures. 

For example, look at No, I, which at once 
suggests Mr* Penley's facial expression in 
"The Private Secretary " when he was speak- 
ing the well-known catch-words, " Do you 
know , . ," This quaint bit of coincidence 
is, of course, only coincidence, for the 
original of No. i was an ancient South Sea 
Islands' idol, centuries before clever Mr. 
Penley became the idol of a considerable 
section of modern theatre-goers. 

One authority on caricatures says that 

Bufalmaco, an Italian painter, in about 

a,i>. 1330 drew caricatures, and put labels 

with sentences on them to the mouths of 

his figures ; and the word itself is derived 

from the Italian verb caricare, to charge or 

load, and, therefore, it means a picture 
VoL jcvL— 22. 

Digitized by C-OOQ I C 



which is charged or exaggerated. But we 
can go much farther back than the year 
1330, and then find grotesque instances of 
mankind's apparently innate love of making 
other people " make faces." 

No, 2 is a fairly good example of early 
barbaric skill in caricature- This was a 
favourite idol, and its expression of grief, 
with its air of savage wildness, reminds me 
of a gentleman whom at one time I used to 
meet fairly often on the District (underground) 
Railway : sometimes, this idol sat opposite 
to me in the compartment, and one effect of 
his liver complaint was his habit of viciously 
and violently shutting the door from his 
corner seat if by chance a passenger got out 




No. 3,— Suffering from a liver complaint. 

and left the door open. Truly, a most illogi- 
cal way of showing an idol's resentment, to 
inflict an appalling bang on one's own 
tympanum, because another person has 
omitted to do so. The last time I met this 
idol No* 2, the corners of his mouth had 
dropped still more than they do here* 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



170 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 




No. 3.—" Lem-nK-look-*it-tbe'toiifiue," 

Na 3 is an illustration that reminds us 
of Miss Mary H. Tennyson's amusing story 
in The Strand Magazine for January, 1895 
— " Let -me -look -at -the -tongue:" Actually, 
No, 3 formed part of a South Sea Islander's 
club, and the tongue was the business end 
of this weapon. The 
tongue is still out, and 
no persuasion can get it 
back again. 

There is an expression 
about the contour of the 
mouth and jaws of No. 4 
that distinctly suggests 
the premonitory sym]v 
torns of that fearful yell 
of infancy, just at the 
moment before the babe 
"gives tongue" — but the 
developed teeth interfere 
with this theory. To 
while away an idle hour, 
a savage person living 
in an age now remote 
made this caricature of 
his dearest friend, which 
now serves to suggest an 
advertisement of a well- 
known modern dentist 

But what shall we say 
about No. 5 ? These 
distorted and even shock- 
ing features are bad 




No. 4. — A demists 
advertisement. 



by Google 



enough to have been the origin of the 
modern Australian scallywag's term of 
reproach to a passing friend — "Halloa, 
Image I n To which the friend promptly 
replies— "What yer, Face ! * Anyway, No. 5 
was a savage's image, and it is a face — a face 
that has evidently exposed itself to the 
danger against which Sir Thomas Brown, 
an ingenious writer of Charles IL's reign, 
warned a friend when he wrote, A pr&pos of 
caricatures, " Expose not thyself by four- 
footed man- 
ners [bestial 
manners] unto 
m onstrous 
draughts [*>., 
drawings] and 
caricatura rep- 
resentations." 
Concerning 
these interest- 
ing pieces of 
early South 
Sea {not South- 
sea) caricature, 
we should be 
doing an in- 
justice to these 
barbarians if 
in mentioning, 
and showing, 
their grotesque 
productions, 
we omitted to 
take note of 
the tools with 
which they 
worked. Their 
adzes were of 
stone, their 
gouge, or chisel, was made of the bones of 
the human arm—an enemy's arm, for pre- 
ference — their rasps, or files, were of coral, 
and their polishing material, which they 
employed on the sj>ecimens now before us, 
was mainly coral sand. Despite these disad- 
vantages, the savages mentioned are entitled 
to a leading place among the pioneers of the 
art of caricature, and we may see that they 
had a dim perception of the up-to-date 
artistic quality called " actuality/' by 
noting that these early artists appended 
tufts of real hair to their works— see No. 
3— and real teeth — see Nos. 4 and 5. 
Moreover, these are real, tangible caricatures, 
that can be touched and handled, and, as in 
the case of No, 3, forced with a will and a 
definite purpose into the perception of a 
neighbouring brain — however dull If the 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 







.. . 












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Nn. 5- — A forbidding tjuprrssiiHi- 



CURIOSITIES IN ANCIENT CARICATURES. 



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hypercritical reader think that these early 
caricatures lack the pointed sarcasm of a 
< iould or of a Hogarth, let him remember 
that these savage sarcasms were based on 
** deeds not words," and let him ohserve 
that the tongue in No. 3 is sufficiently 
pointed to be effective at close quarters 
with the artist who made it. Take my 
word for it, the caricaturist who made 
No* 3 quite understood the art of driving 
the point of his sarcasm home to his 
opponent. 

Caricature No, 6 is the last example I 
shall show of the work of these barbaric 
pioneers of the art with which this paper 
deals : the "intense" facial expression, made 
fun of some years ago by the satirists who 
laughed the more fervid devotees of the 





NoL €u — An u lira-intense young wonun. 



aesthetic cult out of existence, Is curiously 
well suggested by this early example of savage 
art. Here, again, real hair and real teeth 
were inserted in this female mask. 

The art of caricature has flourished at all 
times, and in all places. Pa u son, a Greek 
painter of ancient times, and who is men- 
tioned by Aristotle, showed a perception of 
this fanciful quality of art when he made the 
neat reply now to be quoted. Someone had 
ordered of Pauson the picture of a horse 
rolling on the ground. Pauson painted the 
horse running. The customer complained 
that the condition of his order had not been 
fulfilled, " Turn the picture upside down," 
snid the artist, " and the horse will seem to 
roll on the ground." Even nowadays, the 
art of turning people upside down— in a 
figurative sense — is often used as effectively 



No. 7,— In the upper boxes (old style). 
t 

as was the Greek painter's expedient of re- 
versing his horse. Perhaps the universal 
prevalence of the art of caricature may be 
due to the fact that the generality of 
people are more influenced by pictorial 
representations than by written state- 
ments : witness the extraordinary popu- 
larity of election cartoons, Only the 
other day, a well-known writer said he 
thought that Mr, Gould and his brethren 
might, by their pencils, do more to set 
nations by the ears than anyone could 
accomplish by their pens* 

China and Japan supply excellent 
examples of caricature. No. 7, for 
example, represents an ancient bit of 
Chinese work notable for its deviation 
from the stolid sobriety of features and 
attitude usually seen in the Chinese. No. 
8, again, may be called a Chinese ton 
viva fit (if one can imagine a Chinaman 
being a ban vivani) who is thoroughly 




No. 3.—" Now 3 I winder where he heard thatV 



b ^ T * UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



270 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



are you fallen so low ? I had thought that 
the sudden sight of the man you ruined might 
have wrought your salvation : but you have 
hardened your heart. Is it any use to make 
an appeal to your better self? " 

Venning turned away and groaned. 

" My suggestion is this," said Leonard — 
" that you shall do what you recommended 
me to do— go away. Hide yourself wherever 
you choose. I will go back to prison, and I 
will give Mr. Ridsdale power to visit my 
solicitor and get the documents that would 
clear me. I shall say what is the truth — that 
I kept silence because I was a single man ; 
there was nobody to care so very much 
whether I was in prison or out of it But you 
had just married a lovely girl, delicately 
nurtured, who believed in you. Your father, 
the old country parson, would have died of a 
broken heart; in fact, the whole of your family, 
and the whole of her family, would have shared 
your disgrace. Add to this, that I was fond 
of you ; that I believed in you ; that I was 
most awfully sorry for you. Those were the 
reasons why I took your punishment on me. 
Have you no spark of shame left in you, that 
you can meet me as you have done ? " 

There was a long, dreadful pause : Rids- 
dale stood, stiff and still, watching to see 
the result of this appeal. No further 
doubt could remain in his mind. Certainly 
Venning was the criminal, and the other 
capable of a most astounding height of 
self-sacrifice. 

The perfumed breeze swept silently over 
the moorland ; far off the corn-crake uttered 
her curious note; there was a tiny murmur 
from the rain-swollen runlet by the roadside ; 
no other sound but Venning's laboured 
breathing. At last he looked up, and 
hesitatingly held out his hand to Waring. 
" Good-bye," he said, " and may God prosper 
your after-life. I will — go .... as you 
said." 

" Good-bye," said Leonard, heartily, " and 
to you also, for a time. Mr. Ridsdale. I see 
my mates approaching— they have noticed 
your light." 

A shout sounded close upon them, in the 
stillness, and Venning leapt, quivered, 
crouched like a beaten hound. 

"All right, Jem Blake, I'm here," said 
Waring, sturdily, as the captors rushed upon 
him. "Steady, boys— I've just got to say a 
private word to the chaplain, and then I'm 
ready to go back to supper. Sorry I knocked 
you down, old chap, but you don't look much 
the worse for it : didn't expect it from such a 
quiet 'un, did you ? " 



by Google 



Mildred's visit to her brother prolonged 
itself into late autumn. 

It is not easy to get a convict out of 
penal servitude when once he is in : but the 
Queen had at last graciously extended to 
Leonard Waring a free pardon for a thing he 
had never done : and one day in September 
Alan Ridsdale brought him away from 
prison, and took him to his own house, 
where he had a suit of new clothes ready for 
him. 

Mildred was waiting by the tea-table in the 
drawing-room— waiting to greet her hero. It 
would scarcely be an exaggeration to say that 
he had never once been out of her thoughts 
ever since their wild, outrageous meeting in 
the ruined hut. She was not an excitable 
girl, but her excitement, as she waited, almost 
mastered her to-day. What was his face like 
in the daylight? Her memory of it was 
etched so deep into her consciousness, as she 
had beheld it, in the smoky light of the 
bicycle lamp, strained, exhausted, disfigured 
with violent effort, yet so self-forgetful in its 
care for her and its self-reproach. 

And Waring's remembrance of Mildred 
was just as intense ; but he was afraid he had 
idealized her ; he almost wished that he was 
not to see her to-day, in the ordinary sur- 
roundings of modern life, in prosaic daylight, 
and pouring out tea — she who had poured 
into his soul the desire to live, and the 
renewing of hope and enthusiasm. 

Was she really as lovely as his remembrance 
of her— or was it a halo cast around her 
by exceptional circumstances, which made 
him imagine her so radiant and soulful a 
being ? 

" And she is quite well ? Absolutely re- 
covered ? " he asked, for the fiftieth time, of 
Alan, as they walked along the low, dark oak 
passage leading to the drawing-room. 

" Well ? Oh, perfectly. Mildred's constitu- 
tion is wonderful, and she made a splendid 
recovery. I — ,"Alan hesitated — "I think, if 
I were you, I would not make any mention 
to her of the injury you did her," he said, in 
a nervous undertone. " It was — altogether — 
rather odd, you know. My sister is almost 
morbidly anxious that the truth about it 
should not get about — it might confuse her if 
you called the matter to her mind just at the 
outset of your acquaintance." 

" I understand," said the ex-convict, as a 
dark blush surged up under his skin, 
"Thanks for the reminder; I should have 
blundered if you had not cautioned me. 
The fact is, I am not fit to speak to a lady. 
You ought to have let me go away somewhere 

Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



A STRANGE BEGINNING. 



271 



first, to be disinfected, and to learn up some 
of the amenities of civilization." And he 
hung back, 

" Nonsense, nonsense/ 1 said Alan, hur- 
riedly ; "you take it more seriously than I 
meant Merely a well-intentioned hint. 
Here, Mildred,'' he had pushed open the 
door, u here's Mr. Waring ! " 

The sudden radiance of the afternoon sun- 
shine, of the pale, pure tints of the fresh 
little room with its glitter of flowers and 
china and silver, would have been enough to 
dazzle the eyes of the newly-freed prisoner 
without the presence of the daintily-clad, 
slender girl, with her aureole of hair, 
burnished by the sun behind. 

In all his life to come he never forgot her 
as she then stood, in her cream-coloured 
serge go\vn t with her glowing cheeks and her 
proud, stainless brow, that would not be 
ashamed- 
Drenched and draggled as she had been at 
their first meeting, he had yet in a moment 



but something in the spontaneous homage 
of the action brought the tears starting to 
Alan's eyes* 

They talked, and drank tea, and ate cakes 
and fruit Waring told of his plans for 
the future : how a distant relation of his> 
moved by his story, had written to offer 
him a post in Manchester, in a large 
factory. It was a post of great trust, and 
the man in question said he had been 
waiting all his life to find a man really 
qualified to fill it 

And, all the while he talked, his gaze nevei 
left the girl's face. 

At last, Alan had pity upon all the un- 
spoken words in the man's eyes, that 
clamoured for utterance. He looked at his 
watch, and said he must go. 

Silence fell, upon the room when he had 
left it — silence so eloquent that speedily it 
grew unbearable* 

Waring rose slowly from his seat, and went 
over to where Mildred sat, still with the 




realized her breed- 
ing. Now, so far 
from his ideal 
being shattered, he 
seemed for the first 
time to see her as 
she was — miles from 
him, serene, lofty, 
unapproachable. 
Her hand was ex- 
tended — lie took it 

Then the next moment, as if he could not 
help it, he had knelt down and kissed it. 
He was on his feet again in an instant, 
and replying fairly steadily to her greeting : 



-**** a : 



THE KFKT MOMENT HR HAD KNELT DOWN. 



bydC 



k" 



glory of the sun through her hair, with down- 
cast eyes and unreadable expression. 
M Good-bye," he said. 

She looked up, t( You are going already ? " 
Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



27* 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



f Xt must be now, or not at all," said 
Leonard. " I mean, that what I have 
suspected, ever since the night of the thunder- 
storm, is true. I cannot he near you with- 
out wishing for the impossible." 

He broke off; and again fell the eloquent 
silence. After long seconds she asked, 
hesitatingly : — 

** What is the impossible, Mr, Waring?" 

" That you should ever care for me," he 
replied, with startling directness. 

Another pause. At last : — 

"You have not given me much time in 
which to attempt the — the impossible/' 
slowly said the girl; "but if — if — you 
thought you could wait a little while, 
I— I — would make 
an effort." 

He could not be- 
lieve it. (< A convict ! 
You ! n he cried, in- 
dignantly. 

* 4 A hero," cor- 
rected Mildred, 
gently, 

"I could not 
allow it — I will go 
away at once, 5 ' he 
protested, 




"You must please yourself about going 
away," said Miss Ridsdale, rising and walking 
to the open window that faced the glorious 
west ; " but if you meant to go, you should 
have gone before you said — that n 

"No," he replied, following her, " I had to 
say it— 1 could not help it, I had no choice— 
really/ 1 

She turned her eyes up to his as he stood 
over her. 

"Wait," she said; "what do you know of 
me?" 

" The one thing worth knowing," he smiled, 
" that I love you." 

" Is it to end like this?" she said, softly. 
" Who could prophesy such an end to such 

a strange beginning?" 



So he did not go 
away : for after that 
they found many 
things to tell each 
other. 

According to the 
latest accounts, they 
are telling each other 
still ; the recital of a 
mutual experience 
often lasts a lifetime. 



'wait/ she said; * wiiai- 1MJ VOU KNOW of msT" 



by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



A nimal Actualities* 

NOTE. — Under this title we intend printing a series of perfectly authentic anecdotes of animal life, 
illustrated hy Afr+ J, A. Shepherd * an artist long a favourite with readers of Thk Strand M agaze ne. 
We shall he glad to receive similar anecdoi€s x fully authenticated by names of witnesses, for use in future 
numbers. IVhiie the stories (hem seines will ht matters of fact, it must he understood that the artist wi/t- 
tteat the subjects with freedom and fancy \ more wtth a view to an amusing commentary than to a mere 
representation of the occurrences. 







a 



P\ 



LobT 






f YYTTY i i i * i i Li 1 ■ j 



SHE POUND HERSELF SHUT CUT— 




T is altogether old-fashioned and 
out-of-date to talk nowadays of 
animals a little below us in the 
zoological scale as being actuated 
solely by "instinct," This sort 
of thing is become mere ignorant prejudice. 
Let anybody fair-mindedly watch the proceed- 
ings of a moderately clever dog for one day, 
and then deny that dog intelligence if he 
can. Put the dog face to face with some 
circumstance, or some combination of cir- 
cumstances, such as neither he nor any of 
his progenitors could possibly have encoun- 
tered. He may 
not do the wisest 
thing on the 
whole, but, then, 
wtjiild an average 
human being do 
the wisest thing 
in a like case? 
Of course not. 
But whatever the 
dog does will be 
suggested by a 
natural train of 
thought, and often 
by a train of 
thoughtof amazing 

Vol. kvl — 35. 



acuteness. Here is no opportunity for the 
operation of inherited experience, no chance 
for the work of mere blind "instinct." 
Anybody, by the exercise of a moment's 
thought, can recall a dozen such cases to 
his own memory, and probably not cases 
occurring to dogs only, but to other 
animals of all degrees. We expect to 
present our readers with many instances of 
the sort 

First we offer a case rather of audacity than 
of intelligence, but of a very odd audacity. 
It occurred in the winter of the year 1894, in 



•™*&r$$**: 




— IN A CuLD AND SNOWY WORLD* 



by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



274 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE, 



Shire Hall Lane, Hendon, on the premises 
of Mrs. Rowcliffe, Now, in Mrs. Rowel i fife's 
farmyard abode a dog of terrible reputation. 
His savage and* formidable character was 
famous, not only in the farm, but in the 



thereabout as to the exact number of little 
boys and girls per week devoured by way of 
diversifying his diet The dog himself under- 
stood the state of affairs and abated no whit 
of his arrogance. Plainly, the world (of these 




TMli SNUGGEST J-LACJS WAS THE: DCM>klf ttNEL. 



neighbourhood round about Tramps avoided 
Mrs. Rowcliffe's dog, and left chalk hiero- 
glyphics on posts, warning tramps who 
might come after to avoid the jaws of 
this terrible quadruped, and to keep outside 
the radius of the chain that confined him, 
** Beware of the dog ! " stared in large letters 
from a board hard by the kennel, and visitors 
to the farmyard sidled by with a laborious air 



parts) was at his feet, and he was monarch of 
all he surveyed. But there was a duck in 
that farmyard wholly indifferent to the general 
terror—she never thought about it, in fact. 
She was an adventurous and happy-go-lucky 
sort of duck, always ready to make the best 
of what luck came along, and never backward 
to seize her share of the good things — and a 
little extra on occasion* 




"lN FLOUNDERED THE DUCK— 



of indifference, though on the extreme edge 
of the path, and not that edge that was 
nearest the kennel. So this formidable 
Cerberus ruled the district, and horrifying 
legends went among the extreme youth 



by L^OOgle 



Now 3 it chanced at the close of a cold day, 
when the snow lay thick everywhere, that this 
duck lagged away from the returning flock, 
perhaps in pursuit of some pleasant snack 
that it would have been foolish for a duck of 
Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



ANIMAL ACTUALITIES. 



275 



business instincts to make too widely known. 
Anyhow, the other ducks got safely home, 
the pen was shut, and this particular duck, 
our heroine, straggling in alone after closing 
hours, found herself shut out in a cold and 



was so altogether beyond his experience as to 
dissipate his strategy, or whether the sheer 
audacity of the thing induced temporary 
paralysis is not determined ; but certain it 
is that the farm-hands entering in the 




j« * 



— ANP OUT Kl-fiUNDEttLO THE IKkROR. 



snowv world, Never mind — she made no 
fuss, but waddled calmly off round the farm- 
yard to find the best shelter she could. 
Plainly the snuggest place was the dog-kennel. 
Certainly the dog was in it, and snoring, 
but that didn't matter— he'd have to find a 
place somewhere else* So in floundered the 



morning found the dog shivering and 
crouching outside his kennel, and the duck 
squatting comfortably within — within the 
kennel, that is to say, and not within the 
digestive apparatus of the Terror, as every- 
body would have expected. 

That dog's reputation was ruined. Small 



4\AJn 





duck, and out floundered the Terror of 
Shire Hall Lane, with his tail between his 
legs. 

Whether the cold had affected the Terror^ 
nerves, whether the attack of a quacking biped 



rut FAflM-HANns povnu him shivesing oi-tkidk. 



boys openly flouted him, and tramps chalked 
a different figure on gate-posts, meaning that 
any tramp in want of a useless, harmless dog 
might steal one at the place indicated. The 
duck left the kennel when she thought it time 



by VjC 



IC 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 






276 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 




A KUIKBI> REPUTATION 



to go and see what was for breakfast, and 
thereafter used the pen with the others. But 
though the dog got his quarters again, he 
never recovered his reputation. He is a 
ruined, bankrupt Terror. 

Of the ultimate fate of the duck there is 



no record: Probably it was the ultimate fate 
of most ducks — a twisted neck, and the rest 
all gravy and green peas. Though, indeed, 
one would almost expect this indomitable 
bird to arise and kick the green peas off the 
plate. 




II 



^lUclyrrenT* 




H REE years ago " The Cricketers " 
at Addington, in Surrey, was the 



-JSP scene of a sad tragedy of love at 



first sight, unrequited and, indeed 3 
jeered at. Mrs. Ovenden was the 



landlady of "The 
Cricketers" at 
that time — a 
charming old 
lady, who died, 
alas ! early in 
the present year 
— and lt The 
Cricketers" faced 
Addington 
Pal ace j the 
Archbishop of 
Can t erb ury'f 
residence. 



A small farmyard was attached to the inn, 
well populated with the usual sorts of birds. 
Mrs, Ovenden made an addition to these by 
the purchase of a few geese — one a particu- 
larly fat one. Now, all was happy in that 




by Google 



5I1E CONCEIVED A VIOLENT ATTACHMENT FDR THE COCK* 

Original from 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



ANIMAL ACTUALITIES. 



277 




THE COCK WAS SCANDALIZED — 



farmyard before the arrival of those geese. 
The hens agreed as well together as hens 
usually do, the chicks found 
plenty of amusement and 
few disappoint me tits, and 
the cock lorded it over all, 
loved and respected by his 
subjects, and an ornament 
and a credit to the yard. 
But the fat goose brought 
strife, discord, and jealousy. 
The moment her eye fell on 
the cock she conceived a 
violent attachment for him. 
The cock, a very respectable 
bird, was naturally scanda- 
lized, and did his best to 
avoid the fat goose, But in 
vain j for the fat goose cut 
him off from his family and 
headed him away. She 
urged him before her, and finally shut him 
safely in a corner, standing before him to 



defend her acqui- 
sition, while the 
unfortunate cock 
humped himself 
forlornly and 
brood ed over 
plans of escape, 
and the indignant 
hens stared and 
gasped at an out- 
rage so entirely 
foreign to all their 
experience of the 
world of farm- 
yards. 

After a while 
the cock resolved 
that, at least, he would not be starved, and 
made a motion to go and pick up some- 




Ja^ 




Tilt KBttS WEkE STOHl'ED KV THE FAT GUPSE. 



-ANP hROOUEU OVER PLANS OF ESCAJ'K, 

thing to eat The fat goose reflected that 
this desire for food was only reasonable, 

and allowed her 
pet to emerge 
from the corner 
for the purpose, 
but of course 
under her strict 
surveillance. The 
cock, cheered a 
little by the con- 
cession, proceeded 
to peck about in 
his accustomed 
manner, and 
made a very fair 
meal T considering 
the circumstances. 
Becoming fairly 
satisfied himself, 
and still perceiving 



by 



Gc 



Ic 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



2? 8 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 




AN INDIGNATION MEETING. 

a few grains scattered tiear, he raised his 
voice, according to habit, with a cluck and a 
gobble, to call his faithful hens and chicks 
to the remnants of 
the feast. They 
came with the usual 
rush, but were 
stopped in full 
career by the fat 
goose, and driven 
back in confusion. 
Reasonable refresh- 
ment she would 
permit, but no re- 
newal of old family 
tics. 

This was the 
beginning of a sad 
life for the beloved 
rooster, A goose in 
love never listens 
to either reason or 
ridicule, and indig- 
nation meetings of 



the hens frere as ineffectual as the 
open scorn and derision of the 
whole farmyard, The fat goose 
followed the cock about wherever 
he went, and passing travellers were 
attracted by the sight, and called in 
at " The Cricketers n to ask an 
explanation of the phenomenon. 
The unhappy hens and chicks were 
deserted entirely, and the persecuted 
rooster seemed to meditate suicide. 
So things went, till at last relief 
came from an unexpected quarter. 

Mrs, Ovenden hid a favourite 
little niece, and, after this unhappy 
state of family affairs in the farmyard had 
lasted some time, the little niece had a birth- 
day, Mrs. Ovenden resolved to celebrate 




THE tiEWlSlOh OF THE WHOLE FARMYARD. 




* ' lift R AT K V. JO I CI N GS, ' 



by 



Google 



this birthday by a dinner, to 
grace which the best available 
goose should come to the 
roasting-jack, The love-lorn 
goose had lost no flesh in con- 
sequence of its unrequited 
affection— was fatter than ever, 
in fact. So Mrs. Ovenden J s 
choice fell on this goose, and 
this goose fell into a glorious 
state of gravy and stuffing, to 
the great honour of the little 
niece's birthday. The incubus 
was removed from the farm- 
yard, the rooster returned to 
the bosom of his family, and 
was received with great 
rejoicings. 

Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



ANIMAL A CTVA LI TLBS. 



2 79 




in. 



P\ Dog, £>Jory 



il>s> 




|£S1HE hero of this little tale was an 
£*b ordinary dog enough to look at 
v£?f — a comm on fox -terrier r and not 
particularly well bred— by name, 
Zig* Hut his character was 
extraordinary, indeed. He had a most 



He would dive to the bottom of any pond* 
however deep, and bring up anything he 
might find. Great crowds would collect to 
watch his extraordinary feats, and his owner, 
Mr. G. C + Green, now of Buluwayo (then living 
in Bromley, Kent), was extremely proud of 




l!E FflUVU HIS WAV I1ARBF.D BV A PAUNG/ 



violent temper, and a most wonderful 
individuality and independence of everybody 
and everything ; and his pluck was almost 
incredible— fear of any sort or kind he knew 
not the meaning of. His great accomplish- 
ment was diving — an accomplishment 
entirely self-taught, and one he delighted in* 



him. Zig would deliberately walk into a pond 
from the edge, along the bottom , and then 
swim to the surface with any treasure that he 
may have found. On one occasion he dived 
into one of the Keston ponds and brought up 
from the bottom an old, water- logged hop- pole. 
The thing was big and heavy enough, but 




i' i 



UK SAT IMHVN AND THOUGHT THE DIFFICULTY OVER, 



byG< 



iOO 
o 



e 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



2 SO 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 




HE LAM* HOLD OF ONE END OF THE POLE— 



Zig was nowise daunted, and struggled ashore of one end of the pole, and backed between 

with it, almost dead with exhaustion. Nothing the posts of the fence, dragging his property 

would make him give up his prize, and through endwise, finally arriving home in 

presently he set off for home by himself, triumph with the pole. There can be no 

dragging the pole with him, regardless of his question of the exercise of deliberate reason 










\* \./ 



—AND PACK en BETWEEN' THE POSTS. 



master He took a short cut (that was his 
independent way), and presently found his 
way barred by a paling. The pole wouldn't 
go through as he was carrying it, so Zig, who 
was being closely watched, just sat down and 
thought the difficulty over. Then he laid hold 



in a case like this. In addition to Mr. Green 
himself, the feat was witnessed by Mr W, H. 
Hawkins and Mr, J. A, Shepherd. 

Poor Zig was drowned at last, in course of 
a stroll along a pond-bottom. He never rose to 
the surface, and doubtless was caught by weeds. 




by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



THE IVORY CROSS. 



391 



cried, in agony. "They are coming to 
arrest you," 

His eyes grew hard, and he looked at her 
with a bitter smile. She could not mistake 
the meaning of that look. 

" You think that it is I who have betrayed 
you ? " she exclaimed, in pitiful, heart-broken 
accents. £t Oh, monseigneur, may the good 
God forgive you.' 7 

M The facts speak for themselves," he re- 
joined, coldly. u No one but yourself knew 
of my presence here. Your trap was well 
laid, Marie, and the jewels were a clever bait. 
I hope your ingenuity will secure you a 
generous reward. Open the door and call in 
your friends. I never feared death less." 

She looked at him with an air of bewilder- 
ment, as though scarcely able to comprehend 
the meaning of his words, Then a flush of 
indignation crimsoned her pale cheeks. 

u Monseigneur," she said, " you wrong me 
cruelly, as you will know before long. See, 
the hiding-place is known to no one but my- 
self, Enter it, and you will be safe, JJ 

He still hesitated, and she clasped her 
hands entreatingly. 

u Enter, I beseech you, monseigneur," she 
cried. f£ Listen. They are surrounding the 
house. There is no other way of escape. 
Oh, quick, quick, or they will be here ! " 

With a shrug of his shoulders he turned 
on his heel, and 
stepped into the 
recess. Swift as 
thought, Marie 
thrust the sliding 
panel into its 
place and closed 
the cupboard. She 
had hardly done 
so when the door 
was dashed 
violently open, 
and a crowd of 
gaunt, ragged 
peasants, hustling 
and jostling each 
other in their 
frantic haste, 
rushed headlong 
in. They were 
armed with 
rough ly 
pikes and 
forks, and 
shuddered 
sight of 
brandi 



swarthy faces, fierce eyes, and threatening 
gestures* But the necessity of appearing 
ignorant of their errand led her to make a 
desperate effort to preserve her self-control 
In a faint, unsteady voice she began to 
inquire what they wanted* But their leader, 
a brawny, black-bearded smith, in a leathern 
apron, with a huge sledge-hammer in his 
hand, stopped her rudely. 

14 No lies," he said, roughly, " They will 
not serve your turn this time. You have 
long been suspected and watched, and to- 
night Jean Brissac saw two men enter the 
house. They came from the English frigate 
now lying off the coast. One he recognised 
by his voice. It was the Vicornte de Trou- 
ville. The other is now being pursued. 
What has become of the Vicornte? " 

Marie tried vainly to meet his eyes, to 
stammer out some evasive reply. But the 
ferocious expression on the man's coarse 
features struck her speechless, and she shrank 
back trembling with terror. 

t( You refuse to answer ? ' 7 he cried, " Well, 
we shall talk with you presently. Search the 
house, citizens, and be quick about it. If 
our comrades don't put a pitchfork or a 
bullet through the fellow who went skipping 
through the wood like a rabbit, he may bring 
the English upon us at any minute," 

His followers, who had been impatiently 



-made 
pitch- 
Marie 
at the 
their 
shed 
weapons, lean, 




by Google 



' NO I.IKS,' HK SA^n^HTOlvftlOri 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



292 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



awaiting the signal, rushed eagerly forward. 
The cottage resounded with their shouts and 
oaths, the clattering of their wooden shoes, 
the clashing of their pikes, and the crash of 
broken crockery, which in pure wantonness 
they flung upon the floor and trampled into 
fragments. They threw open the door of the 
cupboard, and in an agony of fear Marie 
buried her face in her hands, stifling with 
difficulty the scream of terror that rose to 
her lips. But, finding it empty, they turned 
away without suspecting the existence of the 
recess behind it. The search was soon over, 
and with malignant looks, and muttered 
threats and curses, they crowded about the 
white-faced girl. The brawny smith pushed 
his way to the front 

" Now then, little viper," he exclaimed, in 
his great, hoarse voice, " do you understand 
that you are a traitor to the Republic, that 
you are guilty of harbouring aristocrats, who 
are in league with the perfidious English, the 
enemies of France ? Well, the punishment is 
death, Marie, death— do you understand? 
The guillotine would slice through that pretty 
white neck of yours like a knife through a 
carrot. Come, come, don't be obstinate, 
child. Out with all you know, or your head 
will be rolling in the sawdust before you are a 
week older. " 

But terror seemed to have deprived Marie 
of the power of speech. She gazed shud- 
deringly at the ring of cruel, scowling faces 
that surrounded her, and her lips moved, 
but the words they formed were inaudible. 
Hitherto, the smith had shielded her from 
actual violence, and evidently wished to save 
her life if she would consent to betray the 
Vicomte. But her continued silence enraged 
him, and he glared at her with a savage 
glitter in his black eyes. Suddenly he leaned 
forward, and snatched the ivory cross from 
her neck with a force that snapped the 
slender chain to which it was attached. 

" Look ! " he cried, holding it out, " this 
is the price of her treachery. She betrays 
the cause of the people for such baubles as 
this." 

The sight awoke the almost bestial 
ferocity that had been fostered in the French 
peasantry of that time by ages of cruelty and 
injustice. They cursed her and called her 
vile names. One spat upon her. Another 
lunged savagely at her with a pike. Grimy 
hands clutched at her ; fierce, flushed faces 
with savage eyes and gleaming teeth were 
thrust close to hers, and she shuddered and 
screamed like some timid wild thing in the 
jaws of a pack of wolves. No doubt she 



would have been stabbed and struck down, 
and trampled to death, if the smith had not 
cleared a space about her with a swing of his 
huge hammer. 

" Back, fools," he exclaimed. " The dead 
cannot speak. Do you wish the aristocrat 
to escape ? Marie Lavoisier, I ask you for 
the last time : what has become of this man ? 
We can trifle no longer. The English may 
be here at any moment If you remain 
obstinate you shall die, not by the guillotine, 
but here and now." 

She fell sobbing on her knees before him. 

"Oh, spare my life!" she cried. "Have 
pity on me ! Do not kill me ! " 

She clung wildly to his hand as she sobbed 
out her appeal ; but her w T hite, quivering face, 
the anguish and terror in the eyes raised to 
his, did not move him. He wrenched his 
hand free, and caught her roughly by the 
wrist. 

" Will you tell us what has become of the 
Vicomte ? " he shouted. 

" Oh, no, no ! " she cried, despairingly. 
" I cannot. I cannot." 

" Get me a rope ! " he exclaimed, savagely. 

Several of the men had brought ropes with 
which to secure the prisoners they had 
expected to take, and one was eagerly passed 
to him. At one end he made a running 
noose, and threw the other across a beam 
overhead. Then, in spite of the girl's screams 
and struggles, he caught her hands in one of 
his and forced the noose round her neck. 
They dragged her to her feet, shrieking and 
struggling, and clutching frantically at the 
tightening rope. In another moment she 
would have been dangling in the air, when 
the door of the cupboard was dashed open, 
and a clear, ringing voice bade them stop. 
They wheeled round in amazement Before 
them stood the Vicomte de Trouville, sword 
in hand. 

With his pale, clear-cut face, slim, graceful 
figure, and air of quiet self-confidence, he 
presented a singular contrast to the swarthy, 
uncouth peasants, who stood scowling and 
snarling at him like dogs beaten away from a 
bone. 

"Ah," said he, in a cool, steady voice, " so 
you inaugurate the reign of liberty, fraternity, 
and equality with the blood and tears of an 
innocent girl. You prate of the injustice 
and tyranny of the nobles, and your own 
hands are red with crimes that make the very 
name of a Frenchman odious throughout the 
world. You cowardly ruffians, your blood 
would sully the sword of a brigand, but I 
think it will give God pleasure to see the 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



THE IVORY CROSS. 



293 



earth rid of some of you. Come, which of 
you desires the honour of dying upon a 
nobleman's sword ? " 

Those nearest to him shrank back as he 
took a step for- 
ward ; but the 
smith, with an 
inarticulate cry 
of rage t thrust 
them aside and 
swung the 
sledge - hammer 
above his shoul- 
der. But the 
blow never fell. 
A man came 
flying through 
the doorway. 

** Save your- 
selves/ 1 he 
gasped* breath- 
lessly, "the 
English are 
upon us ! n 

But the warn- 
ing came too 
late- Crowding 
to the doorway 
they found them- 
5 c 1 v e s c o 11 - 
fronted by the 
bronzed faces 
and glittering 
cutlasses of a 
party of British 
seamen, who, 
landing from the 

frigate, had providentially met Raoul as he 
fled through the wood, and had followed 
him at full speed to rescue the Vicomte, 
The English officer stepped forward, with 
Raoul at his elbow. 

11 Down with your arms," he cried, in 
execrable French, but with a glance and 
gesture that left no doubt as to his mean- 
ing. The pikes and pitchforks, and even 
the smith's hammer, fell clattering on the 
floor. 

M Ah, M« le Vicomte," he said, " I see 
that w T e, are not a moment too soon. Had 
they hurt a hair of your head I would 
have hung the whole crew of them. But 
we must be jogging, or we shall have the 
countryside buzzing about us like a wasp's 
nest." 

The Vicomte picked up the ivory cross 




lying at the smith's feet, and took Marie by 
the hand. 

"Come, Marie," he said, gently, and they 
stepped through the doorway, The lieu- 
tenant looked 
embarrassed. 

" No offence, 
M. le Vicomte," 
he said, awk- 
wardly, "but I 
fear that is an 
addition to the 
ship's company 
to which the cap- 
tain may object." 
" Permit me, 
monsieur,'* said 
the Vicomte, 
quietly, " to in- 
troduce you to 
my fiancee f 
Mademoiselle 
Lavoisier," 

The lieuten- 
ant looked at 
him curiously, 
but a glance at 
Marie's gentle t 
refined face, 
now tinged with 
a faint, rosy 
blush, drove the 
lurking smile 
from his lips, 

"Pardon me, 

M. le Vicomte," 

he said, with 

a bow. " Of course, the captain will be 

charmed to receive mademoiselle." 

Then he turned to his men, and spoke in 
English. 

tl Now, my lads, put your best foot fore- 
mo st 3 or we shall have these French cats 
spitting at us from behind every tree, 
Quick, march." 

The silver casket is still in the possession 
of the Vicomte's descendants, and contains 
many of the priceless jewels that flashed 
and sparkled in the dim rays of the candle 
on that eventful night in 1 793 ; but they 
are regarded as of little value compared 
with a small ivory cross attached to a 
broken chain, once the property of one 
from whom every member of the family is 
proud to have descended. 



BEFORE, THEM STOOD THE VICOMTE, 



by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



Portraits of Celebrities at Different Times of their Lives. 




MR. LIONEL 
E SMYTHE, A.R.A. 

N the early part 

of the year, 

Mr. Lionel P. 

Smythe was 

singled out by 
the Royal Academy as 
one of the new Associates 
to that renowned body. 
Born in London of 
English parents, Mr. 
Smythe was educated at 
King's College, and began 
his artistic career at the 
early age of fourteen. His 
water-colour and oil paint- 
ings have been admired 
for thirty-five years and 
more by those who, not 
being attracted by mere 
notoriety, have, from an 
entirely artistic point of view, judged Mr. 
Smythe's work at its proper worth. His 




Frcm a] 



and then of the Old 
Society, for many years ; 
moreover, as far as the 
Royal Academy is 
concerned, with the 
exception of the present 
year, Mr. Smythe has 
shown works on its walls 
without a break since 
1868, which in itself is a 
splendid record. Alto- 
gether, Mr. Smythe is a 
refined and delicate artist ; 
one who has never tried 
to paint ,l the picture of 
the year," and so is not 
well known to the public 
at large. He lives for 
the greater part of the 
year in an old chateau, 
not far from Witnereux, 
near Boulogne, so that his 
pictures of the Picardy scenery, studied on the 
spot, are replete with sentiment and marked 
with something more than dexterous touch, 



... 

B 9. IDafftasmotirpa. 




Fromn Photo, by] 

pictures of fisher life on the coast of France, 
his beautiful landscape and country - life 
subjects, have found room on the walls ot the 
Royal Institute of Painters in Water-Colours* 



fkESLNT PAY, 

YERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



P0A2 RAITS OF CELEBH1TJES. 



*95 



REAR-ADMIRAL 
DEWEY. 

BOAN 1838, 

Rear-Admiral 
George Dewey is slight 
and short of stature, 
with a fondness for the 
pleasures of society and 
the hunting-field, which 
is somewhat unusual 
with the ideal sailor of 
popular imagination, 
He entered the United 
States Naval Academy 
at Annapolis some thirty 
years ago t and has gradu- 
ally risen to his present 
position. The Civil War 
broke out at the com- 
mencement of his naval 
career, and, under Farra- 
gut, he saw much active 
service in the naval 
encounters of that 
campaign. He was a 
lieutenant on the Alissis- 
sippi when that vessel ran 




the sobriquet of "Dandy 
Dewey " by going into 
action in full dress, and 
never appearing upon 
deck without kid gloves. 
It is remarkable, too, 
that he suffers from sea- 
sickness, and from his 
earliest days in the navy 
he has never gone back 
to sea from a vacation 
ashore without an attack 
of mat - de - mer. That 
he is possessed, how- 
ever, of the highest of 




AGE 21. 

a Photo, fc* R. WiikinMtm* Montptlter* Vt. 




AGE 35. 
From a Photo, by R TFifruuott* 



all qualities in a 
sea -fighter — pro- 
fessional boldness 
—is shown by his recent achievements at 
Manila, which have made him a hero in the 
eyes of his countrymen, and placed him in the 
front rank of the world's naval commanders. 



From a] 



AGE 2& + 



[I'ttoli^rut-h. 



aground off Port Hudson, in March, 1863, 
whilst in range of a hot fire from the enemy, 
and in the work of removing the men from 
their perilous position showed rare skill and 
courage. Dewey is said to be stylish in the 
extreme, and during the Civil War he earned 




From a j*hoto, ha Einwr CAidteriitp, 

UNIVERSITY OF .VJCHlSfflT 



HAY, 

Efvwr Chickerin 



Boston. 



286 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



height. She saw again his tall, stooping figure, 
standing half-dressed in the doorway, his face 
livid with fear, the candle quivering in his 
shaking hand, as he bade her get up and 
follow him instantly. Leaping out of bed 
she had wrapped a cloak about her, and 
rushed after him. That frantic flight along 
the gloomy passages by the dim, flickering 
light of the candle, while the crash of splinter- 
ing wood and the yells and shrieks of the 
frenzied peasants rang in her ears, haunted 
her like an evil dream. 

Fortunately the attention of the mob was 
concentrated on the front entrance, and she 
and her father managed to escape unper- 
ceived by a side door. Lighted torches had 
already been hurled through the shattered 
windows, and the tears trickled down the old 
steward's wrinkled cheeks as he saw the 
flames leaping and writhing about the beauti- 
ful old home of the family he had served so 
long and faithfully. 

They were not pursued, and a compas- 
sionate neighbour sheltered them until the 
fury of the villagers, excited by a revolutionary 
fanatic from Paris, had exhausted itself in the 
destruction of the chateau. In a mood of 
half- contemptuous pity for the feeble old 
man, they had subsequently allowed him to 
live undisturbed in the cottage, which had 
been previously occupied by a gamekeeper. 
He would no doubt have been treated very 
differently had they known that he carried 
out of the burning ch&teau the silver casket 
containing the family jewels, which had been 
left in his charge during the Vicomte's 
absence. 

To restore these jewels to his beloved 
young master became the one absorbing 
passion of the old man's life ; and the fear 
that they might be discovered before he had 
an opportunity of doing so tortured him day 
and night. He was perpetually devising 
some new and more ingenious place of con- 
cealment for them, and striving by all the 
means in his power to discover the where- 
abouts of the Vicomte, who, according to a 
vague rumour, had succeeded in escaping 
from France. 

At last the news arrived that the Vicomte 
was safe in London, but it came too late. 
Worn out by grief and anxiety, the old 
steward had been growing feebler every day, 
and he died without being able to accomplish 
the task on which he had set his heart. With 
his latest breath he had implored Marie to 
devote herself as he had done to what, in the 
eyes of the faithful old servant, was a sacred 
duty ; and Marie had eagerly vowed to spare 



no effort, and shrink from no danger, in 
order to place the jewels in the Vicomte's own 
hands. 

Indeed, the task to which she devoted her- 
self was a labour of love, and she went about 
it with so much courage and energy, that at 
length she succeeded in forwarding a letter 
to the Vicomte. It was carried across the 
Channel by her cousin, Pierre Laporte, the 
owner of a swift lugger and a notorious 
smuggler, who had grown famous for his skill 
in avoiding cruisers and revenue cutters. 
When Pierre returned from a more than 
usually successful run, he brought back a 
reply to Marie's letter. It informed her 
that the Vicomte had secured a promise of 
assistance from the captain of an English 
frigate, and intended to come himself to the 
cottage in order to obtain the jewels. The 
vessel she had seen from the hill might prove 
to be the frigate, and in half an hour or so — 
she flushed and trembled at the thought — 
she might hear his step upon the garden path. 

Marie, as her gentle, refined face and slim, 
graceful figure suggested, was by no means 
on a level with her neighbours as regards 
training and education. The Vicomte's 
mother, having taken a fancy to her when a 
child, had sent her to a convent school to be 
educated, and had treated her more as a 
friend, or even as a daughter, than a servant 
This perhaps mistaken kindness made her 
present lot all the more difficult to endure. 
Her step was growing less elastic, her little, 
white hands rough with toil ; the habits and 
accomplishments she had acquired were 
gradually fading away; and slowly, insensibly, 
she was sinking to the level of the 
coarse, ignorant peasants by whom she was 
surrounded. 

But the misery of extreme poverty, or the 
dread of the guillotine, the inevitable doom 
of those who befriended the nobles, had 
never caused her to waver in her determina- 
tion to fulfil the duty she had undertaken. 
Her heart leapt with delight to think that 
in a few minutes she might taste the joy of 
placing in the Vicomte's own hands the 
jewels that would make him— now a penniless 
exile, earning his daily bread by teaching 
French in London — once more a compara- 
tively wealthy man. 

That her efforts to restore them had not 
been solely the outcome of gratitude for the 
kindness she had received from his mother, 
or a desire to fulfil her father's last wishes, 
was her own secret. Neither he nor anyone 
else should ever know that she treasured in 
her h^jj-e^ry pleasa^ w^d^ had spoken 



THE IVORY CROSS. 



287 



to her, every careless, good-natured smile he 
had given her. She assured herself again 
and again that she would be more than 
content with this opportunity of proving her 
loyalty and devotion, of convincing him that, 
whoever had proved false and treacherous, 
she and her father had been true to him. 

As the minutes dragged slowly by, until 
the brief night was almost gone, she grew 
listless and dispirited. She told herself that 
it was useless to expect the Vicomte any 
longer, and that she might as well go to 
sleep and prepare herself for the next day's 
laborious and monotonous toil Suddenly, 
however, she rose to her feet with a white 
face and wildly beating heart. Surely she 
had heard a stealthy footstep on the garden 
path? Yes, there it was again, A few 
moments* silence ensued, and then she heard 
the low murmur of voices, followed by a 
knock at the door. 

Quivering with agitation, she stepped 
across the room, withdrew the bolt, and 
threw open the door. Two men muffled in 
cloaks, with their hats, in which were large 
tricolour cockades, drawn over their eyes, 
stepped abruptly in and closed the door 
behind them. Something in their appear- 
ance alarmed her, and she shrank back, 
white and trembling. 




1 SOMETHING IK THEIR ABEARANCE ALAkMED Hfck. 



" Are you the citizeness Marie Lavoisier?" 
demanded one of them, sternly, 
" Yes, 3 ' she faltered, timidly. 
" Then I arrest you as a suspect, in the 
name of the Republic." 

" Monsieur," she stammered, " I— I " 

" Hold,*' he interposed tl Listen to rne. 
If you wish to save your neck from the 
guillotine, you will answer my questions with- 
out reserve." 

She gazed at him with a pale, terror- 
stricken face, but made no reply. 

"It will be at your peril if you refuse to 
answer," he continued, harshly. " Is it true 
that to-night you are prepared to receive into 
your house an aristocrat, an enemy of the 
Republic — Louis, formerly known as the 
Vicomte de Trouville ? Speak ! Is it not 
so?" 

Again she made no answer, Her tongue 
seemed paralyzed. The room appeared to 
be swirling round her. She saw the men 
through a strange, luminous mist. 

" I see you cannot deny it," he continued. 
" Well, you shall find that your silence will 
not serve your purpose, and that I know 
everything. You receive this man, this 
aristocrat, chis traitor to the Republic, for 
what purpose? It is in order that you may 
deliver into his hands the family jewels, 
purchased in the past at the cost of the 
tears and toil of the wretched peasants 
who tilled the soil, and suffered hunger 
and misery that he and his ancestors 
might build chateaux, and hunt deer, 
and ride in carriages, and go clad in 
silks, and laces, and jewels. These 
gems belong by right to the people, 
and should be paid into the Public 
Treasury for the benefit of those who 
are fighting against the enemies of 
Trance. You have undertaken to 
restore them to this aristocrat who lies 
under sentence of death. What can 
you plead in defence of such conduct ? " 
The girl's self- control — she was 
hardly eighteen — gave way. This 
hideous, nightmare-like reversal of all 
her hopes overwhelmed her. She saw 
herself already seated on the death- 
tumbril rolling through yelling mobs 
towards the guillotine. Covering her 
face with her hands she sank shudder- 
ing into a chair. 

11 Come," said he, more gently, " you 

are young — you have been misled. 

There, is .yet. time to repent, to show 

pur loyalty Mtfl^he Republic, A 

IhSfllMbl^FiW^iGiliM^ power has 



2SS 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



been placed in our hands. Deliver up these 
jewels to us t and assist us to arrest this Louis 
de Trouville, and we shall guarantee that 
you not only escape punishment^ but receive 
a full and ample reward. Come, time presses 
—what say you ? >5 

The girl rose slowly to her feet and faced 
him. She was very pale, and her lips 
quivered as she spoke, but, in spite of her 
simple peasant's dress, there was a dignity in 
her attitude, in her gestures, in the tones of 
her voice, that might have become a queen, 

M Monsieur," she said> quietly, u that the 
people have suffered much wrong God 
knows to be true. I, one of the people, 
know it, but not, God also knows, at the 
hands of the family of ML le Vicomte de 
Trouville. For generations past they have 
dealt kindly and justly with their peasantry, 
and those who proved false in their hour of 
need, who plundered and burnt their 
chateau, were guilty of black ingratitude, I 
and my parents received countless favours 
from them ; I have eaten of their bread and 
lived upon their bounty. If it must be so, 
monsieur, I will go with you to Paris, I will 
go to the guillotine ; but, as to M. le Vicomte, 
I will not betray him, nor deliver up the 
jewels to anyone but himself*" 

She expected an outburst of wrath, and 




was surprised to see a look of some^ 
thing like relief on the man's face. He 
was about to speak, when his companion 
stepped forward. 

li Enough, Raoul,' 5 he said. " It is 
clear that the girl may be trusted* Let 
us have done with this mummery/' 



As he spoke he removed his hat, and at 
the sight of his face and the sound of his 
voice an exclamation of joy and astonishment 
burst from Marie's lips. It was the Vicomte 
himself. He was greatly changed. The few 
terrible years that had passed since they last 
met had considerably aged him. His face 
was thin and pale, and the smile had gone 
from the brown eyes that had once twinkled 
with kindly merriment, 

" Your pardon, Marie," he said, "I might 
have known that the daughter of Jacques 
Lavoisier would never betray a De Trouville ; 
but the times are evil, and men have learnt to 
suspect even their own fathers, sisters, and 
brothers. Come, my child, do not be hurt at 
our stratagem, I had no fear myself. It was 
this good fellow who contrived it His 
anxiety for my safety makes him over 
cautious. You have stood the test nobly/ 1 

Marie had indeed been cut to the quick 
by his distrust of her. The scene was so 
different from that which she had pictured in 
her day-dreams ; but she made a brave 
attempt to conceal her disappointment. 

" Yes, monseigneur," she said, timidly, 
"that you should act with caution after all 
that has taken place is most natural It 
could not be otherwise. If you will please to 
be seated, m on seigneur, I will get you the 

jewels." 

The Vicomte 
sat down, but 
Raoul, w T ho had 
been watching 
Marie suspiciously 
throughout the in- 
terview, moved to 
the door, He had 
been the Vicomte's 
valet in more pros- 
perous days, and 
had obstinately 
refused to desert 
him. 

" I will conceal 
myselfin the wood 
and keep watch, 
monsieur," said 
he. *' I liked not 
that rustling we 
heard among the 
bushes. It may 
have been, as you 
said, some stray 
animal, but I 
. could have sworn 
'"I heard a foot^ 

IVERSITYQFMIOUfcAN 



THE IVORY CROSS. 



289 



"As you please, Raoul/' rejoined the 
Vicomte, indifferently, u 1 heard nothing. 
Nevertheless, act as you think best." 

Meanwhile Marie stepped to the hiding- 
place in which her father had deposited the 
casket containing the jewels. Ever haunted 
by the fear that he was suspected of having 
them in his possession, and that spies were 
on the watch to discover where they were 
hidden, he was perpetually moving them 
from one place of concealment to another. 
Eventually, with infinite pains and no little 
ingenuity, he had constructed a secret cham- 
ber in which he could safely hide them, and 
could himself take refuge if the villagers, 
as at times seemed likely, should decide 
to arrest him and send him to Paris as 
a suspect The chamber w r as made by 
doubling the partition between two rooms, 
the entrance to it being at the back of a 
cupboard fastened against the wall 

Marie opened the door of this cupboard, 
which contained a few articles of dress, 
hanging from hooks at the sides. Removing 
these she pressed a spring, and the back of 
the cupboard slid on one side, and revealed 
an aperture in the wall Stepping through 
this into the narrow chamber beyond, she 
brought out the silver casket and placed it 
on the table. 

"The jewels are inside," she said, simply. 
H They have remained untouched since my 
father's death. Will monsieur be good 
enough to examine them? The 
list is within. There is not, I 
believe, one missing." 

" No, no, Marie," said the 
Vicomte, deeply touched by 
the girl's manner. " It is un- 
necessary. Your word is more 
than sufficient." 

11 If monsieur would be sc 
good," she persisted, gently, 
"I would accept it as a 
favour/' 

To please her he complied, 
opening the casket, and spread- 
ing the glittering gems on the 
table. Even in the dim light 
of the candle they gleamed 
and quivered with a lustrous, 
luminous radiance. He glanced 
at the shimmering jewels spark- 
ling in rings and brooches, 
bracelets and necklaces, rare 
and priceless works of art for 
which too many of the women 
he had known would have sacri- 
ficed their nearest and dearest, 

Vol. xv\.— 37 



and then at the slim, pale-faced girl, in the 
poor peasant's dress, and was inexpressibly 
touched by her fidelity and devotion. It 
was true then, as he had often thought in the 
past, that broad, white brow, the sweet, firm 
lips, the calm, clear, deep grey eyes, were 
indications of a noble spirit, of a character 
incapable of the craft, and greed, and 
treachery, and the animal like selfishness 
which, amid the brutalities of the evil days 
through which he had lately passed, had 
seemed inseparable from human nature.' He 
noticed her worn face, her roughened hands, 
suggestive of the sacrifices she had made so 
uncomplainingly, and an involuntary sigh 
escaped his lips. 

What unkind Fate had placed that deep, 
impassable gulf of rank between them? Had 
she been of noble birth, how different it would 
have been. As it was, the Vicomte de Trou- 
ville could not mate with the child of a 
peasant It was impossible. With an effort 
he thrust the idea from his mind, 

"Come, Marie," he said, kindly, "the 
jewels are before you. Choose which you 
will. They shall be yours, and will, indeed, 
be but a poor recompense for your fidelity," 

" I wish for nothing, and shall want for 
nothing, monseigneur," she replied, in a 
quivering voice. ** Do not ask me to accept 
a reward, I beg you." 

" No, no ! n he said, eagerly, " not as a 

reward, as a souvenir — as something which 

will remind you of the 

service you have 

rendered to one who 




,1, 



SKH LISTLK3SUY SKLECTj 



VERSITY OF MICHIGAN 






290 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



will never cease to be grateful to you. Come, 
you will pain me by a refusal" 

She listlessly selected a small ivory cross 
attached to a fragile gold chain, the least 
valuable article in the glittering heap. He 
watched her regretfully, with a vague sus- 
picion that she was disappointed and pained 
by what had passed between them, and yet 
not knowing what 10 say or do to comfort 
her. He replaced the jewels mechanically in 
the casket 

"It is time to go," he said. "The east 
was brightening as we came in. Farewell, 
Marie. When these troubles have passed we 
shall meet again, and it may be in my power 
to be of service to you. Then I may be 
able to show my gratitude by deeds and not 
by mere empty words. Au rnmr^ Marie/" 

"Farewell, tnonseigneur," 

The door closed behind him. It w + as all 
over. She had 
nothing now to look 
forward to, or hope 
or plan for. The 
dull, dreary days 
stretched before her 
in blank monotony. 
Ah T the closing of the 
door had awakened 
her from a dream. 
The ache at her 
heart told her what 
mad folly she had 
been capable of, 
what impossible 
fancies and rosy 
visions she had half 
unconsciously in- 
dulged in. In a 
paroxysm of shame 
and self- contempt 
she hid her face in 
her hands, and her 
slender figure shook 
with suppressed 
sobs, The sudden 
opening of the door 

startled her, and she sprang to her feet, her 
cheeks still wet with tears. The Vicomte 
stood in the doorway, looking at her remorse- 
fully, 

" Monseigneur," she stammered. 

** I could not leave you like this, Marie," 
he said, coming in and closing the door 
behind him. "Surely you will let me pro- 
vide you with the means to live as befits 
your training and education. Presently you 
will sink to the level of a peasant, Marie, 
with coarse hands and twisted body, and 




BHK H1U Hfck FACE IK HFK HAN'DK- 



grow old, and sad, and wrinkled, while you 
should still be young and happy," 

"It is better so, monseigneur," she said, 
drearily, 

"It must not be so," he answered, almost 
angrily, " I will not permit it If you will 
not accept the jewels, I shall find means to 
assist you in a way you cannot reject. 1 

have still friends who M 

" Oh, monseigneur," she said, pitifully, " I 
beseech you to leave me. Say no more, I 
beg you. See, the candle is growing dim, 
the dawn is breaking. If one of the villagers 
chance to see you the alarm will be given, 
and you will be arrested Go, I implore 
you, It is the one favour 1 ask of you." 

His face flushed with a sudden resolve. 
What, after all, were the claims of rank and 
title when weighed in the balances with a 
character capable of such unselfish loyalty 

and affection ? 

"No," he ex- 
claimed, passion- 
ately, " I will not go. 
Listen to me, When 
you were but a child 
in the old days at the 
chateau, even then, 
though I struggled 

against it, I " 

He stopped 
abruptly and clutched 
instinctively at the 
hilt of his sword, 
The report of a 
pistol rang out in 
the still air, and was 
followed by shouts 
and the hurried 
trampling of feet 
Marie rushed past 
him and looked out 
In the growing light 
she could see a little 
cloud of blue smoke 
drifting among the 
trees on the hillside, 
and three or four men running at full speed 
along the path that led to the shore. It 
was clear that they had discovered Raoul, 
and were evidently in hot pursuit of 
him. She was drawing back when, hap- 
pening to glance towards the village, she 
caught sight of a crowd of dark figures 
advancing stealthily and swiftly in the 
direction of the cottage, She closed the 
door and turned with a white face to the 
Vicomte, 
"You aQridpiateljfedipmmonseigneur/* she 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



THE IVORY CROSS. 



291 



are coming to 



cried, in agony. "They 
arrest you." 

His eyes grew hard, and he looked at her 
with a bitter smile- She could not mistake 
the meaning of that look. 

" You think that it is I who have betrayed 
you?" she exclaimed, in pitiful, heart-broken 
accents. u Oh, mo n seigneur, may the good 
God forgive you." 

"The facts speak for themselves," he re- 
joined, coldly. (i No one but yourself knew 
of my presence here. Your trap was well 
laid, Marie, and the jewels were a clever bait 
I hope your ingenuity will secure you a 
generous reward, Open the door and call in 
your friends- I never feared death less," 

She looked at him with an air of bewilder- 
ment, as though scarcely able to comprehend 
the meaning of his words- Then a flush of 
indignation crimsoned her pale cheeks. 

" Monseigneur," she said, " you wrong me 
cruelly, as you will know before long. See, 
the hiding-place is known to no one but my- 
self. Enter it, and you will be safe," 

He still hesitated, and she clasped her 
hands en tread ngly, 

" Enter, I beseech you, monseigneur," she 
cried, "Listen. They are surrounding the 
house. There is no other way of escape. 
Oh, quick, quick, or they will be here ! " 

With a shrug of his shoulders he turned 
on his heel, and 
stepped into the 
recess. Swift as 
thought, Marie 
thrust the sliding 
panel into its 
place and closed 
the cupboard. She 
had hardly done 
so when the door 
w ;i s d a s h e d 
violently open, 
and a crowd of 
gaunt, ragged 
peasants, hustling 
and jostling each 
other in their 
frantic haste, 
rushed headlong 
in. They were 
armed with 
roughly -made 
pikes and pitch- 
forks, and Marie 
shuddered at the 
sight of their 
brandished 
weapons, lean, 



swarthy faces, fierce eyes, and threatening 
gestures. But the necessity of appearing 
ignorant of their errand led her to make a 
desperate effort to preserve her self-con troL 
In a faint, unsteady voice she began to 
inquire what they wanted. But their leader, 
a brawny, black-bearded smith, in a leathern 
apron, with a huge sledge-hammer in his 
hand, stopped her rudely* 

"No lies," he said, roughly, "They will 
not serve your turn this time. You have 
long been suspected and watched, and to- 
night Jean Brissac saw two men enter the 
house. They came from the English frigate 
now lying off the coast. One he recognised 
by his voice. It was the Vicomte de Trou- 
ville. The other is now being pursued. 
What has become of the Vicomte ? " 

Marie tried vainly to meet his eyes, to 
stammer out some evasive reply. But the 
ferocious expression on the man's coarse 
features struck her speechless, and she shrank 
back trembling with terror, 

" You refuse to answer ? " he cried, " Well, 
we shall talk with you presently. Search the 
house, citizens, and be quick about it. If 
our comrades don't put a pitchfork or a 
bullet through the fellow who went skipping 
through the wood like a rabbit, he may bring 
the English upon us at any minute." 

His followers, who had been impatiently 




by Google 



ivERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



292 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



awaiting the signal, rushed eagerly forward. 
The cottage resounded with their shouts and 
oaths, the clattering of their wooden shoes, 
the clashing of their pikes, and the crash of 
broken crockery, which in pure wantonness 
they flung upon the floor and trampled into 
fragments. They threw open the door of the 
cupboard, and in an agony of fear Marie 
buried her face in her hands, stifling with 
difficulty the scream of terror that rose to 
her lips. But, finding it empty, they turned 
away without suspecting the existence of the 
recess behind it. The search was soon over, 
and with malignant looks, and muttered 
threats and curses, they crowded about the 
white-faced girl. The brawny smith pushed 
his way to the front. 

"Now then, little viper," he exclaimed, in 
his great, hoarse voice, " do you understand 
that you are a traitor to the Republic, that 
you are guilty of harbouring aristocrats, who 
are in league with the perfidious English, the 
enemies of France ? Well, the punishment is 
death, Marie, death— do you understand? 
The guillotine would slice through that pretty 
white neck of yours like a knife through a 
carrot Come, come, don't be obstinate, 
child. Out with all you know, or your head 
will be rolling in the sawdust before you are a 
week older." 

But terror seemed to have deprived Marie 
of the power of speech. She gazed shud- 
deringly at the ring of cruel, scowling faces 
that surrounded her, and her lips moved, 
but the words they formed were inaudible. 
Hitherto, the smith had shielded her from 
actual violence, and evidently wished to save 
her life if she would consent to betray the 
Vicomte. But her continued silence enraged 
him, and he glared at her with a savage 
glitter in his black eyes. Suddenly he leaned 
forward, and snatched the ivory cross from 
her neck with a force that snapped the 
slender chain to which it was attached. 

" Look ! " he cried, holding it out, " this 
is the price of her treachery. She betrays 
the cause of the people for such baubles as 
this." 

The sight awoke the almost bestial 
ferocity that had been fostered in the French 
peasantry of that time by ages of cruelty and 
injustice. They cursed her and called her 
vile names. One spat upon her. Another 
lunged savagely at her with a pike. Grimy 
hands clutched at her ; fierce, flushed faces 
with savage eyes and gleaming teeth were 
thrust close to hers, and she shuddered and 
screamed like some timid wild thing in the 
jaws of a pack of wolves. No doubt she 



would have been stabbed and struck down, 
and trampled to death, if the smith had not 
cleared a space about her with a swing of his 
huge hammer. 

" Back, fools," he exclaimed. " The dead 
cannot speak. Do you wish the aristocrat 
to escape ? Marie Lavoisier, I ask you for 
the last time : what has become of this man ? 
We can trifle no longer. The English may 
be here at any moment If you remain 
obstinate you shall die, not by the guillotine, 
but here and now." 

She fell sobbing on her knees before him. 

"Oh, spare my life!" she cried. "Have 
pity on me ! Do not kill me ! " 

She clung wildly to his hand as she sobbed 
out her appeal ; but her white, quivering face, 
the anguish and terror in the eyes raised to 
his, did not move him. He wrenched his 
hand free, and caught her roughly by the 
wrist. 

" Will you tell us what has become of the 
Vicomte ? " he shouted. 

" Oh, no, no ! " she cried, despairingly. 
" I cannot I cannot" 

" Get me a rope ! " he exclaimed, savagely. 

Several of the men had brought ropes with 
which to secure the prisoners they had 
expected to take, and one was eagerly passed 
to him. At one end he made a running 
noose, and threw the other across a beam 
overhead. Then, in spite of the girl's screams 
and struggles, he caught her hands in one of 
his and forced the noose round her neck. 
They dragged her to her feet, shrieking and 
struggling, and clutching frantically at the 
tightening rope. In another moment she 
would have been dangling in the air, when 
the door of the cupboard was dashed open, 
and a clear, ringing voice bade them stop. 
They wheeled round in amazement Before 
them stood the Vicomte de Trouville, sword 
in hand. 

With his pale, clear-cut face, slim, graceful 
figure, and air of quiet self-confidence, he 
presented a singular contrast to the swarthy, 
uncouth peasants, who stood scowling and 
snarling at him like dogs beaten away from a 
bone. 

"Ah," said he, in a cool, steady voice, " so 
you inaugurate the reign of liberty, fraternity, 
and equality with the blood and tears of an 
innocent girl. You prate of the injustice 
and tyranny of the nobles, and your own 
hands are red with crimes that make the very 
name of a Frenchman odious throughout the 
world. You cowardly ruffians, your blood 
would sully the sword of a brigand, but I 
think it will give God pleasure to see the 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



THE IVORY CROSS. 



293 



earth rid of some of you. Come, which of 
you desires the honour of dying upon a 
nobleman's sword ? " 

Those nearest to him shrank back as he 
took a step for- 
ward ; but the 
smith, with an 
inarticulate cry 
of rage, thrust 
them aside and 
swung the 
sledge - hammer 
above his shoul- 
der. But the 
blow never fell 
A man came 
flying through 
the doorway. 

'* Save your- 
selves," he 
gasped, breath- 
1 e s s 1 y, * * t h e 
English are 
upon us I " 

But the warn- 
ing came too 
late. Crowding 
to the doorway 
they found them- 
sel ves con- 
fronted by the 
bronzed faces 
and glittering 
cutlasses of a 
party of British 
seamen, who, 
landing from the 

frigate, had providentially met Raoul as he 
fled through the wood, and had followed 
him at full speed to rescue the Vicomte, 
The English officer stepped forward, with 
Raoul at his elbow. 

11 Down with your arms/' he cried, in 
execrable French^ but with a glance and 
gesture that left no doubt as to his mean- 
ing. The pikes and pitchforks, and even 
the smith's hammer, fell clattering on the 
floor. 

"Ah, M« le Vicomte," he said, "I see 
that we, are not a moment too soon. Had 
they hurt a hair of your head 1 would 
have hung the whole crew of them. Hut 
we must be jogging, or we shall have the 
countryside buzzing about us like a wasp's 
nest" 

The Vicomte picked up the ivory cross 




lying at the smith's feet, and took Marie by 
the hand. 

"Come, Marie," he said, gently, and they 
stepped through the doorway, The lieu- 
tenant looked 
embarrassed, 

" No offence, 
M. le Vicomte/' 
he said, awk- 
wardly, "but I 
fear that is an 
addition to the 
ship's company 
to which the cap- 
tain may object." 
" Permit me, 
monsieur," said 
the Vicomte, 
quietly s "to in- 
troduce you to 
my fiancee^ 
Mademoiselle 
Lavoisier," 

The lieuten- 
ant looked at 
him curiously, 
but a glance at 
Marie's gentle, 
refined face, 
now tinged with 
a faint, rosy 
blush, drove the 
lurking smile 
from his lips. 

£c Pardon me, 

M. le Vicomte," 

he said, with 

a bow- " Of course, the captain will be 

charmed to receive mademoiselle." 

Then he turned to his men, and spoke in 
English. 

" Now, my lads, put your best foot fore- 
most, or we shall have these French cats 
spitting at us from behind every tree. 
Quick, march." 

The silver casket is still in the possession 
of the Vi co rate's descendants, and contains 
many of the priceless jewels that flashed 
and sparkled in the dim rays of the candle 
on that eventful night in 1793; but they 
are regarded as of little value compared 
with a small ivory cross attached to a 
broken chain, once the property of one 
from whom every member of the family is 
proud to have descended. 



BKPOKE THEM STOL3U THE VICUMTJf," 



by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



Portraits of Celebrities at Different Times of their Lives. 



MR. LIONEL 
P. SMYTH E, AR.A. 

K?-v\S~E^?^N the early part 

ill III of the y^ T , 
lv iSi Mr ' Lionel E 

"T-- J 1J^|;-. S my the was 
singled out by 
the Royal Academy as 
one of the new Associates 
to that renowned body. 
Born in London of 
English parents, Mr* 
S my the was educated at 
King's College, and began 
his artistic career at the 
early age of fourteen. His 
water-colour and oil paint- 
ings have been admired 
for thirty-five years and 
more by those who, not 
being attracted by mere 
notoriety t have, from an 
entirely artistic point of view, 
Srnythe's work at its proper 



and then of the Old 
Society, for many years ; 
moreover, as far as the 
Royal Academy is 
concerned, with the 
exception of the present 
year, Mr. S my the has 
shown works on its walls 
without a break since 
1868, which in itself is a 
splendid record. Alto- 
gether, Mr, S my the is a 
refined and delicate artist; 
one who has never tried 
to paint " the picture of 
the year, 19 and so is not 
well known to the public 
at large. He lives for 
the greater part of the 
year in an old chateau, 
not far from Wimereux, 
near Boulogne, so that his 
judged Mr, pictures of the Picardy scenery, studied on the 
worth. His spot, are replete with sentiment and marked 
with something more than dexterous touch. 




«] 



AGE 9. 



L/Japuerrarfvjx-. 




pictures of fisher life on the coast of France, 
his beautiful landscape and country -life 
subjects, have found room on the walls of the 
Royal Institute of Painters in Water-Colouis, 



YERSITYOFMICHItiAr 



PORTRAITS OE CELEBRITIES. 



*95 



REAR-ADMIRAL 
DEWEY. 

Born 1838. 
Rear-Admiral 
George Dewey is slight 
and short of stature, 
with ;i fondness for thr 
pleasures of society and 
the hunting-field, which 
is somewhat unusual 
with the ideal sailor of 
popular imagination, 
He entered the United 
States Naval Academy 
at Annapolis some thirty 
years ago, and has gradu- 
ally risen to his present 
position. The Civil War 
broke out at the com- 
mencement of his naval 
career, and, under Farra- 
gut, he saw much active 
service in the naval 
encounters of that 
campaign. He was a 
lieutenant on the Missis- 
sippi when that vessel ran 




the sobriquet of "Dandy 
Dewey " by going into 
action in full dress, and 
never appearing upon 
deck without kid gloves. 
It is remarkable, too, 
that he suffers from sea- 
sickness, and from his 
earliest days in the navy 
he has never gone back 
to sea from a vacation 
ashore without an attack 
of mai - de - mcr. Th at 
he is possessed, how T - 
ever, of the highest of 



AGE 111 

ft*™ a pfcpfr, hy JL Wiikinwn, M^iptiier, VL 





35- 



From a Fhnto. hy R, Pitttnton, 



all qualities in a 
sea -fighter — pro- 
fessional boldness 
— is shown by his recent achievements at 
Manila, which have made him a hero in the 
eyes of his countrymen, and placed him in the 
front rank of the world's naval commanders. 



From a] 



AGE ?B 



[Photograph. 



aground off Port Hudson, in March, 1863^ 
whilst in range of a hot fire from the enemy, 
and in the work of removing the men from 
their perilous position showed rare skill and 
courage. Dew f ey is said to be stylish in the 
extreme, and during the Civil War he earned 




On qin 



uNiYtoffi^Mssr 



Bittton. 






296 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



MISS LOUIE FREEAR. 

BRIGHT little lady, 
full of exceptional wit 
and humour, yet with 
an inexhaustible fund 
of pathos when re- 
quired. Both gifts are so natural 
and simple, that they go direct to 
the hearts of her audience. An 






troupes, including Moore 
and Burgess and Roby's 
Midgut Minstrels, being a 
member of the latter for eight 
years. Puck^ in "A Mid- 
summer Night's Dream," is 
generally believed to be her 
favourite part. Her London 
sm tvssr. include such popu- 
lar plays as * s The Clay Pari- 
sienne," "A Day in Paris," 
a Oh ! Susannah," and "Julia," 
all of which are, of course, 
well known to our readers* 



A'.K 8. 

Prom a Phaio-. by 
II. \V. ftirtl it Co.* 




From a Photo, by th?. Tirnna J*Aoiu. Art 



AC.F. 10. 

From, a Photo, hu Am ami 

Q. Ta V for, 

eminent critic said 
of Miss Freear not 
long ago, "She is 
the Mrs. Keeley of 
our time, the one 
actress left us 
who belongs to 
Dickens's day, who 
can breathe the 
breath of Dickens 

across the footlights." This splendid verdict 
Miss Freear has earned through her untiring 
energy and hard work, and in a great measure by 
her undoubted genius* Considering her youth- 
ful age, one cannot but wonder at Miss Freear's 
rapid risi: to popular favour; that managers are 
aware of Miss Freear J s powers as a huge "draw" 
is fully shown by the fact that her services have 
been retained for Christmas pantomime work at 
the splendid salary of ;£uo per week ! Miss 
Freear was born in London of Irish parents, 
made her first appearance as a baby in arms in 
the farce of u Mr. and Mrs. White," and has 
earned her living in the profession ever since she 
was eight years of age* She has been in musical 



... SENT DAY, 

VERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



From Behind the Speakers Chair. 



XLVII, 

(VIEWED BY HF.NRY \\\ LUCY*) 



MORE than four years have 

a vacant elapsed si net, viewing the House 

place* or Commons from behind the 

Speaker's Chair, one's glance 
instinctively turned to, and lingered upon, 
the noble figure on the Treasury Bench 
seated opposite the brass-bound box* No 
man is indispensable to mankind. But in 
the interval since, on the ist of March, 
1894, Mr. Gladstone finally walked out of 
the House of Commons, members have 




WALKING OL'T FGH THE LAST TJME. 

frequently had occasion to realize how irre- 
parable is their loss. When he spoke, Mr. 
Gladstone uplifted debate from whatever 
rut of mediocrity it may have fallen into. 
That was the power of the orator. When 
he sat silent, his mere presence communi- 
cated to the House a sense of dignity and 
a moral strength easier tn feel than to de- 
scribe, That was the quality of the man* 

1 do not propose in this paper to attempt 
to add to the far-sounding tribute of applause 
and admiration which resounded over the 
death-bed and the grave of the great English- 
man, I have, rather, strung together some 



reminiscences such as may be discreetly 
withdrawn from a record of personal associa- 
tion with which I was for some years 
honoured* 

One day at luncheon at Dal men y, 

a "punch' 1 during the campaign of 1885, 

dinner, Mr. Gladstone, talking with me, 

turned the conversation upon 
Punch work, showing keen interest in the 
Wednesday dinner, and in the personnel of 
the staff. A year or two later, when, being 
in Opposition, he was at fuller leisure, 1 
asked him to dinner to meet a few of my 
colleagues. He replied : — 

6 % Whitehall Gardens, 

"Nov, 14, '88. 
'* Dear Mr. Lucy,— I thank you much for 
the invitation to join the goodly company to 
be assembled round your table on the nth of 
Dec. But I am living in hope of escape to 
the country before that date, and therefore I 
fear I am precluded from accepting your kind 
invitation, At the same time, if the dinner 
is in any case to come off, and if it were 
allowed me in the event of my being in or 
near London to offer myself, I should thank- 
fully accept such a reservation*" 
(i Faithfully yours, 

MV. E* Gladstone." 




Vol. xvl-ZB. 



together 



HE QtfkUlttLf-ftM¥feREtT IK "PUNCH.' 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



29 s 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



The dinner came off in May of the follow- 
ing year. In addition to the editor and the 
artists of Pumh, the company included Earl 
Granville and Lord Charles Beresford. Mr. 
Gladstone evidently enjoyed the company, 
and was in bounding spirits. We were all 
struck on this close view with surprise at 
his amazing physical and mental virility, at 
that epoch noted by every observer of the 
veteran statesman in public life. He had 
just entered upon that term of fourscore 
years at which, . according to the Psalmist, 
man's days are but labour and sorrow. Yet 
the only indications of advanced age were 
observable in increasing deafness and a slight 
huskiness of voice. 

Deafness was at this time a failing shared 
by I^ord Granville. Talking to either, it was 
desirable to raise the voice above conver- 
sational level Mr. Gladstone and Lord 
Granville, though separated by the breadth 
of the table s and both deaf, were able to make 
each other hear without exceptional effort in 
raising or modulating the voice. 

A notable thing about Mr. Gladstones 
face at that date, a marvel to the end, was 
the brightness of his eyes. They were fuller, 
more unclouded, than those of many a man 
under fifty. As he talked — and his talk was 
like the bubbling of an 
illimitable waterspring — 
the huskiness of his voice 
wore off. To everyone's 
delight, he did most of 
the talking. But there 
was not then — nor on any 
other of the occasions 
when I have been privi- 
leged to sit within the 
circle of his company was 
there — any appearance of 
his monopolizing conver- 
sation. As Du Maurier 
wittily said, he was "a 
most attractive listener. 13 

He had never been 
in Du Manner's com- 
pany before, but took 
to him with quick ap- 
preciation aud evident delight. Almost im- 
mediately after Du Maurier had been pre- 
sented to him, the conversation turned upon 
Homer. For ten minutes Mr. Glad- 
stone talked about Homer, with glowing 
glance and the deep, rich tones of voice that 
accompanied any unusual emotion. Homer, 
he insisted, evidently did not like Venus 
— Aphrodite, as Mr, Gladstone preferred to 
call her. He cited half-a-dozen evidences 




AN' ATTRACTIVE LISTENER, 



of Homer's distaste for a goddess usually 
fascinating to mankind. 

Pictures and artists he discussed, 

millais. with special reference to the 

picture shows at the time open 

in London. He said he always liked to go 

round a picture gallery in the company of an 

artist. 

u Artists," he said, "looking at a picture 
always see in it less to criticise, more to 
admire, than is possible to ordinary people. 
An artist sees more in a man's face than you 
or 1 can. 5 ' 

For many years preceding his retirement 
to Hawarden, Mr, Gladstone was accustomed 
to make tryst with Sir William Agnew in the 
early morning of the opening of the Royal 
Academy. Sir William once told me he 
insisted upon seeing everything, his critical 
remarks upon the varied pictures being singu- 
larly acute. At the date of this dinner 
Mr. Gladstone had had his portrait painted 
not less than thirty-five times. How many 
times he has been photographed is a sum 
beyond even his power of computation. He 
spoke with warm admiration and esteem of 
Millais. 

"I have had the good fortune/' he said, 
"to fall into the hands of a great artist, 
who made the minimum 
of demand upon my 
somewhat occupied 
time. Millais came to 
know me so well that 
sittings of five hours 
sufficed him for his most 
elaborate portrait, and 
this time I was able to 
give with real pleasure," 

" Is Millais then a 
charming companion 
when at his work ? " 

"Yes," said Mr, Glad- 
stone, "but not only 
because he talks. Just 
to watch him at his easel 
i> a delight. He throws 
his whole heart and soul 
into his canvas." 
Talking about Mr. Bright, he 
mr. rright. spoke regretfully of the careless- 
ness with which his old friend 
dealt with himself in the matter of health. 

*' Bright/' he said, emphatically, "did 
nothing he should do to preserve his health 
and everything he should not." 

If he had only been wise, and wise in 
time, there was, in Mr. Gladstone's opinion, 
no reason in the world why he should not 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



FROM BEHIND THE SPEAKER'S CHAIR. 



*99 



on that May Day, 1889, have heen alive, 
hale and strong. But he would never listen 
to advice about himself. Mr. Gladstone 
told a funny little story about his habits in 
this respect. Up to within a period of ten 
years preceding his death Mr. Bright had 
no regular, at least no recognised, medical 
attendant There was some mysterious 
anonymous person to whom he occasionally 
went for advice, and of whom he spoke 
oracularly. 

" But/ 1 said Mr, Gladstone, with that 
curious approach to a wink that sometimes 
varied his grave aspect, 
"he would never tell his 
name." 

Somewhere about the 
year 1879 Mr. Bright sur- 
prised Sir Andrew Clark 
by one morning appearing 
in his consultation -room. 
Sir Andrew, who knew all 
about his eccentricities 
in the matter of medical 
attendance, asked him 
how it was he came to 
see him. 

(t Oh t " said Mr. Bright, 
*' it's Gladstone. He never 
will let me rest about the 
state of my health." 

Long neglect had ir- 
retrievably wrought mis- 
chief, but Mr. Bright 
acknowledged the im- 
mense benefit derived 
from following the direc- 
tions of Mr. Gladstone's 
friend and physician, and nothing more was 
heard of the anonymous doctor. 

Mr. Gladstone seems to have 
slekpinc been always on the look-out for 

habits, opportunity to give a little friendly 

advice to Mr. Bright. One thing 

he strongly recommended was never to think 

of political affairs on getting into bed or 

immediately on waking in the morning. 

u I never do that/' Mr. Gladstone said. " I 
never allow myself to do it. In the most 
exciting political crises I absolutely dismiss 
current controversies from my mind when I 
get into bed. I will not take up the line of 
thought again till I am up and dressing in 
the morning. I told Bright about this. He 
said, 'That is all very well for you. But my 
way is exactly the reverse. I think over all my 
speeches when I am in bed. 1 " 

Like Sancho Panza, Mr. Gladstone had a 
great gift of sleep. Seven hours he insisted 



AN KARLY 
APPRE- 
CIATION. 




upon getting, "and,*' he added, with a smile, 
(t I should like to have eight. I detest 
getting up in the morning, and every morning 
I hate it just as sharply. But one can do 
everything by habit. When I have had my 
seven hours 1 sleep, my habit is to get out of 
bed" 

His memory was amazingly 
minute, more particularly for 
events that took place half a 
century ago- Oddly enough, 
w r here memory failed him was in the matter 
of human faces. This gift precious to, indis- 
pensable for, Princes was 
withheld from him. He 
told how somewhere in 
the late thirties there lived 
in London a man with a 
system, now sunk into 
oblivion, by which he 
brought electricity to bear 
in the direction of read- 
ing character. 

" There were three 
faculties he lold me 
wherein I was lacking," 
said Mr Gladstone. "One 
of them was that I had 
no memory for faces ; I 
am sorry to say it was, 
and remains, quite true/* 

It would have been in- 
teresting to hear what 
were the other two facul- 
ties absence of which the 
wise man detected. Mr. 
Gladstone did not say, 
But forgetfulness of faces 
he admitted and lamented, probably recognis- 
ing in the failing occasion of some personal 
misunderstandings. 

He talked a good deal about old 
Parliamentary days, lapsing into 
that gentle tone of charming 
reminiscence which on quiet 
Tuesday evenings or Friday nights sometimes 
delighted the House of Commons. One 
scene he recalled with as much ease and 
fulness of detail as if it had happened the 
week before. Its date was the 4th of June, 
1841. Sir Robert Peel had moved a resolu- 
tion of No Confidence in Her Majesty's 
Government, 

11 You were there," said Mr. Gladstone, 
pointing eagerly across the table to Lord 
Granville. "You had not left the Commons 
then. Didn't you vote in the division ? " 

Lord Granville smilingly shook his head, 
and to Mr, Gladstone's pained amazement 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



ITTLE FHIENPLV ADVICE, 



OLD DAYS 

IN THE 

COMMONS. 



3oo 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



positively could not remember what had 
taken place in the House of Commons on a 
particular night sped forty -eight years earlier* 
To Mr, Gladstone the scene was as vivid as 
if it had taken place at the morning sitting 
he had quitted to join us at dinner 
Naturally, as the issue of 
the pending division involved 
the fate of the Ministry, party 
passion ran high. Forces 
were so evenly divided that 
every member seemed to 
hold in the hollow of his 
hand the fate of the Minis- 
try. 

"The Whips of those 
days," he observed, parenthe- 
tically, * c somehow or other 
seemed to know more pre- 
cisely than they do now how 
a division would go. It was 
positively known that there 
would be a majority of one. 
On which side it would be was the only 
doubt. There was a member of the Opposi- 
tion almost at death's door. He was 
dead/' Mr. Gladstone added, emphatically, 
"except that he had just a little breath 
left in him. The question was, could 
he he brought to the House? The Whips 
said he must come, and so they carried him 
down. He was wheeled in in a Bath chair. 
To this day I never forget the look on his 
face, His glassy eyes were upturned, his 
jaws stiff. We, a lot of young Conservatives 
clustered round the door t seeing the Bath 
chair, thought at first they had brought down 
a corpse. But he voted, and the resolution 
which turned out Lord Melbourne's 
Government was carried by a majority 
of one." 

Mr Gladstone did not 

THii news- affect that indifference to 

PAPERS, the written word in the 

newspapers with which Mr. 
Arthur Balfour is equip[>ed. He had 
his favourites among the doilies and 
weeklies. Of the latter was for many 
years the Spec fa f or ^ a paper aban- 
doned, as stated in a published record 
of private conversation, because in 
its new manner, soured by the Home 
Rule controversy, it "touched him on 
the raw," 

For many years I contributed a 
London Letter to the columns of a 
Liverpool pa per , edited by my old 
friend and, as Mr. Purnblechuok used 
to describe himself in connection 




WHAT! + \GT REMF.\|[tKB CT ? fT WAS 
ONLY FOfcTV-EKJHT YEARS AfcO. 



HISTORY 

REPEATING 

ITSELF, 



with Pip, " early Benefactor/' now Sir Edward 
Russell Mr, Gladstone once surprised, and, 
I need hardly add, highly honoured me by 
saying that when in residence at Ha warden, 
the Liverpool Daily Post being the earliest 
paper to reach him, the first thing he turned 
to was the London Letter 

u Dear Mr. Lucy," he 
writes under date Jan. 14th, 
1890 — "I hope we may 
meet in town, and I can 
then speak to you more 
freely than I like to write re- 
specting a gentleman with 
whom I have been intimate 
for thirty years, and in whose 
uprightness of intention I 
fully believe, but who has 
exposed himself deplorably 
by his last effusion to the 
Times. I had read your com- 
parison with great interest 
where I read you daily, vu,, 
in the Liverpool Daily Post" 

The gentleness and lingering 
affection with which Mr. Glad- 
stone, e.ven in the white heat of 
personal political controversy, 
speaks of an old friend makes it possible to 
mention that the one he alludes to in this 
connection was the Duke of Argyll. The 
comparison which attracted him was attempted 
to be established between himself in this 
year 1890 and Sir Robert Walpole in 1742. 
At the period Mr. Gladstone wrote Mr 
Chamberlain had not finally made up his 
mind to throw in his lot with his old foe men 
the Tories. He dreamed a dream of what 




THE DUKE OP ASCVLL WRITES TO THE 

IVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



IROM BEHIND THE SPEAKER'S CHAIR. 



301 



he called "a National Party*" In the article 
to which Mr. Gladstone refers it was pointed 
out that a hundred and fifty years earlier nn 
almost exactly parallel case was set forth in 
English history. In 1742, at the close of a 
Ministry that had run a splendid career of 
twenty years, the factions arrayed against Sir 
Robert Walpole gained force sufficient to 
encourage his arch-enemies to strike the long 
impending blow. The Opposition of the 
day was divided into two parties diametrically 
opposed to each other in political opinion, 
just as were the Dissentient Liberals and 
the Conservatives of 1890, And as these 
latter were each all one in their hatred of 
Mr, Gladstone, so the manifold opposition 
of 1742 were united in animosity towards 
Walpole. 

" Hatred of Walpole,'* Macaulay writes, 
"was almost the only feeling common to 
them. On this one point they con centra led 
their whole strength. So much did they 
narrow the disputed ground, so purely 
personal did they make the question, that 
they threw out friendly hints to 
other members of the Administra- 
tion, and declared that they refused 
quarter to the Prime Minister alone*" 
By precision of coincidence the 
leading part in the cabal against 
Walpole was the then Duke of 
Argyll, whos± successor in the title 
a hundred and fifty years later took 
a leading part in the revolt against a 
greater than Walpole, 

In January, 1886, I was 
called upon to undertake 
the Editorship of the 
leading Liberal paper in 
In ordinary times the 
post is one involving incessant 
labour and grave responsibility, 
But at least the party whose views 
are represented are pretty fairly 
decided as to what those views are, 
and moderately united in giving 
them expression, Within a few 
weeks of my assuming the Editor- 
ship, the Daily Nnm was faced by the pro- 
blem of taking infant decision as to whether 
it would stand by Mr. Gladstone in the mat- 
ter of Home Rule, or whether it would join 
its colleagues of the Liberal Press which, 
without exception among London morning 
papers, went over to the other side. What 
happened is picturesquely set forth in the 
subjoined letter, one of the last, if not abso- 
lutely the last, written by Mr. Gladstone from 
the Premiers room in Downing Street :— 



u io, Downing Street, 

" Whitehall, March 5, '94. 
" Dear Mr, Luc \\~ Though under very 
great pressure I must thank you for your 
kind letter. 

" I must add a word to your statement of 
the solitude in which the Daily Nems took 
and gallantly maintained its post. I remember 
a day on which the Pail Mall Gazette under 
its clever, but queer, erratic Editor published 
an object-lesson of the field of battle on the 
Irish question- On one side were D,JV. and 
PAf.G. — on the other the rest 1 took my 
P.Af.G; drew a noose round the fighting 
figure, and with a long line with a \ at 
the end of it, carried it over to the other 
side, and by this verifying process placed the 
support of the P.A/.G. at hs true value, and 
left D.N. occupying absolutely alone its 
place of honour. I hope my account is 
intelligible. 

** I remain, 

" Faithfully yoursj 

t; YV. E. Gladstone," 



THE 
" DAILY 

NEWS," 

London. 




WHITING A POST-CARD. 



TIENT 
LIBERALS 



When the split in the Liberal 
Party occasioned by the Home 
,, Rule movement showed itself 
there was among other difficulties 
that of denominating the seceders from the 
main body of Liberals. The delicacy of the 
situation was increased by the natural desire 
of those concerned for the welfare of the 
Liberal Party not to widen the rift by use of 
opprobrious names. Otherwise there was a 
term ready to hand in the phrase applied 

"IVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



302 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



by the Northerners when the Southern States 
withdrew from the Union, After much 
cogitation 1 hit upon the phrase " Dissentient. 
Liberals," which, used in the leading columns 
of the Daily News, became generally adopted. 
The following memorandum from Mr. 
Gladstone, written to me during the progress 
of the General Election of 1886, shows how 
anxious was his care in the matter : — 

u I am really desirous that the newspapers 
should not go on representing as D.L. those 
who are distinctly L., like Talbot. If 
there is doubt about Sir H. Vivian, Villiers, 
and others, that ought rather to be given in 
our favour than against us. Further, the old 
division into Liberals and Tories ought to be 
regularly given, as well as the division into 
Irish and anti-Irish. At any rate, as soon as 
total L. overtops C, which at first it does not 
— but best, I think, without waiting for this." 
That phrase, "as soon as total L. overtops 
C," shows how sanguine he was up 
to the last that the country would 
respond to his appeal. As history 
records, the achievement was never 
completed, the poll finally made up 
showing the new House of Commons 
to consist of 317 Conservatives, 74 
Dissentient Liberals, 191 Liberals, 
and 84 Parnellites, leaving Mr. Glad- 
stone in a hopeless minority of 116. 
Even with the fresh sore- 
ness of the wounding, 
Mr. Gladstone habitually 
refrained from public re- 
sentment of the Thanes 
in 1886 fled from him. If 
occasion arose to answer them in 
debate, he was even more than 
usually courteous in his address. 
No one present will forget the 
touching scene that softened the 
acrimony of debate on the second 
reading of the Home Rule Bill. 
Mr. Austen Chamberlain found the 
opportunity to deliver a maiden 
speech, a flower of promise which 
has since richly budded. Mr. Glad- 
stone spoke on the twelfth night of 
the debate, following Mr. Balfour. 
Close at hand lay the momentous 
issue of the division. Behind him 
was the mass of argument to be 
answered, assertion to be confuted. 
Yet he did not forget the maiden 
speech of the young member, son of 
an old colleague now his most potent 
foeman. Commenting on the essay 
and its reception by the House, he 

Digitized by LiOOJ 



turned towards his old colleague, seated at the 
corner bench below the gangway, still on the 
Liberal side, and, with gracious bow, said, 
"It was dear and refreshing to a father's heart. ' 

There was one memorable occa- 

mr. cham- sion when Mr. Gladstone could 

berlain. not resist an invitation to fall 

upon and rend his severed friend. 
I am reminded of the incident by a post- 
card, here reproduced in facsimile, as illus- 
trating not only Mr. Gladstone's familiar use 
of this medium of communication, but his 
characteristic prevision in beginning at the 
very top in small handwriting, so that if the 
spirit moved him he might utilize every scrap 
of space. 

"One word of thanks, however hasty," he 
writes from 1, Carlton Gardens, April 12th, 
1892, "for the brilliant article. It had but 
one fault, that of excess with reference to 
the merits of the principal subject of it." 



GENEROUS 
COMPLI- 
MENT. 

who 






FACSIMILE OF OXE^O jiflp^ b£fr D STONE'S POST-CAUDS. 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



FROM BEHIND THE SPEAKER'S CHAIR. 



303 



The article alluded to appeared in the 
"Cross Bench " series of the Observer. It dealt 
with a memorable scene in the House on the 
8th of April, 1892, when, in the course of 
debate, Mr. Gladstone, rising without a note 
of preparation, fell upon Mr. Chamberlain 
and belaboured him with effect all the greater 
since the onslaught was free from slightest 
display of brutal force. It is difficult to 
say on which side of the House the joy of 
the sport was more acutely felt and un- 
reservedly displayed. There dwells still in 
the memory recollection of the scene in 
which the little comedy was set — the 
crowded House ; the laughing faces all turned 
upon the picturesque figure standing at the 
table ; Mr. Chamberlain gallantly trying to 
smile back on the benevolent visage turned 
upon him with just a flash of malice in the 
gleaming eyes ; and, that no touch might be 
missing to complete the perfectness of the 
scene, just behind Mr. Chamberlain, sitting 
well forward on the bench with folded arms, 
and on his face a mechanical grin of perhaps 
qualified appreciation, Mr. Jesse Collings, " the 
hon. member for Bordesley, the faithful 
henchman of my right hon. friend, who 
would cordially re-echo that or any other 
opinion." 

Immediately after the result of 
the General Election of 1886 
was made known, Mr. Gladstone 
betook himself to Hawarden and 
cheerfully entered on a quite new field of 
labour, his ordinary fashion of seeking recrea- 
tion. A letter dated December 18th, 1886, 
gives an interesting peep at him holiday 
making : — 
14 Dear Mr. Lucy, 

" Thanks for the proof. I read the article 
in the D.N, and thought it clever, enter- 
taining, and quite fair : the one in the P.M. 
Gazette, the secret of which I think I know, 
rather brutal. My ambition during my 
* holiday ' has been to give eighteen hours a 
week out of seventy, or one-fourth, to the 
prosecution of a study of which the Olympian 
Religion is a central part. But the O.R. of 
your articles is not mine. Mine is the religion 
of the Homeric Poems, and a totally different 
affair. For thirty years I have had this on 
hand. But of this appropriation I have fallen 
very far short. It has been my maximum. 

" You may like to have the enclosed, from a 
special correspondent of the Journal des 
Dibats. 

"Faithfully yours, 

"W. E. Gladstone." 



A 

"holiday 

TASK. 



The following letter, dated from 
Dollis Hill, April 28th, 1887, is 
interesting for its reference to 
Mr. Parnell. There was com- 
municated to the Daily News a 

poiitic\l re P ort of a statemen * made by 
Mr. Gladstone at a dinner given 
by Mr. Armitstead. To this he 
alludes in the postscript : — 
" Dear Mr. Lucy, 

" 1. Will you, if you think proper, print 
the enclosed letter from me as a reply to an 
Edinburgh Correspondent, and let it be 
posted ? 

"2. Mr. W- 



MR. 

PARNELL'S 

OFFER TO 

RETIRE 



- is an excellent man, but is 
behind the world. To the Eighty Club that 
I had long desired, and had made efforts for 
Liberal co-operation, outside the Irish 
question, but without effect. 

" A pointed effort of that kind was madp 
many weeks, nay, I think, several months, ago. 
" Yours faithfully, 

" W. E. Gladstone. 

" The Editor, Daily News. 

" The account given you of the Armitstead 
dinner goes beyond the mark, -and evidently 
mixes the writer's impressions with my state- 
ment, which was simply that Mr. P. offered 
to retire from Parliament if I thought it right 
to desire it. I spoke from recollection/' 

Paragraph two of this letter is a little 
obscure, suggesting accidental omission of a 
phrase. I give it as it was written. The 
fault is redeemed by the delightfully brief 

but perfect description of Mr. W , who 

is still alive, as excellent and as far behind 
the world as ever. I saw him looking 
reverently on from the fringe of the crowd of 
personal friends gathered in Westminster 
Hall round the bier of the lost Leader. 

Of all the touching episodes in 



IN WEST- 
MINSTER 
HALL. 



byOoOgle 



the progress from the death-bed 
at Hawarden Castle to the grave- 
side at Westminster Abbey, this 
last muster of old friends and colleagues 
round the coffin in Westminster Hall was 
the most pathetic, the grandest in its sim- 
plicity. When Eleanor, wife of Edward L, 
was borne from Lincoln to the same burial 
ground, her husband erected at various 
places Crosses to mark where she had rested 
on the way. For those present in West- 
minster Hall on Saturday, the 28th of May, 
1898, there will ever live among the storied 
recollections of the fane the remembrance 
that its roof for a while enshrined the coffin 
of Mr. Gladstone, making his last halt on 
the way to his final dwelling-place. 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



The Brotherhood of the Seven Kings. 

By L. T. Meade and Robert Eustace. 
IX.— THE BLOODHOUND. 




HE aspect of matters had now 
completely changed. Mme. 
Koluchy had at last put her- 
self under the power of the 
law, and her arrest at the worst 
was only a question of days. 
She had, it is true, a good start of her enemy, 
but an early wire to Scotland Yard would 
limit her movements by every conceivable 
device. Each railway terminus in England 
would be watched, as well as every port all 
over the country ; for in all probability she 
would try to make straight back to Italy, 
where, even if she were arrested for crimes 
committed in England, according to inter- 
national law the Italian authorities would not 
be bound to deliver her up to an English 
tribunal. 

Yes, we felt that circumstances were at 
last pointing to a crisis, and the arrest of the 
greatest criminal of her day was all but 
accomplished. Nevertheless, one knew that 
with such resources as Madame possessed 
she might surround herself with unexpected 
defences, for she had many friends in the 
country, and some of these moved in the 
highest and most influential circles. 

By an early train the two detectives, Du- 
frayer, and myself returned to town. Madame 
had, of course, avoided the railways, and had 
doubtless gone off by road on a pre-arranged 
plan with some of her confederates. 

On the way up, Tyler, who had been silent 
for some little time, leant across to the official 
inspector and said : " Ford, I shall put Miss 
Beringer on to this case now. I have more 
faith in her intuition and skill where a woman 
is to be hunted down than in any of my own 
men,, or yours either." 

The inspector smiled. 

"Just as you like/' he said. " I am well 
aware of Miss Beringer's skill. There is not 
a cleverer lady detective in the whole of 
London ; but, whether she is employed in 
the case or not, Madame cannot keep out 
of our clutches much longer. She has prob- 
ably got back to London by now, and when 
once there I'll swear she won't get out. 
What we have to do when we arrive is to go 
straight to Bow Street and get the warrant 
drawn up." 



by Google 



"You look terribly knocked up, Head,* 
said Dufrayer, glancing at me. 

" I have not quite got over the shock I 
received yesterday," was my reply ; " but my 
hand and arm are not nearly so painful as 
they were, and I am far too excited to think 
of rest at present. When I reach town I 
shall go straight off to Monkhouse, in 
Wimpole Street, and take his advice. My 
impression is that the arm will be all right in 
a week or so ; and now, happen what may, I 
intend to be in at the death." 

Dufrayer gave me one of his steady, long 
glances, but he did not shake his head or 
attempt to oppose me, for he knew that on 
this point my resolution was firm. 

On reaching London I left my companions, 
who promised to call at my house about one 
o'clock, and went straight off to see Monk- 
house. He dressed my arm and hand care- 
fully, said that I had had a miraculous escape, 
but he did not believe the injury was 
permanent. 

I then went home and waited anxiously 
for the arrival of Dufrayer and the police 
officers. They came soon after the hour 
arranged, having obtained the warrant for the 
arrest of Mme. Koluchy. To my surprise I 
saw that they were accompanied by a stranger, 
a tall, well-made girl of about five-and-twenty 
years of age. Tyler introduced her to me as 
Miss Anna Beringer, and added, in a whisper, 
that we were all right now, as we had secured 
her services. 

I glanced at her with some curiosity. She 
was a good-looking girl, with a keen, clever 
face. Her grey eyes were very bright, and 
all her features small and well formed, but 
there was a certain hardness about her lips 
which struck me even at the first glance. 
Those lips alone gave indication of her 
character, for there was nothing else in her 
appearance at all out of the common, and to 
an ordinary person she would appear simply 
as a bright, well-set-up young girl, with high 
spirits and a somewhat off-hand manner. 
Her usual expression was both frank and 
open, and her voice was very pleasant to 
listen to. 

" Mr. Tyler has already given me the out- 
line of the case "ishe. .said, turning to me. 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE SEVEN KINGS. 



3°5 



'* I know exactly what occurred yesterday* 
By the way, Mr. Head, I hope you are feel- 
ing better. Mme, Koluehy acted in a most 
dastardly way to- 
wards you, and you 
escaped as by a 
miracle. I need not 
say that Madame is 
very well known to 
me. It has b^en 
the most earnest 
wish of my life for 
several years now to 
be connected with 
her capture. I look 
upon such a capture 
as the blue ribbon 
of my profession. 
She shall not escape 
me now." 

As Miss Beringer 
spoke the hard lines 
round her mouth 
grew still harder, 
and the womanly 
element in her face 
faded out, giving 
place to a strong, 
masculine look of 
determination and 
resolution. 

11 Well/ 1 said 
Ford, H we have got 
the warrant at last, 
so it is all compara- 
tively plain sailing. 
The first thing is 
to go at once to 
Madam e^s house* 
She will scarcely 
have arrived there yet, but we can at least 
search the place and put a man on guard. 
Do you feel up to coming with us, Mr. 
Head ? " he added, turning to me. 

" Certainly, 3 ' I replied. 

" Well, then, we had better lose no time. 
I have a carriage at the door, and also a 
hansom," 

Miss Beringer, Dufrayer, and myself a 
moment later entered the landau which was 
in waiting for us, and the two detectives 
followed in the hansom. We all drove 
straight to Wei beck Street. As we ap- 
proached Madame's house we saw that it 
bore the usual marks of being shut up and 
comparatively deserted. The window-boxes 
were destitute of flowers, the blinds were 
down, the steps had not been cleaned, 
and an air of desolation hung over the 

Vol. *vi.-3& 



* But here 
someone at 



MISS HERIKliKR. 



place, Dufrayer and I ascended the steps 
and rang the bell. Ford, Tyler, and Miss 
Beringer remained in the street. 

" Suppose we can- 
not get in?" I said, 
after a moment's 
pause, for no one 
had yet come to 
answer our sum- 
mons- 

"With this war- 
rant in my posses- 
sion we can, if 
necessary, break 
down the door," 
replied Ford, laugh 
ing, 
comes 
last." 

We heard shuffl- 
ing footsteps 
ap proac h i n g, they 
reached the door, 
the chain inside was 
undone, and some 
holts drawn back. 
The door was then 
opened, and a tall 
old woman stood on 
the threshold. 

11 What do you 
want?" she said, 
speaking in a mum- 
bling voice. 

" We want Mme. 
Koluchy," said 
Ford ; " is she with- 
in?" 

The w o m a n 
started back quite 
perceptibly. When Ford came up and spoke 
to her I saw that she trembled all over. 
" Madame is not at home," she began. 
Turd inierruptrd hastily, 
" Look here, missus- I have a warrant here 
for the arrest of Mme. Koluehy, and 1 
demand an entrance, as 1 wish to search the 
house immediately." 

The woman drew back, apparently paralyzed 
with fear, and we immediately entered the 
hall in a body. 

"I tell you Madame is not here," she 
whimpered. u Madame has not been here 
since Saturday last," 

Ford pushed her aside unceremoniously, 
and we began our search. We began with 
the magnificent reception-rooms on the 
ground-floor* 

This waSitlw t^fef rdmoe I had been inside 

YERSITY OF MICHIGAN 




31 6 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



Miss Beringer heard the words, and once 
again she roused herself. Now she sprang 
to her feet. 

"I might have known it," she said. 
" Fools ! all of you ! How was it she 
escaped ? Did not you recognise her ? " 

" But Mme. Koluchy is dead," I said. 
" Come and look for yourself, if you do not 
believe me. Here she lies in this very room. 
You scarcely know what you are saying just 
now, after your own awful experience ; but at 
least Madame 
has not escaped, 
She can never 
harm anyone 
again — she has 
gone to her long 
account." 

Miss Beringer 
uttered a hollow 
laugh. 

"I am all 
right/' she said 
"It does not 
take me long to 
come back to 
my senses* Oh, 
what fools all 
you men are ! 
Madame knew 
what she was 
about when she 
immured me in 
that living grave, 
Do you call that 
Mme. Koluchy ? 
Come and look 
at her again." 

In the dim 
light of the 
laboratory we 
went and bent 
over the dead 
woman, I looked 
earnestly into 
the face, and 
then raised my 
eyes. Beyond 
doubt, poor 
Miss Beringer's 
senses had given way 
I gazed was Mme. 
feature was the same. 

*' I see you doubt me/ 4 said Miss Beringer, 
"Well, listen to my story,' 3 

She stood before us and began to speak 
eagerly. We all clustered round her. Never 
before had we listened to a tale of more 




> The woman on whom 
Koluchy, Feature for 



daring and unparalleled atrocity. 



gie 



" I told you, Mr. Head," she began, 4( that 
I had work which would keep me in town. 
So I had. From the time you went to 
Hastings yesterday I began to watch this 
house, I had all faith in the police officers 
you, Mr. Ford, had placed on duty, but I 
also felt certain that Madame, in her un- 
bounded resources, would find a means to 
return. I knew that, if such w r ere the case, 
it would need all a woman's keenest wit 
and intuition to foil her. She knew me as 

well as I knew 
her. It is true 
that she feared 
no man in Lon- 
don, but I do 
believe she had 
a wholesome 
dread of Anna 
Beringer, 

"Well, my 
watch began, 
and for the first 
hour or so noth- 
ing occurred, 
but as soon as 
it was dark I saw 
the old care- 
taker, who 
showed you over 
the house on the 
first occasion^ 
come out by the 
area door. I 
i m mediately 
followed her. 
She went straight 
to a shop in the 
Marylebone 
High Street — a 
small grocer's. 
She remained 
there for nearly 
half an hour. 
When she came 
out she was 
carrying a bag T 
quite a small 
one, which ap- 
parently con- 
tained some provisions. I followed her 
again, watching her closely, as I did so. 
Something about her walk first attracted my 
attention. The man on duty passed us as 
we went down Wei beck Street. I quickened 
my steps, and was in reality only two or three 
feet behind the woman whom I now strongly 
suspected to b« Mme. Koluchy herself, 

,,J ^iM^*RRrfte.fl pen gateof 



TURKED (1UICK AS LICilfTM ?((i ri'ON MR. 



THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE SEVEN KINGS. 



3o7 



" Can you show us the way to the labora- 
tories ? " I asked of her. 

She looked uneasy, but did not hesitate to 
comply. She pointed with her finger, and we 
went down a dim passage. The door of the 
outer laboratory was open, and we entered. 
There was another beyond this also with its 
door ajar. Both rooms were fitted up with 
every modern device, and excited my curiosity 
as well as envy. But search as we would we 
could get no clue to Madame's whereabouts. 

" She is not in the house, that is certain/' 
said Ford; "and now there is nothing what- 
ever for us to do but to keep a sharp watch 
in case she should venture to return." 

As he spoke my attention was attracted 
by the attitude of the old woman. Hitherto 
she had followed us about something like a 
snarling and ill-conditioned cur, who protested, 
but had not courage to attack. Now she 
came boldly into the room, and stood facing 
us, leaning up against the wall. Her eyes 
were dark and piercing, and shone out on 
us from beneath heavy, overhanging brows. 
Her mouth was almost toothless, and she 
had a nutcracker chin. 

" You won't find her," she muttered. 
" Ah, you may look as long as you like, but 
you'll never find her. The likes of her ain't 
for the likes of you. She ain't like other 
women. She's more spirit than woman, and 
the Evil One himself is a friend to her. You 
won't find her, never, never ! " 

She laughed in a hollow and exultant 
manner as she spoke. 

" Would it not be well to arrest this old 
crone ? " I said, turning to Ford. 

He shook his head. " I don't believe she 
has anything to do with the conspiracy," he 
said, dropping his voice to a whisper, 
" beyond the fact that she is Madame's paid 
servant ; but even if we wished to arrest her, 
we could not do so on vague suspicion. We 
can but watch her closely." 

" Then there is nothing more to be done 
at present ? " I queried, in a tone of dis- 
appointment. 

" As far as you are concerned, Mr. Head, 
there is nothing more," answered Tyler. " I 
should recommend you to go home and have 
a good rest We will let you know the instant 
anything happens." 

We parted outside the house, where an 
officer in plain dress was already standing on 
duty. Dufrayer said he would look me up 
in the evening, and the detectives and Miss 
Beringer went on their way. 

I hailed a hansom and returned to my 
own hQUSe, As I have already said, I was 



far too excited to rest. The old woman's 
words had affected me more strongly than I 
cared to allow, and as I paced up and down 
in my study, I could not help feeling any- 
thing but certain of the final result I knew 
that Dufrayer, Miss Beringer, Tyler, and Ford 
were each and all absolutely sure that Madame 
would soon be captured, but I was possessed 
by uneasy fears. In this moment of extremity, 
would not the great criminal bring all the 
strength of her magnificent genius to bear on 
the situation ? 

As I thought over these things I was 
suddenly possessed by a sense of comfort. 
This was caused by my recollection of Miss 
Beringer's face. Ordinary as that face looked 
to the casual observer, it was by no means 
so to those who watched it more narrowly. 
To such a watcher its strange look of power 
could not but appeal. So contemplated, the 
face was the reverse of pleasant — the hard- 
ness round the lips became its dominant 
feature. There was also an insistence in the 
grey eyes which might on emergency amount 
to absolute cruelty. But it was the strange 
look of strength which I now remembered, 
with a feeling of satisfaction. If Madame 
ever met her match, it would be in the 
person of that slight girl, for she pos- 
sessed, I knew well, a grip of her sub- 
ject which neither Ford nor Tyler, with 
all their intelligence and long practice, could 
own to. Miss Beringer could do work which 
they could not even attempt, for to her 
belonged the delicate intuition which is so 
essentially a woman's province. I longed to 
see her again, and also alone, that I might 
talk over matters more freely with her. Tyler 
had furnished me with her private address, 
and I now resolved to telegraph to her. I 
did so, asking permission to call upon her 
that evening. The reply came within an hour. 

" Don't come to-night, but expect me to 
call on you early to-morrow." 

Dufrayer came in as I was reading the 
telegram. 

" What have you got there ? " he asked, 

" A wire from Miss Beringer," I replied. 
I put it into his hand. 

" You are impressed, then, by our new 
detective? " he said, slowly. 

"Very much so," I answered. I gave a 
few of my reasons, and he favoured me with 
a grave smile. 

" I never felt so hopeful," he continued ; 
" we are in a position vre were never in yet. 
It is, as Tyler says, merely a question of days. 
Where so many are on the watch, Madame 
cannot long escape u? t " 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



3°S 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



u Remember that the person we want to 
get is Mme + Koluchy," I answered, ''and do 
not be too sure* For my part, I shall never 
be certain of her until she is absolutely our 
prisoner." 

He did not remain w T ith me much longer^ 
and I spent the night as best I could 

Between ten and eleven o'clock on the 
following morning Miss Beringer arrived 
She entered my room quickly, came close to 
my side, and fixed her eyes on my face. 




SHB CAME CLOSK To MY SIDE* 

I was startled by the change in her appear- 
ance. The grey eyes had a curious bright 
glitter in them, and her face was pale and 
drawn. 

II Yes, Mr. Head," she said, as she took the 
chair offered her ; " these cases take it out of 
me. When once on the track, I never rest 
day or night I have never failed yet If I 
did, I think it would kill me." 

She shivered as she spoke, and her thin 
lips were drawn back to show her teeth. She 
had somewhat the expression of a tigress 
about to spring. .^.^ ^ G 00 gl e 



" You have news. Miss Beringer?" I said; 
11 1 hope good news ? " 

" I have news," she replied, gravely, "and 
I trust it is good. It was because of what I 
am about to tell you that I was unable to 
call to see you last evening. Are you strong 
enough and well enough to go down at once 
with Ford to Hastings?" 
"Certainly," I replied. 
" I will give you my reasons for asking 
you to do so. There is a yacht cruising off 
the coast It is said 
to belong to a Captain 
Marchant I have had 
my suspicions from 
the first that it is sub- 
sidized by Madame. 
It was on account of 
these suspicions that I 
went to Hastings last 
, night." 

"To Hastings?" I 
said. 

" Yes ; I spent 
several hours of the 
night and evening in 
one of the low quarters 
of the town by the 
fish-market There is 
no doubt that several 
members of the gang 
are hiding in the 
neighbourhood of 
Hastings, and their 
object is, of course, to 
get to the yacht. It is 
all- important to take 
immediate steps to 
prevent this." 

"But how could 
you find out about the 
yacht in the first in- 
stance ? " I asked 
^.- r* :jm ,-X " I obtained a slight 

clue," she replied, * no 
matter how obtained, 
and just when your telegram reached me 
was on my way to Hastings, disguised 
as a fisher - woman. I possess many 
disguises in my rooms, and am seldom 
taken aback when I want to act a good 
part I went third-class to Hastings, and 
immediately visited the vicinity of the fish- 
market I have a friend there, a fish- 
wife, who does not know my real character, 
and who is always glad to see me, I can act 
the part admirably* and when I asked her 
to accompany me to a Jarge gin-palace, she 
was all too willing, rojTi was in reality 
"IVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE SEVEN KINGS. 



309 



following two men, but she knew nothing 
of that While these men were drinking at 
the bar, I drew near and was fortunate 
enough to hear a few words of their conversa- 
tion. They spoke for the most part in Italian, 
which I happen to know. The name of 
Captain Marchant's yacht, the Snowflakc^ 
dropped from the lips of one. There was 
also a woman mentioned, but not by name. 
The Snowflake was waiting for the woman. 
Meanwhile, the men were hiding in an old 
disused Martello tower on the Pevensey 
Marshes. This I learned scrap by scrap, 
but it was enough for my purpose. I returned 
to town by the first train this morning. Ford 
and Tyler have received all the information 
I have just told you, and are certain that the 
yacht belongs to Madame. Ford and Tyler 
go to Hastings by the twelve o'clock train. 
And now the question is, can you go with 
them, and will Mr. Dufrayer be induced to 
accompany you ? Knowing as much as you 
must do about the Seciety, your help will be 
invaluable." 

" I will go," I said, " and I will send a wire 
to Dufrayer." 

" Very well," she replied ; " it is scarcely 
eleven o'clock yet — you will find the 
detectives at Charing Cross at noon." 

" But won't you come with us ? " I said. 

She turned a little pale. 

" No," she answered, " my work obliges me 
to remain in town." 

" Do you mind telling me what your next 
step is?" I asked. 

" I would rather not," she answered, " for 
even here walls may have ears." 

As she spoke she glanced round her with a 
nervous flash in her eyes, which left them 
almost as soon as it appeared. 

" I never confide my plan of operations to 
anyone in advance," she continued. " I have 
much to do and not a moment to lose. I 
believe now, between us, Madame has little 
chance of escape ; but one false step, the 
smallest indiscretion, would be fatal. Good- 
bye, Mr. Head. I am glad that you have 
confidence in me." 

" The utmost," I rpplied, as I wrung her 
hand. 

A moment later she left the house. I 
packed a few things, sent a wire to Dufrayer, 
and at the right moment drove off to Charing 
Cross, where I met my friend, and also the two 
detectives. We took our seats in the train 
and it moved out of the station. We 
happened to have the carriage to ourselves, 
and Ford was in such a state of excitement 
that he could scarcely sit still. 

Digitized by ^OOQ IC 



" Did I not say that Miss Beringer was the 
one person in all London to help us ? " he 
cried. " She is like a bloodhound when she 
scents the prey, and never lets go of the 
scent From what she tells me, there is 
little or no doubt that most of the gang are 
hiding down in the Pevensey Marshes, and 
have taken possession of one of the old, dis- 
used Martello towers. There are a good 
many of them along the south coast." 

Dufrayer asked one or two questions, and 
Ford continued : " That's a cute idea about 
using the old tower, and I believe the one 
which we are to watch is No. 59. It stands 
on the beach by the marshes of Pevensey 
Bay. The gang are only waiting till the 
steam yacht now being closely watched can 
take them off. Of course, we could quite 
easily go straight to the tower and catch those 
members of the gang who are there, but we 
want Mme. Koluchy, and my impression is, 
tlyU she is quite certain to come down to- 
night or to-morrow. Our present work, 
however, will be to watch the tower day and 
night, so that when she does arrive we can 
catch her. Miss Beringer is under the 
strong impression that at present Madame is 
hiding in London. We may have a rough 
and tumble with the gang when it comes to 
the point, but I have taken steps to secure 
lots of assistance." 

On arriving at Hastings station we were 
met by a couple of Tyler's agents. 

" Has anything fresh occurred ? " asked 
Ford, as we alighted. 

" Nothing," answered one of the men, 
" but there is no doubt that several members 
of the gang are in No. 59 tower, and the 
steam yacht has drawn off down Channel." 

" Just as I expected," said Ford ; " well, 
the sooner we mount guard the better. We 
will start as soon as it is dark." 

The next few hours we spent in making 
preparations. It was arranged that we should 
go as if we intended shooting wild duck. 
This would give us the excuse of carrying 
guns, which we knew we might possibly want 
for bigger game if the gang offered any 
serious resistance. 

At six o'clock our little band, consisting of 
Dufrayer, Ford, Tyler, myself, and a couple 
of policemen in plain clothes, drove west- 
wards out of the town to a lonely part of the 
shore. Here a boat awaited us, and, entering 
it, we pulled out into the bay. The moon 
had risen, and we could see the row of 
Martello towers dotted along the beach, and 
the dark waste of the marshes behind them. 

Ford steered , and, after an hour's hard 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



3io 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



pulling, turned the boat's head towards the 
beach, where one of the dykes ran into the 
marshes from the sea. This we silently 
entered, and in a few moments the tall bul- 
rushes that grew on either side completely 
concealed us. Ford raised his hand, and we 
quietly shipped our sculls, 

"That's where they are," he whispered, 
pointing to one 
of the towers 
about two 
hundred yards 
off, " There is 
not a light 
visible, but they 
are there and 
no mistake. 
Now, what we 
have to do is 
this. We will 
leave the boat 
here, and crawl 
up under cover 
of the shingle 
ridge. We shall 
be quite close 
to the tower 
there, and we 
ran lie in wait, 
unseen by the 
gang. How 
Madame will 
come, if to- 
night at all, by 
boat or other- 
wise, it is im- 
possible to say ; 
but at any rate, 
whenever she 
arrives she can- 
not escape us. 
There is the 
steam yacht 
now/'he added, 
pointing out to 
sea. 

I looked up 
and saw two 
red and green 
lights moving slowly along a mile or so from 
the shore. 

Taking our guns and the provisions and 
flasks we had brought with us, we crept 
through the rushes and out on to the shingle, 
till we were within twenty yards of the tower. 
So close were we that I could see every 
detail. The ladder leading up to the door 
of the tower half-way up the wall was plainly 
visible j as was ? also, the old, rusty twenty- 
Dig iHzed by LiOOQ KT 




four-pounder, pointing uselessly out to sea. 
The tower itself was almost in ruins, and 
here and there the brickwork of the walls 
showed through the stucco which had worn 
off by time. 

It was a calm night, and only the wash of 
the sea broke the stillness. I stretched my- 
self on the rough, loose boulders and shingle, 

and laid my 

gun by my side. 

Hour after hour 
crept by. The 
vigil we were 
all keeping 
was sufficiently 
strange and ex- 
citing to keep 
us wakeful and 
attentive. Pre- 
sently a night 
breeze arose 
and sighed 
among the bul- 
rushes in the 
marshes behind 
us. But all 
within the 
tower was ab- 
solutely silent 
— not a light 
showed through 
the chinks of 
windows, not a 
footfall came to 
our ears. From 
where I lay, I 
could watch the 
lights of the 
yacht move to 
and fro in the 
black darkness. 
The slow hours 
dragged on, and 
still nothing 
happened. At 
last the dawn 
began to break 
— it grew 



TtfATS WHERE THF.Y ARE, HE WINSFEHED* 



brighter each 
moment. I was just turning towards Ford 
for our signal to go back to the boat> when 
suddenly I saw him leap up, raise his gun, 
and a loud report rang out on the still morn- 
ing air. I leapt to my feet also, as did the 
others. The little w + indow of the tow T er 
opened, and two revolver shots rang through 
it as Tyler, Dufrayer, and three of the men 
rushed up the ladder. I followed them 
immediateljtJfl^iPial^ftftliP know what this 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



A SHEEPDOG COMPETITION. 



3** 




THE SHEEP PARSING OVE1 THB MOUND OF EARTH. 

sheep passing in a body through the narrow 
entrance. It looks peaceable enough, but 
the photograph could not possibly show the 
amount of insistency exerted by some of the 
dogs in the competition before they manage 
to get the leader of the sheep to pass 
through. With the shepherd in front and 
the dog behind, they get through, however, 
and after being collected, continue round 
the curve. Then looms up before the 
flock the third obstacle on the course, a 
mound of earth extending wholly across 
the course, and over 3ft. wide. This tries 
the temper of the sheep to the utmost. 
They make vain efforts to go around the 
obstruction instead of over it, but the dog 
knows his busi- 
ness, and keeps 
them on the course 
until their very 
noses are against 
the mound. Some 
of the dogs failed 
to keep the sheep 
together in this 
place, and lost 
their chance of a 
prize thereby* But 
in the competition 
shown in our illus- 
tration, the four- 
footed guide got 
his leader started, 
and all was well. 
Note how he let 
the hind sheep 
follow and devoted 

Vol. xvj.^-4t, 



his earnest atten- 
tion to the leaders 
keepingthem in the 
straight and narrow 
path to victory. 

The last stage 
in the competition 
is shown on this 
and the next page, 
and the pictures 
and sheep may 
possibly move 
rapidly enough to 
tell their own 
story. The illustra- 
tion below shows 
the sheep passing 
in front of the 
pavilion ; and the 
reader may note 
how perfectly the 
flock are obeying 
the silent commands of the dog as he 
marshals them before the eagle eyes of 
the judges. Still are the judges on the 
look-out for bites. Still on their little 
tablets do they mark merits and demerits in 
the dog that the ordinary onlooker never sees. 
And still for two or more hours do they sit 
and watch the long processions of sheep go 
past, laughing at the stupidity of some com- 
petitors, and admiring the skill of others with 
the peculiar satisfaction of the expert. They 
never lift their eyes off until the sheep are 
driven into the arrival pen, where we may 
see them entering in the illustration ; and 
then, when all is over, they compare their 
marks and pick the winner Meanwhile, 




by do 



THE SMEEp PASSING IN FRONT OF THE GRAND STAND, 

Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



IC 



1 



312 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



I thought a moment, and then wrote : 
" Stay in Welbeck Street until one of us comes 
to you. Important. Danger if you stir" 

Ford's eyes glittered as he read my words. 
He attached the little note deftly to the neck 
of one of the birds. 

" There, off you go," he exclaimed ; " it's 
lucky birds can't talk." 

He tossed the pigeon into the air, the bird 
rose rapidly in gradually increasing circles, 
and then shot off in a straight line for the 
north, and so was lost to view bearing my 
message to Mme. Koluchy. 

As the pigeon darted up into the air, I 
heard one of the prisoners utter an exclama- 
tion, and turn to his fellow. This action of 
ours had evidently taken him completely by 
surprise. The man at whom he looked made 
no reply, even by a glance, but folding his 
arms across his breast stood motionless as if 
at attention. A glance showed me all too 
plainly that, desperate as the men were, they 
were at least true to Madame. Even death 
by torture, did such await them, would not 
induce any one of the Brotherhood to betray 
their chief. They were all well dressed, and 
had the apearance of gentlemen. They took 
their apparently hopeless fate with stoicism, 
and did not attempt any escape. 

By this time the sun had well risen, and a 
glorious morning had chased away the gloom 
of the night. Placing our prisoners in the boat, 
we pulled round to a lower part of the shore. 
Here a trap met us by appointment, and in 
less than an hour we were all on our way to 
London. Success had at last rewarded our 
efforts. We had secured Madame's gang, 
and now it would be an easy feat to make 
Madame herself our prisoner. 

Ford had wired to Miss Beringer to meet 
us at the station, and he whispered to me 
from time to time as we ran up to town his 
keen sense of satisfaction. 

"Trust Miss Beringer not to have been 
idle while we were busy down here ! " he 
exclaimed. "She may probably be able to 
account for the way in which Mme. Koluchy 
has got back to her house. Ah, we have 
done for Mme. Koluchy at last. She has 
got the message of the carrier pigeon by now, 
but she little guesses who are coming to pay 
her a visit." 

He laughed as he spoke. The traih began 
to approach its destination, and slowed down 
preparatory to coming into the station. 

"The first thing to be done," said Ford, 
" is to take our prisoners to Bow Street and 
have them formally charged, then we will all 
go and visit Madame in a party. Ah ! here 



we are : I'll just jump out first, and have a 
look round for Miss Beringer." 

He was the first to spring on to the plat- 
form, but look as he would he could not find 
the lady detective. He came back presently 
to the rest of us with a crestfallen expression 
of face. 

" It's odd," he said, " but it only shows 
that she's precious busy with our business. 
In all probability we will find her in the 
vicinity of the house. Now, then, to look 
after the prisoners." 

We took our men in a couple of cabs to 
Bow Street, and having seen them safe in the 
cells, drove straight to Madame's house. 
We had our last great capture to make in 
order to complete our work. 

As we neared the house a strange and 
almost ungovernable excitement took posses- 
sion of me. Dufrayer and the two detectives 
were also silent. This was no time for 
speech. My heart beat hard and fast — the 
stirring events of the last twenty-four hours 
had kept my brain going at fever heat, and, 
weak after the shock I had recently under- 
gone, the strain began to tell. Once or 
twice I had to shake myself as a man in a 
dream. Truly, it was almost impossible to 
believe that in a few moments now Mme. 
Koluchy, the invincible, the daring, the all- 
powerful, would be our prisoner. 

We drew up at last at the well-known 
entrance, and spoke a few words to the man 
on duty. 

" Oh, yes," he replied, " it's all right, and 
there's little or no news. The old woman has 
gone out once or twice to a shop to get some 
food, but no one has entered the house." 

"What about Miss Beringer? Has she 
been here ? " I asked. 

"She was here yesterday evening," he 
answered, " but I've not seen her since." 

Telling him to be in readiness without 
informing him of our convictions, we knocked 
loudly and rang imperiously at the door. After 
a very short delay the same old woman ap- 
peared. She wore a sort of night-cap with a 
deep frill and her piercing eyes confronted us 
from under the shaggy brows. She would only 
now vouchsafe to open the door a few inches. 

The place showed dimly in the half light, 
for every blind was down and every shutter 
up. We could not even see the bent form of 
the old woman distinctly. 

" Now, look here," said Ford, " your 
mistress is in this house somewhere. We 
happen to know it for an absolute fact. Will 
you take us to her or not, for find her we 
will?" 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



THE BROTHERHOOD OP THE SEVEN KINGS. 



313 



The woman gave a low laugh, suppressed 
as soon as uttered. 

"You may look all you can," she ex- 
claimed, "but Madame is not here. You 
are welcome to search the house to your 
hearts 1 content." 

After saying the last words she mumbled 
something more to herself, and then shuffled 
off down the passage. 

We all entered the house. 

" Now, then/' said Ford, " we'll search from 
cellar to garret, and well start this time 
downstairs." 

We descended to the basement, and made 
a careful search through the various domestic 
offices, until once more we found ourselves in 
the first of Mme, Koluchy's magnificent 
laboratories. Ford switched on the electrics, 
and we looked around us, The place was in 
perfect order, but a curious ethereal distillate 
familiar to my nostrils hung in the air. I 
could not account for this at the time, 
although it filled me with a vague fear. We 
went on into the second laboratory, which 
was also in order, but was pervaded even 
more strongly by the same smell. At the 
further end of this room was a very low 
doorway studded with nails and iron 
bands. It looked as if it led into some 
cellar, and I suddenly remembered that 
we had not ex- 
plored beyond its r "™" ~" 

portals on the oc- 
casion of our first 
visit* The old 
woman had fol- 
lowed us into the 
laboratories, keep- 
ing well in the 
background. Ford, 
who seemed to 
observe the door 
at the same 
moment that I 
had, turned upon 
her eagerly. 

"Where is the 
key of this door ? " 
he said, 

" I don't know," 
she answered, 

**Go and find it 
immediately." 

" My mistress 
keeps the key of 
that room, and 
until she returns 
you can T t get in," 
was the low reply. 

Vol xvi.-40. 



" We'll soon sec about that," cried Ford. 

He turned to one of his men. 

"Just go out," he said, 1( and tell the man 
on duty outside to get me an axe and crow- 
bar, and bring them here as soon as possible. 
Hurry as fast as you can, Johnson ; there's 
not a moment to lose," 

The man left u% immediately, 

u I think we shall find a clue at the other 
side of this locked door t " continued Ford, 
glancing at me, li I hope Johnson will look 
sharp." 

In less than a quarter of an hour the man 
returned with the necessary implements. 

" Martin and I went together to fetch 
them," he said ; ** I'm sorry I could not be 
back sooner," 

Ford seized the axe, and after a few smash- 
ing blows over the lock inserted the bar and 
the door burst open. He stepped inside 
immediately, but as he did so he started 
back and a look of horror spread over his 
face. We all rushed in, 

"Good God, we are too late!" he cried, 
"She has escaped us." 

( * Escaped? How?" I said, pushing 
forward, 

" By death ! " he answered. 

He went forward and knelt on the floor of 
the room. In the dim light I could plainly 




by C00glc„ M 



5^ 

Original from 



^-fc'i-^j 



3*4 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



see the body of a woman. Ford struck a 
match and held it close to the face. It was 
the body of Mme. Koluchy. Yes, there she 
lay. The well-known face, in all its magnifi- 
cent beauty, wore now the awful repose of 
death. Beside her was a small hypodermic 
syringe, and also an open bottle containing 
some clear solution. From that open bottle 
had issued the smell which pervaded the 
outer and the inner laboratory. 

For fully a moment we all gazed down at 
the dead woman in absolute silence. The 
sudden discovery had struck us dumb. How 
she had managed to obtain access to the 
house when it had been so closely watched 
was indeed a mystery. But after all it 
mattered nothing now. The end had come. 
A fit end to such a life as hers had been. 
We withdrew from the semi-darkness of the 
room into the outer laboratory. Dufrayer 
glanced round him. 

" 1 wonder where the old woman can be ! " 
he exclaimed. 

" She was with us a moment ago," I 
answered. " Is she not here now ? " 

" No, she has gone back into her own 
haunts, most likely. Had we not better call 
her? It is impossible that Madame could 
have got into the house without her assist- 
ance." 

" I will go and have a look for her," said 
Tyler. He left the laboratory, and we heard 
him moving about the house, his footsteps 
echoing as he went. He presently came 
back. 

" She is not in any of the kitchens," he 
said. " Perhaps she has gone upstairs — it 
does not matter much now, does it ? " 

" No," I answered, and then once more we 
were all silent, too stunned to utter many 
words. I never saw anyone look so utterly 
crestfallen as Ford. 

"To think that Mme. Koluchy should 
have done us at the very end ! " he exclaimed 
more than once; " but it was like her ; yes, it 
was like her." 

" The message tthich the carrier pigeon 
brought meant evidently more to her than 
lay on the surface," I remarked. "She saw 
that she was hemmed in on every side, and 
was not the woman to be taken alive." 

" Well, our search has come to an un- 
looked-for end," said Ford, again ; " but I 
do wonder," he added, "where Miss Beringer 
can be. It is very odd that we have not 
heard or seen anything of her." 

Just then Dufrayer spoke. 

" Hark ! " he cried, " what is that ? " 

We all stood still and listened. Far away, 



as if from some great distance, we heard a 
muffled cry. Again and again it was repeated. 
So faint was the sound that it seemed to be 
away out in the street. 

" What on earth can it be ? " said Ford, 
looking round him anxiously. 

We moved softly round the laboratory, 
fearing to disturb the silent figure that lay in 
the awful repose of death. Again and once 
again we heard the cry. We stopped now 
and then to listen more closely. At last we 
reached a point where it seemed louder than 
anywhere else. I lay down and applied my 
ear to the stone flags. 

" It is here ! " I cried, in intense excite- 
ment, " just beneath us. Listen ! " 

Yes, it was now unmistakable — the sound 
came from beneath our feet. 

"There is a cellar beneath this," I said ; 
" someone is immured here." 

We searched rapidly for any sign of an 
entrance, but searched in vain. 

Once again the cry was repeated, but now 
it was as faint as that which might come 
from the throat of an infant. 

"There is someone under here," said 
Dufrayer, in a tone of the greatest excitement. 
" We must smash the flagstone immediately." 

Ford and Tyler both seized the crowbar. 
In a few moments they had loosened the 
stone, levered it up, and turned it over. As 
they did so, I perceived that there was a 
secret spring underneath, and had we looked 
long enough we could have removed the 
stone without the help of the crowbar. The 
moment it was turned up a breath of intensely 
cold air greeted us, and we saw immediately 
beneath our feet a dark, circular hole. A low 
moan came up from the darkness. I gently 
lowered down the crowbar ; it rested on 
something soft. 

Our excitement now was intense. Taking 
off my coat I lowered myself through the 
hole, and holding on by my hands to the 
edge of the hole, my feet at last touched 
the solid ground. The cold that surrounded 
me was so intense that I almost gasped for 
breath. In what infernal region was I find- 
ing myself? I let go and, striking a match, 
looked round. Good God ! a woman lay in 
this fearful dungeon ! In another moment I 
had raised her, and as her face caught the 
light I saw at a glance that it was Miss 
Beringer. The others quickly lifted her out, 
and I sprang up beside them. A pair of 
steel handcuffs were on her wrists. She was icy 
cold from the awful chill of that subterranean 
chamber, that at first she looked like one dead. 
Her moulh was torn and bgr hands swollen. 



THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE SEVEN KINGS. 



3*5 



When she was brought up into the warmer 
air she lay to all appearance unconscious for 
several moments. Dufrayer quickly took a 
flask from his packet, poured out some 
brandy, and put it to her lips. At first she 
could not swallow, then, to our great relief, 
a few drops went down her throat. She 
sighed audibly and opened her eyes. When 
she did so she stared with a dazed expression 
all round. In less than a moment, however, 
full consciousness returned, a fierce light of 



"Mme. Koluchy is dead!" I answered* 
thinking that she had not yet recovered her 
senses, 

** But she is not ! " she answered, in a 
passionate voice, "Take the old woman." 

Ford turned to one of his men. 

" Fetch her in," he said. 

M I have had a good search for her already," 
said Tyler, "and could not find her in any of 
the lower regions.' 1 

He spoke in a whisper, and I do not think 




+l "hath you cot hek? 1 she. askied." 



understanding shone in the depths of her 
eyes, and she sat up, 

"Have you got her ?" she asked, gazing 
wildly round. 

11 We have, Miss Beringer, but not alive," I 
answered. "Now tell us how it is you are 
here- Tell us what has happened, if you 
possibly can," 

" But the old woman — Mme. Koluchy — 
have you got her?" 



Miss Beringer heard him, She was lying back 
again with closed eyes, lord's man rushed 
out of the room, to return in a few moments. 
i: I have been all over the house," he said, 
11 and cannot find the woman high or low. 
She is not here— she must have gone out when 
Martin and I were away fetching the axe and 
crowbar. I remember now, we left the door 
open — we had no thought of anything else in 

our mwmi OF MICHIGAN* 



3i6 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



Miss Beringer heard the words, and once 
again she roused herself* Now she sprang 
to her feet 

"I might have known it," she said. 
" Fools ! all of you ! How was it she 
escaped ? Did nor you recognise her?" 

" But Mme. Koluchy is dead," I said. 
" Come and look for yourself, if you do not 
believe me. Here she lies in this very room. 
You scarcely know what you are saying just 
now, after your own awful experience ; but at 
least Madame 
has not escaped. 
She can never 
harm anyone 
again — she has 
gone to her long 
account" 

Miss Beringer 
uttered a hollow 
laugh. 

"I am all 
right," she said. 
"It does not 
take me long to 
come back to 
my senses. Oh, 
what fools all 
you men are ! 
Madame knew 
what she was 
about when she 
immured me in 
that living grave, 
]>o you call thai 
Mme. Koluchy ? 
Come and look 
at her again." 

In the dim 
light o f t h e 
laboratory we 
went and bent 
over the dead 
woman. I looked 
earnestly into 
the face, and 
then raised my 
eyes. Beyond 
d o u b t, poor 
Miss Be ringer's 
senses had given way. The woman on whom 
I gazed was Mme. Koluchy, Feature for 
feature was the same, 

" I see you doubt me," said Miss Beringer. 
*' Well, listen to my story/ 1 

She stood before us and began to speak 
eagerly. We all clustered round her. Never 
before had we listened to a tale of more 
daring and unparalleled atrocity. 




11 1 told you, Mr. Head," she began, h * that 
I had work which would keep me in town. 
So I had* From the time you went to 
Hastings yesterday I began to watch this 
house. I had all faith in the police officers 
you, Mr. Ford, had placed on duty, but I 
also felt certain that Madame, in her un- 
bounded resources 3 would find a means to 
return. I knew that, if such were the case, 
it would need all a woman's keenest wit 
and intuition to foil her. She knew me as 

well as I knew 
her. It is true 
that she feared 
no man in Lon- 
don, but I do 
believe she had 
a wholesome 
dread of Anna 
Beringer, 

"Well, my 
watch began, 
and for the first 
hour or so noth- 
ing occurred, 
but as soon as 
it was dark I saw 
the old care- 
taker, who 
showed you over 
the house on the 
first occasion, 
come out by the 
area door. I 
i m m ed iately 
followed her. 
She went straight 
to a shop in the 
Marylebone 
High Street — a 
small grocer's. 
She remained 
there for nearly 
half an hour. 
When she came 
out she was 
carrying a bag, 
quite a small 
one, which ap- 
parently con- 
tained some provisions. I followed her 
again, watching her closely, as I did so. 
Something about her walk first attracted my 
attention. The man on duty passed us as 
we went down Welbeck Street. I quickened 
my steps, and was in reality only two or three 
feet behind the woman whom I now strongly 
suspected to be Mm 'j. Koluchy herself. 

"J^iifi^wtaftrtte.ff* 11 gateof 



KHF, rrKNKD (>ruk a^ i.h;htniv^ rrn\ mk. 



THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE SEVEN KINGS. 



3*7 



the area, and as I was about to lay my hand 
on her shoulder, she turned quick as lightning 
upon me, and dashed into my face a liquid 
which must have been a solution of the 
strongest ammonia. The effect was instan- 
taneous. I fell back gasping for breath, and 
unable to utter a sound. She well knew 
what the effect of the ammonia would be, 
causing a sudden paralysis of the glottis, 
which would prevent my uttering a word for 
a couple of moments. Before I could 
recover myself, she had flung her arm around 
me, had dragged me down the area steps and 
into the house. The moment we got within 
she slipped a pair of handcuffs on my wrists 
and also gagged me. I was so paralyzed by 
the effect of the ammonia that I did not 
attempt to make the smallest struggle until 
too late. When she had gagged and bound 
me, she dragged me down a passage and into 
this laboratory where we are now standing. 
She then laid me on the floor and tied me 
down securely. When she had done this, 
she looked down at me and smiled a smile 
of devilish cruelty. 

" * Yes, Miss Beringer,' she said, ' you are 
a smart woman, the smartest with one excep- 
tion in all London. You are interested in 
me — I am about to gratify that interest' 

" She left me for a few moments, and 
presently returned dragging something heavy 
after her. Horror of horrors, it was a 
woman's dead body ! I could scarcely 
believe the evidence of my own senses. She 
laid the body on the floor, and began to 
dress it in some of her clothes. Having 
done this, and having arranged it in the 
attitude of one who might have suddenly 
fallen and died, she came up to me 
again. 

" ' Two years ago,' she said, speaking 
slowly, and bending her face to within about 
a foot of mine, * there lived a woman in 
Naples who was in every respect my 
double. She was like me in each feature, in 
height, proportion, even to the expression of 
the face. She was a peasant woman, but so 
strong was her resemblance to me, that twice 
the Neapolitan police arrested her, believing 
her to be me. They, of course, discovered 
their mistake, and she quickly recovered 
her liberty. The woman died, and though 
to all appearance she was buried, it 
was but a mock funeral. For I had been 
watching her, and I felt that in extremis 
she would be of the utmost use to me. I 
offered the woman's husband a large sum 
for her body. It was conveyed to my house 

Goo 



in Naples, no matter how. The husSand 
received his money, but in order that no 
tales might arise he was quickly afterwards 
put out of the way by one of my confederates. 
I kept the body at a very low temperature, 
and when I came to England in my own 
yacht, brought it with me. Since then it has 
remained in a frozen chamber beneath the 
floor of the inner laboratory, thus retaining 
its likeness, as under such circumstances it 
would perpetually. 

" 'The time has come when I must use my 
double in order to effect my own escape. 
The most vindictive tribunal in the world 
will pause at the edge of the grave. My 
enemies will suppose that I am dead, and I 
shall escape from their power, for the like- 
ness to me is so perfect, that detection can- 
not be made until the autopsy. By then I 
shall be well out of the country, for the men 
\jho are on watch for me will have withdrawn 
the moment the news of my suicide is known. 
I mean to put a hypodermic syringe and a 
bottle of strong poison near the body of the 
woman. Thus all will be complete. This 
is my last trump card. 

"'And now, Miss Beringer,' she added, 
with a strange laugh, which I hear even now 
echoing in my ears^ 'for your part in this 
ghastly game. In order to insure your 
silence I mean to consign you to the frozen 
chamber from which I have just taken this 
woman. Gagged and bound in that place 
your tortures will not last long, for death will 
soon release you from them. But know that 
you can never again mingle with your fellow- 
men. Know also that you made a mistake 
when you pitted your strength against mine, 
for mine is the stronger. Come ! ' 

" She raised me as if I were an infant, and 
lifted me into the inner room. I noticed 
that one of the flagstones was up — the gag 
prevented my speaking, the thongs which 
bound me prevented my struggling. Madame 
thrust me into the frozen chamber and sealed 
the stone above me. There I have remained 
for the last fifteen hours. What I have 
endured is beyond description. At last I 
fancied I heard footsteps overhead. I made 
one frantic struggle, and managed to remove 
the gag from my lips. The moment I did so 
I shouted wildly. Thank God, you heard me 
in time." 

Miss Beringer's words fell on our ears like 
the strokes of a hammer. We were far too 
stunned to reply. Madame had been in our 
very grasp, under our hands, and once more 
she had eludftfrvd f 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



Miss Cay ley's Adventures. 



By Grant Allen. 
VII. -THE ADVENTURE OF THE UNOBTRUSIVE OASIS. 




WILL not attempt to describe 
to you the minor episodes of 
our next twelve months— the 
manuscripts we type-wrote and 
the Manitous we sold. Tis 
one of my aims in a world so 
rich in bores to avoid being tedious. I will 
merely say, therefore, that we spent the 
greater part of the year in Florence, where 
we were building up a connection, but rode 
back for the summer months to Switzerland, 
as being a livelier place for the trade in 
bicycles. The net result was not only that 
we covered our expenses, but that, as 
chancellor of the exchequer, I found myself 
with a surplus in hand at the end of the 
season. 

When we returned to Florence for the 
winter, however, I confess I began to chafe. 
11 This is slow work, Elsie ! " I said. " I 
started out to go round the world ; it has 
taken me eighteen months to travel no 
further than Italy ! At this rate, I shall 
reach New York a grey-haired old lady, in a 
nice lace cap, and totter back into London a 
venerable crone on the verge of ninety." 

However, those invaluable doctors came 
to my rescue unexpectedly. I do love 
doctors ; they are always sending you off at 
a moment's notice to delightful places you 
never dreamt of. Elsie was better, but still 
far from strong. I took it upon me to con- 
sult our medical attendant ; and his verdict 
was decisive. He did just what a doctor 
ought to do. " She is getting on very well 
in Florence/' he said ; " but if you want to 
restore her health completely, I should advise 
you to take her for a winter to Egypt. After 
six months of the dry, warm desert air, I 
don't doubt she might return to her work in 
London." 

That last point I used as a lever with 
Elsie. She positively revels in teaching 
mathematics. At first, to be sure, she 
objected that we had only just money enough 
to pav our way to Cairo, and that when we 
got there we might starve —her favourite 
programme, I have not this extraordinary 
taMe for starving ; wr idea is, to go where 
you like* and fuul something decent to eat 
when you get there. However, to humour 
her, I Ivg.in to cast alnnit me for a source of 
income. There is no absolute harm in seeing 
vour wav clear Ik fore vou for a twelvemonth, 



by Google 



though, of course, it deprives you of the 
plot-interest of poverty. 

" Elsie," I said, in my best didactic style — 
I excel in didactics — " you do not learn from 
the lessons that life sets before you. Look at 
the stage, for example ; the stage is univer- 
sally acknowledged at the present day to be a 
great teacher of morals. Does not Irving 
say so ? — and he ought to know. There is 
that splendid model for imitation, for instance, 
the Clown in the pantomime. How does 
Clown regulate his life ? Does he take 
heed for the morrow ? Not a bit of it ! £ I 
wish I had a goose,' he says, at some critical 
juncture ; and just as he says it — pat — a 
super strolls upon the stage with a property 
goose on a wooden tray ; and Clown cries, 
* Oh, look here, Joey ; herfs a goose ! ' and 
proceeds to appropriate it. Then he puts 
his fingers in his mouth and observes, ' I 
wish I had a few apples to make the sauce 
with ' ; and as the words escape him— pat 
again— a small boy with a very squeaky voice 
runs on, carrying a basket of apples. Clown 
trips him up, and bolts with the basket. 
Thtris a model for imitation ! The stage 
sets these great moral lessons before you 
regularly every Christmas; yet you fail to 
profit by them. Govern your life on the 
principles exemplified by Clown ; expect to 
find that whatever you want will turn up with 
punctuality and dispatch at the . proper 
moment. Be adventurous, and you will be 
happy. Take that as a new maxim to put in 
your copy-book ! " 

"I wish I could think so, dear," Elsie 
answered. " But your confidence staggers 
me. 

That evening at our tabk-tThote^ however, 
it was amply justified. A smooth-faced 
young man of ample girth and most pros- 
perous exterior happened to sit next us. 
He had his wife with him, so I judged it 
safe to launch on conversation. We soon 
found out he was the millionaire editor- 
proprietor of a great London daily, with 
many more strings to his journalistic 
how ; his honoured name was Elworthy. 
I mentioned casually that we thought 
of going for the winter to Egypt. He 
pricked his ears up. But at the time he said 
nothing. After dinner, we adjourned to the 
cosy >\f/t 7. I talked to him and his wife; 
and somehow, that evening, the devil entered 

Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



A SHEEP-DOG COMPETITION. 



3*9 



course has already 
been marked out 
by means of plough 
furrows, arid pre- 
sents three obsta- 
cles : a bank of 
earth and a dry 
ditch, and a 
V-shaped passage 
between two 
hedges. The dogs, 
moreover, are re- 
quired by the rules 
not to allow the 
sheep to stray from 
the course, nor to 
bite them on the 
ear, the neck, the 
fore-feet, the 
stomach, nor deeply 
on the thigh* They 
are not even 
allowed to bark. 
Dogs with diseases 
and vicious dogs 
an: to be rigidly 
excluded. It will 
therefore be seen 
that the work of the 
canines has been 
ably cut out for 
them, and that the first prize winner will be a 
dog of which any shepherd might be proud. 

The accompanying plan gives a more 
detailed idea of the course, and will repay 
examination. Rut our running commentary 
must be brief, The pen marked (1) contains 
the sheep for the competition ; (2) is an 
in closure, about 130ft, long, leading to 
another pen {3), from which the sheep are let 
out upon the track. Passing round the horse- 




irvw (ij 



FUAN OF THK CQUJS5E* 



shoe-shaped track, 
and avoiding for a 
moment the obsta- 
cles, we come to 
the arrival pen {5), 
and after passing 
through another in- 
closure, 130ft- long 
(6), reach finally 
the large pen (7), 
where all the sheep 
which pass over the 
course are received 
and massed to- 
gether. The obsta- 
cles — that is, the 
dry ditch, the 
V-shaped passage, 
and the mound of 
earth —are shown 
by (8), (9), and (10) 
respectively. Little 
more need be ex- 
plained in the dia- 
gram except that 
(12), (13), and {14) 
represent the grand 
stand for judges 
and public, and that 
(E) and (F) are the 
places set apart for 
the shepherds and their dogs before and after 
they have taken part in the competition. 

Let us now walk among the shepherds, as 
we see them pictured in the illustration on 
the first page, and admire the beautiful dogs 
of Beauce and Brie. For they are worthy of 
admiration* We, who like the good Scotch 
collie and his handsome eyes, will probably 
find the Brie dog, with his long grey and 
woolly hair, most to our liking ; and will prefer 



[/•li»i"'tf«. 




BRIE SHEPHEKp mnj. 



mmaim^uomtit* 



33* 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



1 speak of it as I find it (to borrow a phrase 
from my charwoman at Girton) ; and I am 
bound to admit that the Mediterranean did 
not treat me as a lady expects to be treated. 
It behaved disgracefully. People may 
rhapsodize as long as they choose about a 
life on the ocean wave ; for my own part, I 
wouldn't give a pin for sea-sickness. We 
glided down the Adriatic from Brindisi to 
Corfu with a reckless profusion of lateral 
motion which suggested the idea that the 
ship must have been drinking. 

I tried to rouse Elsie when we came 
abreast of the Ionian Islands, and to remind 
her that " Here was the home of Nausicaa 
in the Odyssey," Elsie failed to respond ;■ 
she was otherwise occupied* At last, I 
succumbed and gave it up. I 
remember nothing further till a 
day and a half Inter, when we 
got under lee of Crete, and the 
ship showed a tendency to 
resume the perpendicular* Then 
I began once more to take a 
languid interest in the dinner 
question. 

I may add parenthetically that 
the Mediterranean is a mere bit 
of a sea , when you look at it on 
the map — a pocket sea, to be 
regarded with mingled contempt 
and affection ; but you learn to 
respect it when you find that it 
takes four clear days and nights 
of abject misery merely to run 
across its eastern basin from 
Brindisi to Alexandria. I re- 
spected the Mediterranean im- 
mensely while we lay off the 
Peloponnesus in the trough of 
the waves with a north wind 
blowing; I only began to temper 
my respect with a distant liking 
when we passed under the 
welcome shelter of Crete on a 
calm, star-lit evening. 

It was deadly cold. We 
had not counted upon such 
weather in the sunny south* I 
recollected now that the Greeks were wont to 
represent Boreas as a chilly deity, and spoke 
of the Thracian breeze wnth the same deferen- 
tially deprecating adjectives which we our- 
selves apply to the east wind of our father- 
land ; but that apt classical memory 
somehow failed to console or warm me. 
A good-natured male passenger, however, 
volunteered to ask us, " Will I get ye a 
rug, ladies ? " The form of his courteous 



question suggested the probability of his 
Irish origin. 

"You are very kind/' 1 answered. "If 
you don't want it for yourself, Pm sure my 
friend would be glad to have the use of it" 

"Is it meself? Sure, I've got me big 
ulsther, and Vm as warrum as a toast in it. 
But ye're not provided for this weather. 
Ye've thrusted too much to those rascals the 
po-uts. ( Where breaks the blue Sicilian 
say/ the rogues write. /Vlike to set them 
down in it, wid a nor'-easter blowing 1 IJ 

He fetched up his rug. It was ample and 
soft, a smooth brown camel-hair He 
wrapped us both up in it. We sat late on 
deck that night, as warm as a toast ourselves, 
thanks to our genial Irishman. 




TIS DOCTOR MACLOtiHLEN, HE AN 5 WERE ¥>. 



We asked his name. 



Tis Dr. Mac- 



by L^OOgle 



loghlen/ J he answered. " I'm from County- 
Clare, ye see ; and I'm on me way to Egypt 
for thravel and exploration. Me fader whisht 
me to see the worruld a bit before Fd settle 
down to practise me profession at Liscannor, 
Have ye ever been in County Clare ? Sure, 
'tis the pick of Oireland," 

"We have that pleasure still in store," I 
answered, smiling. "It spreads gold-leaf 
Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



MISS CAYLEY'S ADVENTURES. 



33i 



over the future, as George Meredith puts 
it." 

"Is it Meredith? Ah, there's the foine 
writer ! Tis jaynius the man has : I can't 
undtherstand a word of him. But he's half 
Oirish, ye know. What proof have I got of 
it? An' would he write like that if there 
wasn't a dhrop of the blood of the Celt in 
him ? " 

Next day and next night, Dr. Macloghlen 
was our devoted slave. I had won his heart 
by admitting frankly that his countrywomen 
had the finest and liveliest eyes in Europe 
— eyes with a deep twinkle, half fun, half 
passion. He took to us at once, and 
talked to us incessantly. He was a red- 
haired, raw-boned Munster-man, but a real 
good fellow. We forgot the aggressive 
inequalities of the Mediterranean while he 
talked to us of " the pizza n try." Late the 
second evening he propounded a confidence. 
It was a lovely night ; Orion overhead, and 
the plashing phosphorescence on the water 
below conspired with the hour to make him 
specially confidential. " Now, Miss Cayley," 
he said, leaning forward on his deck chair, 
and gazing earnestly into my eyes, "there's 
wan question I'd like to ask ye. The am- 
bition of me life is to get into Parlimint. 
And I want to know from ye, as a frind — if 
I accomplish me heart's wish — is there anny- 
thing, in me apparence, ar in me voice, ar in 
me accent, ar in me manner, that would lade 
annybody to suppose I was an Oirishman ? " 

I succeeded, by good luck, in avoiding 
Elsie's eye. What on earth could I answer ? 
Then a happy thought struck me. " Dr. 
Macloghlen," I said, "it would not be the 
slightest use your trying to conceal it; for 
even if nobody ever detected a faint Irish 
intonation in your words or phrases — how 
could your eloquence fail to betray you for 
a countryman of Sheridan and Burke and 
Grattan ? " 

He seized my hand with such warmth that 
I thought it best to hurry down to my state- 
room at once, under cover of my compliment. 

At Alexandria and Cairo we found him 
invaluable. He looked after our luggage, 
which he gallantly rescued from the lean 
hands of fifteen Arab porters, all eagerly 
struggling to gain possession of our effects ; 
he saw us safe into the train ; and he never 
quitted us till he had safely ensconced us in 
our rooms at Shepheard's. For himself, he 
said, with subdued melancholy, 'twas to some 
cheaper hotel he must go ; Shepheard's wasn't 
for the likes of him ; though if land in County 
Clare was wort' what it ought to be, there 

Digitized by i 



wasn't a finer estate in all Oireland than his 
fader's. 

Our Mr. Elworthy was a modern proprietor, 
who knew how to do things on the lordly 
scale. Having commissioned me to write 
this series of articles, he intended them to be 
written in the first style of art, and he had 
instructed me accordingly to hire one of 
Cook's little steam dahabeeahs, where I 
could work at leisure. Dr. Macloghlen was 
in his element arranging for the trip. " Sure 
the only thing I mind," he said, " is — that 
I'll not be going wid ye." I think he was 
half inclined to invite himself ; but there 
again I drew a line. I will not sell salt fish ; 
and I will not go up the Nile, unchaperoned, 
with a casual man acquaintance. 

He did the next best thing, however : he 
took a place in a sailing dahabeeah ; and as 
we steamed up slowly, stopping often on the 
way, to give me time to write my articles, he 
managed to arrive almost always at every 
town or ruin exactly when we did. 

I will not describe the voyage. The Nile 
is the Nile. Just at first, before we got used 
to it, we conscientiously looked up the name 
of every village we passed on the bank in our 
Murray and our Baedeker. After a couple 
of days' Niling, however, we found that 
formality quite unnecessary. They were all 
the same village, under a number of aliases. 
They did not even take the trouble to 
disguise themselves anew, like Dr. Fortescue- 
Langley, on each fresh appearance. They 
had every one of them a small white- 
washed mosque, with a couple of tall 
minarets ; and around it spread a number of 
mud-built cottages, looking more like bee- 
hives than human habitations. They had 
also every one of them a group of date-palms, 
overhanging a cluster of mean bare houses ; 
and they all alike had a picturesque and even 
imposing air from a distance, but faded away 
into indescribable squalor as one got abreast 
of them. Our progress was monotonous. 
At twelve, noon, we would pass Aboo-Teeg, 
with its mosque, its palms, its mud-huts, and 
its camels ; then for a couple of hours we 
would go on through . the midst of a 
green field on either side, studded by more 
mud-huts, and backed up by a range of 
grey desert mountains ; only to come at 
2 p.m., twenty miles higher up, upon Aboo- 
Teeg once more, with the same mosque, the 
same mud-huts, and the same haughty camels, 
placidly chewing the same aristocratic cud, 
but under the alias of Koos-kam. After a 
wild hubbub at the quay, we would leave 
Koos-kam behind, with its camels still 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



33* 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



serenely munching day before yesterday's 
dinner ; and twenty miles further on, again, 
having passed through the same green plain, 
backed by the same grey mountains, we 
would stop once more at the identical Koos- 
kam, which this time absurdly described itself 
as Tahtah. But whether it was Aboo-Teeg 
or Koos-kam or Tahtah or anything else, 
only the name differed : it was always the 
same town, and had always the same camels 
at precisely the same stage of the digestive 
process. It seemed to us immaterial whether 
you saw all the Nile or only five miles of 
it. It was just like wall-paper. A sample 
sufficed ; the whole was the sample infinitely 
repeated. 

However, I had my letters to write^ and I 
wrote them valiantly, I described the various 
episodes of the complicated digestive process 
in the camel in the minutest detail I gloated 
over the date-palms, which I knew in three 
days as if I had been brought up upon dates. 
I gave word pictures of every individual child, 
veiled woman, Arab sheikh, and Coptic 
priest whom we encountered on the voyage. 
And I am open to reprint those conscientious 
studies of mud-huts and minarets with any 
enterprising publisher who will make me an 
offer. 

Another disillusion 
weighed upon my souL 
Before I went up the 
Nile, I had a fancy of my 
own that the bank was 
studded with endless 
ruined temples, whose 
vast red colonnades were 
reflected in the water 
at every turn* I think 
Macaulay's Lays were 
primarily answerable for 
that particular misappre- 
hension. As a matter 
of fact, it surprised me 
to find that we often 
went for two whole days' 
hard steaming without 
ever a temple breaking 
the monotony of those 
eternal date-palms, 
those calm and super- 
ciliously irresponsive 
camels. In my humble 
opinion, Egypt is a 
fraud ; there is too much 
Nile — very dirty Nile at that --and not nearly 
enough temple. Besides, the temples, when 
you do come up with them, aiv just like the 
villages ; they are the same temple over 

Digitized by GoOfllc 



again, under a different name each time, and 
i hey have the same gods, the same kings, 
the same wearisome bas-reliefs, except that 
the gentleman in a chariot, ten feet high, who 
is mowing down enemies a quarter his own 
sue, with unsportsmanlike recklessness, is 
called Rameses in this place, and Sethi in 
that, and Amen-hotep in the other. With 
this trifling variation, when you have seen 
one temple, one obelisk, one hieroglyphic 
table, you have seen the whole of Ancient 
Egypt. 

At last, after many days' voyage through 
the same scenery daily — rising in the 
morning off a village with a mosque, ten 
palms, and two minarets, and retiring 
late at night off the same village once 
more, with mosque, palms, and minarets, 
as before, da capo^-vit arrived one evening 
at a place called Geergeh. In itself, I 
believe, Geergeh did not differ materially 
from all the other places we had passed on 
our voyage ; it had its mosque, its ten palms, 
and its two minarets as usual. But I 
remember its name, because something 
mysterious went wrong there with our ma- 
chinery; and the engineer informed us 
we must wait at least three days to mend 




"TOO MUCH MILK. 

Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 






AfJSS CAYLEYS ADVENTURES. 



333 



it. l)r, Macloghlen's dahabeeah happened 
opportunely to arrive at the same spot 
on the same day; and he declared with 
fervour he would "see us through our 
throubles." But what on earth were we to do 
with ourselves through three long days and 
nights at Cieergch ? There were the ruins of 
Ahydus close at hand, to be sure ; though I 
defy anybody not a professed Egyptologist to 
give more than one day to the ruins of 
Ahydus. In this emergency. Dr. Macloghlen 
came gallantly to our aid He discovered by 
inquiring from an English-speaking guide 
that there was an unobtrusive oasis, never 
visited by Europeans, one long day's 
journey off, across the desert. As a 
rule, it takes at least three days to 
get camels and guides together for 
such an expedition : for Egypt is not 
a land to hurry in. But the indefatig- 
able Doctor further unearthed the 
fact that a sheikh had just come in, 
who (for a consideration) would lend 
us camels for a two days' trip ; and 
we seized the chance to do our duty 
by Mr. El worthy and the world-wide 
circulation. An un visited oasis — and 
two Christian ladies to be the first to 
explore it : there's journalistic enter- 
prise for you ! If we happened to be 
kilL <i, so much the better for the 
Daiiy Ttitphom. I pictured the 
excitement at Piccadilly Circus. 
M Extra Special, Our Own Corre- 
spondent brutally murdered ! " I 
rejoiced at the opportunity. 

I cannot honestly say that Elsie 
rejoiced with me, She cherished a 
prejudice against camels, massa- 
cres, and the new journalism. 
She didn't like being murdered : 
though this was premature, for 
she had never tried it. She 
objected that the fanatical 
Mohammedans of the Senoosi 
sect, who were said to inhabit 
the oasis in question, might cut 
our throats for dogs of infidels, I pointed 
out to her at some length that it was just that 
chance which added zest to our expedition as 
a journalistic venture : fancy the glory of 
lieing the first lady journalists martyred in 
the cause ! But she failed to grasp this aspect 
of the question. However, if 1 went, she 
would go too, she said, like a dear girl that 
she is : she would not desert me when I was 
getting my throat cut. 

Dr. Macloghlen made the bargain for us, 
and insisted on accompanying us across the 

Digitized by VjOOg J C 



desert. He told us his method of negotia- 
tion with the Arabs with extreme gusto. 
'''Is it pay in advance ye want?' says I to 
the dirty beggars : * divvil a penny will ye gtt 
till ye bring these ladies safe back to Gecrgeh* 
And reffiiniber, Mr. Sheikh/ says I, fingering 
me pistol so, by way of emphasis, * we take 
no money wid us ; so if yer friends at W'adi 
Bou choose to cut our throats, 'tis for the 
pleasure of it they'll be cutting them, not for 
anything they'll gain by U. ; * Provisions, 
effendi ? J says h e t sa ham i ng. * Pro vi si o n s 
is it?* flays L 'Take everything yell 
want wid you ; I suppose ye can buy 




BMPHAS3S, 



food fit for a Crischun in the bazaar in 
Geergeh ; and never wan penny do ye touch 
for it all till yeVe landed us on the bank 
again, as safe as ye took us. So if the 
religious sintiments of the faithful at Wadi 
Bou should lade them to hack us to pieces, 1 
says I, just waving me revolver, 'thin 'tis 
yerself that will lm out of pocket by it.' And 
the ould divvil cringed as if he took me for 
the Prince of Wales. Faix, 'tis the purse 
that's the best aigumint to catch these 
hay then Arabs upon." 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



Picturesque People in Clay, Wood, and Shell 

By Geoegk Harpkr. 

I Unit rations from Photographs specially taken hy Gwrge Ntwnes> Ltd. 




NI<]CKH hllNSTItjLLH FROM I\AHAGUAV* 




HO has not seen the nigger 
minstrels? Who has not at 
some time in his life laughed 
and cried with them— laughing 
at their noisy horse-play and 
their abundant joktis ; and cry- 
ing (in later years) when those moss-grown 

jokes, heavy with the weight of years, bobbed 

up again immortal? Who would not be a 

nigger minstrel ? 

But who ever heard of a nigger minstrel 

troupe in Paraguay ? Tell us that such a 

thing is impossible and unknown in this 

South American hind, and we 

will show you that there are 

many things in the world you 

know naught of. For here, at 

the top of this page, are four 

nigger minstrels, whose history 

has been connected with 

Paraguay since the inception, 

probably, of that ancient State, 

They bear the marks of time 

upon their ebon brows, and 

hnve the general appearance 

of decay that betrays the aged, 
But if you ask us to tell 

you more about them, we 

cannot. You may see 

them for yourself in the 

Ethnographical Museum at 




STATITFTTK 



the Trocadero, in Paris, where they rest 
in a glass case on the stairs, trying, in vain, 
as it were, to make their plantation ditty 
heard outside the glass. Like us all, they 
are made of clay, but these are hard-baked 
clay niggers, and have been singing away for 
centuries in this stiflfand stolid style. They 
are not up to date niggers, for, in the photo- 
graph, we miss the " tarn bo " and the bones ; 
and find instead the drum, and fife, and 
gay guitar. But, for real long, lean, and 
wonderfully constructed niggers, they are 
evidently making a great volume of noise. 
Note the fine, open counten- 
ances of the end men, and 
deny this, if you will- M, 
Creveillez, a French traveller, 
who found and presented 
them to the museum a few 
years ago, left no word as 
to who made them or when 
they were made. Their 
history, in short, is Sphinx- 
like in its obscurity. One fact 
alone we know — the potter 
who formed them was an 
expert, with a perfect know- 
ledge of the negro face, and 
with a ddighllul sense of 
humour. He, too, must have 
loved the minstrels when a boy. 



CARVKL* BY A 

ARO CI-AY 



by 



Gc 



IC 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



PICTURESQUE PEOPLE IN CLAY, WOOD, AND SHELL. 325 



Interesting as they are ? however, we must 
leave the niggers and pass on to other 
interesting things, They are all in this 
wonderful Paris museum, and no trip to 
Paris ought to be comnleted without seeing 
them j but for 
the benefit of 
those who will 
never get to the 
gay city, we have 
taken photo- 
graphs of some 
of the curious 
things on the 
shelves, by the 
kind permission 
of the Director. 
All except the 
negro orchestra 
were made by 
children, and 
the first of 
these, made by 
a little boy in 
Ille et Villaine, 

France, is shown at the foot of the first page* 
It is but a crude attempt to carve the human 
features in hard clay, and looked lonesome 
when we saw it on the shelves, but the little boy 
was happy over his toy, and he may now be 
one of the first sculptors of France. Small 
and insignificant as it is, the museum would 
not part with it for worlds. 

More curious and humorous are the 




SISIKK UF MJiHCV A Mi TWIEST, CAUVfiP E!Y CH|I.|lKKN OUT OV FsKtKK- WCJOI> H 



material, the expressions on the different 
faces are really remarkable. The eyes, noses, 
and buttons on several are made by the appli- 
cation of ink or a hot iron- With an apti- 
tude wonderful for their years, the children 

have utilized 
the bark for 
hats, hair, arms, 
and coat - tails. 
Note the hood 
worn by the 
sister of mercy, 
the arms and 
frayed robe of 
the priest, the 
flapping tails of 
the gendarme, 
and the hair of 
the advocate* 
They are merely 
toys, but how 
many moments 
must have been 
spent in making 
them ! 
Near these brier- wood figures, in a special 
case, stand some very wonderful figures made 
of shells and pieces of cork by the children 
of fishermen in Prefailles, Loire Interieure, 
France ; and at the top of the next page we 
may note the first of this curious group, a 
seaweed-gatherer with the spear and sea- 
weed in her hand. The trunk is made of 
cork taken from some old fishing-net, and the 




ma-oca tk and fknvrMCiAt. oenharmk. carveu mv chu.uhkn ovv of ufmkn-ivuud. 



diminutive figures shown on this page, 
carved with knives by children out of brier- 
wood. The little men and women stand 
with dignity on one of the shelves, and, not- 
withstanding the limitations offered by the 



by Kj 



jL 



IC 



skirt, collar, and hat are made of shells, 
probably picked up along the beach by these 
little toilers of the sea. Little is known about 
the figures. They were found, as the nigger 
orchestra was found, by another French 

Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



33^ 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



"Army chance, of a rescue, is it?" the 
Doctor broke in, a trifle too ostensibly. " If 
it costs us a whole British Army, me dear 
lady, we'll fetch you away and save you." 

" But oow — to-day ? You won't go away 
and leave me ? You are the first Europeans 
I have seen since Khartoum fell. They may 
sell me again. You will not desert me?" 

" No," I said. " We will not." Then I 
reflected a moment. 

What on earth could we do ? This was a 
painful dilemma. If we once lost sight of 
her, we might not see her again. Yet if we 
walked with her openly, and talked like 
friends, we would betray ourselves, and her, 
to those fanatical Senoosis. 

I made my mind up promptly. I may not 
have much of a mind ; but, such as it is, I 
flatter myself I can make it up at a moment's 
notice. 

" Can you come to us outside the gate at 
sunset ?" I asked, as if speaking to Elsie. 

The woman hesitated. " I think so." 

" Then keep us in sight all day, and when 
evening comes, stroll out behind us." 

She turned over some embroidered slip- 
pers on a booth, and seemed to be inspecting 
them. " But my children ? " she murmured, 
anxiously. 

The Doctor interposed. "Is it childern 
she has ? " he asked. " Thin they'll be the 
Mohammedan gintleman's. We mustn't 
interfere wid them. We can take away the 
lady — she's English, and detained against 
her will : but we can't deprive anny man of 
his own childern." 

I was firm, and categorical. "Yes, we 
can," I said, stoutly ; " if he has forced a 
woman to bear them to him whether she 
would or not. That's common justice. I 
have no respect for the Mohammedan 
gentleman's rights. Let her bring them 
with her. How many are there ? " 

" Two — a boy and' girl ; not very old ; .the 
eldest is seven." She spoke wistfully. A 
mother is a mother. 

"Then say no more now, but keep us 
always in sight, and we will keep you. Come 
to us at the gate about sundown. We will 
carry you off with us." 

She clasped her hands and moved off with 
the peculiar gliding air of the veiled Moham- 
medan woman. Our eyes followed her. We 
walked on through the bazaar, thinking of 
nothing else now. It was strange how this 
episode made us forget our selfish fears for 
our own safety. Even dear, timid Elsie 
remembered only that an Englishwoman's 
life and liberty were at stake. We kept her 



more or less in view all day. She glided in 
and out among the people in the alleys. 
When we went back to the camels at lunch- 
time, she followed us unobtrusively through 
the open gate, and sat watching us from a 
little way off, among a crowd of gazers ; for 
all Wadi Bou was of course agog at this 
unwonted invasion. 

We discussed the circumstance loudly, so 
that she might hear our plans. Dr. Mac- 
loghlen advised that we should tell our sheikh 
we meant to return part of the way to Geergeh 
that evening by moonlight. I quite agreed 
with him. It was the only way out. Besides, 
I didn't like the looks of the people. They 
eyed us askance. This was getting exciting 
now. I felt a professional journalistic interest 
Whether we escaped or got killed, what 
splendid business for the Daily Telephone! 

The sheikh, of course, declared it was 
impossible to start that evening. The men 
wouldn't move — the camels needed rest. But 
Dr. Macloghlen was inexorable. " Very well, 
thin, Mr. Sheikh," he answered, philosophi- 
cally. " Ye '11 plaze yerself about whether ye 
come on wid us or whether ye shtop. That's 
yer own business. But we set out at sun- 
down; and whin ye return by yerself on 
foot to Geergeh, ye can ask for yer camels at 
the British Consulate." 

All through that anxious afternoon we sat 
in our tents, under the shade of the mud 
wall, wondering whether we could carry out 
our plan or not About an hour before 
sunset the veiled woman strolled out of 
the gate with her two children. She joined 
the crowd of sight -seers once more, for 
never through the day were we left alone for 
a second. The excitement grew intense. 
Elsie and I moved up carelessly towards the 
group, talking as if to one another. I looked 
hard at Elsie : then I said, as though I were 
speaking about one of the children, " Go 
straight along the road to Geergeh till you 
are past the big clump of palms at the edge 
of the oasis. Just beyond it comes a sharp 
ridge of rock. Wait behind the ridge where 
no one can see you. When we get there," 
I patted the little girl's head, "don't say a 
word, but jump on my camel. My two 
friends will each take one of the children. 
If you understand and consent, stroke your 
boy's curls. We will accept that for a 
signal." 

She stroked the child's head at once with- 
out the least hesitation. Even through her 
veil and behind her dress, I could somehow 
feel and see her trembling nerves, her beating 
heart. But she gave no overt token. She 



bydGOgle 



U 1 1 I U I I I _' 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



MISS CAYLEYS ADVENTURES. 



337 



merely turned and muttered something care- 
lessly in Arabic to a woman beside her. 

We waited once more, in long- drawn 
suspense. Would she manage to escape 
them ? Would they suspect her motives? 

After ten minutes, when we had returned to 
our crouching-place under the shadow of the 
wall, the woman detached herself slowly from 
the group, and began strolling with almost 
overdone nonchalance along the road to 
Geergeh, We could see the little girl 
was frightened and seemed to expostulate 
with her mother : fortunately, the Arabs 
about were too much occupied in watching 
the suspicious strangers to notice this episode 
of their own people. Presently, our new 
friend disappeared ; and, with beating hearts, 
we awaited the sunset. 

Then came the usual scene of hubbub 
with the sheikh, the camels, the porters, and 
the drivers. It was eagerness against apathy. 
With difficulty we made them understand we 
meant to get under way at all hazards. I 
stormed in bad Arabic. The Doctor in- 
veighed in very choice Irish, At last they 
yieldedj and set out. One 
by one the camels rose, 
bent their slow knees, and 
began to stalk in their lordly 
way with outstretched necks 
along the road to the river. 
W T e moved through 
the palm groves, a 
crowd of boys follow- 
ing us and shouting 
for backsheesh. We 
bey an to be afraid 
they would accompany 
us too far and dis- 
cover our fugitive ; 
but fortunately they 
all turned back with 
one accord at a little 
whitewashed shrine 
near the edge of the 
oasis. We reached 
the clump of palms \ 
we turned the corner of the ridge. Had we 
missed one another? No ! There, crouching 
by the rocks, with her children by her side, 
sat our mysterious stranger 

The Doctor was equal to the emergency. 
** Make those bastes kneel ! " he cried 
authoritatively to the sheikh. 

The sheikh was taken aback. This was a 
new exploit hurst upon him. He flung his 
arms up, gesticulating wildly. The Doctor, 
unmoved , made the drivers understand by 
some strange pantomime what he wanted. 

ized by GOOgle 



They nodded, half terrified* In a second, 
the stranger was by my side, Elsie had taken 
the girl, the Doctor the boy, and the camels 
were passively beginning to rise again. That 
is the best of your camel Once set him on 
his road, and he goes mechanically. 

The sheikh broke out with several loud 
remarks in Arabic, which we did not 
understand, but whose hostile character could 
not easily escape us* He was beside himself 
with anger. Then I was suddenly aware of 
the splendid advantage of having an Irish- 
man on our side, Dn Macloghlen drew his 
revolver, like one well used to such episodes, 
and pointed it full at the angry Arab. 
lt Look here, Mr. Sheikh," he said, calmly, 
yet with a fine touch of bravado ; u do ye 
see this revolver? Well, unless ye make yer 
camels th ravel sthraight to Geergeh widout 
wan other wurrud, 'tis yer own brains will be 
spattered, sor, on the sand of this desert! And 
if ye touch wan hair of our heads, yell answer 
for it wid yer life to the British Government" 




Vol. kyL~43. 



CROUCHING EY THE ROCKS SAT OUR MYSTERIOUS STRANCEH. 



I do not feci sure that the sheikh com- 
prehended the exact nature of each word 
in this comprehensive threat, but I am 
certain he took in its general meaning, 
punctuated as it was with some flourishes of 
the revolver. He turned to the drivers and 
made a gesture of despair. It meant, 
apparently, that this infidel was too much 
for him. Then he called out a few sharp 
directions in Arabic. Next minute, our 
camels 1 legs were stepping out briskly along 
the road to Cieergeh with a promptitude which 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



Miss Cay ley's Adventures, 



By Grant Allen. 
VII.— THE ADVENTURE OF THE UNOBTRUSIVE OASIS. 










WILL not attempt to describe 
to you the minor episodes of 
our next twelve months — the 
manuscripts we type-wrote and 
the Manitous we sold. Tis 
one of my aims in a world so 
rich in bores to avoid being tedious. I will 
merely say, therefore, that we spent the 
greater part of the year in Florence, where 
we were building up a connection, but rode 
back for the summer months to Switzerland, 
as being a livelier place for the trade in 
bicycles. The net result was not only that 
we covered our expenses, but that, as 
chancellor of the exchequer, I found myself 
with a surplus in hand at the end of the 
season. 

When we returned to Florence for the 
winter, however, I confess I began to chafe. 
" This is slow work, Elsie ! " I said. " I 
started out to go round the world ; it has 
taken me eighteen months to travel no 
further than Italy ! At this rate, I shall 
reach New York a grey-haired old lady, in a 
nice lace cap, and totter back into London a 
venerable crone on the verge of ninety." 

However, those invaluable doctors came 
to my rescue unexpectedly. I do love 
doctors ; they are always sending you off at 
a moment's notice to delightful places you 
never dreamt of. Elsie was better, but still 
far from strong. I took it upon me to con- 
sult our medical attendant ; and his verdict 
was decisive. He did just what a doctor 
ought to do. " She is getting on very well 
in Florence," he said ; " but if you want to 
restore her health completely, I should advise 
you to take her for a winter to Egypt. After 
six months of the dry, warm desert air, I 
don't doubt she might return to her work in 
London." 

That last point I used as a lever with 
Elsie. She positively revels in teaching 
mathematics. At first, to be sure, she 
objected that we had only just money enough 
to pay our way to Cairo, and that when we 
got there we might starve— her favourite 
programme. I have not this extraordinary 
taste for starving ; my idea is, to go where 
you like, and find something decent to eat 
when you get there. However, to humour 
her, I began to cast about me for a source of 
income. There is no absolute harm in seeing 
your way clear before you for a twelvemonth, 



by Google 



though, of course, it deprives you of the 
plot-interest of poverty. 

" Elsie," I said, in my best didactic style — 
I excel in didactics — " you do not learn from 
the lessons that life sets before you. Look at 
the stage, for example ; the stage is univer- 
sally acknowledged at the present day to be a 
great teacher of morals. Does not Irving 
say so? — and he ought to know. There is 
that splendid model for imitation, for instance, 
the Clown in the pantomime. How does 
Clown regulate his life? Does he take 
heed for the morrow ? Not a bit of it ! 'I 
wish I had a goose,' he says, at some critical 
juncture ; and just as he says it — pat — a 
super strolls upon the stage with a property 
goose on a wooden tray ; and Clown cries, 
' Oh, look here, Joey ; here's a goose ! ' and 
proceeds to appropriate it. Then he puts 
his fingers in his mouth and observes, * I 
wish I had a few apples to make the sauce 
with ' ; and as the words escape him— pat 
again— a small boy with a very squeaky voice 
runs on, carrying a basket of apples. Clown 
trips him up, and bolts with the basket. 
There's a model for imitation ! The stage 
sets these great moral lessons before you 
regularly every Christmas; yet you fail to 
profit by them. Govern your life on the 
principles exemplified by Clown ; expect to 
find that whatever you want will turn up with 
punctuality and dispatch at the • proper 
moment. Be adventurous, and you will be 
happy. Take that as a new maxim to put in 
your copy-book ! " 

"I wish I could think so, dear," Elsie 
answered. " But your confidence staggers 
me." 

That evening at our tabk-cThdte, however, 
it was amply justified. A smooth-faced 
young man of ample girth and most pros- 
perous exterior happened to sit next us. 
He had his wife with him, so I judged it 
safe to launch on conversation. We soon 
found out he was the millionaire editor- 
proprietor of a great London daily, with 
many more strings to his journalistic 
bow ; his honoured name was Elworthy. 
I mentioned casually that we thought 
of going for the winter to Egypt. He 
pricked his ears up. But at the time he said 
nothing. After dinner, we adjourned to the 
cosy salon. I talked to him and his wife ; 
and somehow, that evening, the devil entered 

Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



MISS CAYLEY'S ADVENTURES. 



329 



into me. I am subject to devils. I hasten 
to add, they are mild ones, I had one of my 
reckless moods just then, however, and I 
reeled off rattling stories of our various 
adventures. Mr. El worthy believed in youth 
and audacity ; I could see I interested him. 
The more he was amused, the more reckless 
I became, " That's bright,'' he said at last, 
when I told him the tale of our amateur 
exploits in the sale of Manitous. " That 
would make a good article ! " 

" Yes," I answered, with bravado, deter- 
mined to strike while the iron was hot 
44 What the .Daily Telephone lacks is just one 
enlivening touch of feminine brightness." 

He smiled " What is your forte ? " he 
inquired, 

u My forte/' I answered, "is — to go where 
I choose, and write what I like about it." 

He smiled again. " And a very good new 
departure in journalism, too ! A roving 
commission ! Have you ever tried your 
band at writing ? rT 

Had I ever tried ! It was the ambition of 
my life to see myself in print ; though, 
hitherto, it had been ineffectual "I have 
written a few sketches," I answered, with 
becoming modesty, As a matter of fact, our 
office bulged with my unpublished manu- 
scripts, 

u Could you let me see them ? " he asked. 

I assented, with inner joy, but outer 
reluctance, " If you wish it/' I mur- 
mured \ "but — you must be very 
lenient !" 

Though I had not told Elsie, the 
truth of the matter was* I had just 
then conceived an idea for a novel — 
my magnum opus — the setting of which 
compelled Egyptian local 
colour ; and I was therefore, 
dying to get to Egypt, if chance 
so willed it. I submitted a 
few of my picked manuscripts, 
accordingly, to Mr, El worthy, 
in fear and trembling. He 
read them, cruel man, before 
my very eyes ; I sat and waited, 
twiddling my thumbs, demure 
but apprehensive. 

When he had finished, he 
laid them down, 

"Racy \ n he said. " Racy ! 
You're quite right, Miss 
Cay ley, That's just what we 
want on the Daily Telephone* 
I should like to print these three/' selecting 
them out, "at our usual rate of pay per 
thousand/' 

VoL xvL— 4-2- _ . 

zed by \j009 Ic 



11 You are very kind 7 ' But the room 
reeled with me. 

"Not at all. I am a man of business. 
And these are good copy. Now, about 
this Egypt I will put the matter in the 
shape of a business proposition, Will you 
undertake, if I pay your passage, and your 
friend's* with all travelling expenses, to let me 
have three descriptive articles a week, on 
Cairo, the Nile* Syria, and India, running to 
about two thousand words apiece, at three 
guineas a thousand? " 

My breath came and went It was posi- 
tive opulence. The super with the goose 
couldn't approach it for patness. My editor 
had brought me the apple sauce as well, 
without even giving me the trouble of cook- 
ing it, 

The very next day everything was arranged* 
Elsie tried to protest, on the foolish ground 
that she had no money : but the faculty had 
ordered the apex of her right lung to go to 
Egypt, and I couldn't let her fly in the face 
of the faculty. \Ve secured our berths in a 
P. and O. steamer from Brindisi ; and within 
a week we w + ere tossing upon the bosom of 
the blue Mediterranean. 

People who haven't crossed the blue 
Mediterranean cherish an absurd idea that it 
is always calm and warm and sunny. I am 
sorry to take away any sea's character ; but 




' HE READ T 






UHE MV VEKV EYES, 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



33° 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



1 speak of it as I find it (to borrow a phrase 
from my charwoman at Girton) ; and lam 
bound to admit that the Mediterranean did 
not treat me as a lady expects to be treated. 
It behaved disgracefully. People may 
rhapsodize as long as they choose about a 
life on the ocean wave ; for my own part, I 
wouldn't give a pin for sea-sickness. We 
glided down the Adriatic from Brindisi to 
Corfu with a reckless profusion of lateral 
motion which suggested the idea that the 
ship must have been drinking. 

I tried to rouse Elsie when we came 
abreast of the Ionian Islands, and to remind 
her that " Here was the home of Nausicaa 
in the Odyssey/ 1 Elsie failed to respond ; 
she was otherwise occupied. At last, 1 
.succumbed and gave it up. I 
remember nothing further till a 
day and a half later, when we 
got under lee of Crete, and the 
ship showed a tendency to 
resu m e t h e per pei i d i cu la r . The n 
I began once more to take a 
languid interest in the dinner 
question. 

I may add parenthetically that 
the Mediterranean is a mere hit 
of a sea, when you look at it on 
the map — a pocket sea, to be 
regarded with mingled contempt 
and affection ; but you learn to 
respect it when you find that it 
takes four clear days and nights 
of abject misery merely to run 
across its eastern basin from 
Brindisi to Alexandria. I re- 
spected the Mediterranean im- 
mensely while we lay off the 
Peloponnesus in the trough of 
the waves with a north wind 
blowing; I only began to temper 
my respect with a distant liking 
when we passed under the 
welcome shelter of Crete on a 
calm, star-lit evening. 

It was deadly cold. We 
had not counted upon such 
weather in the sunny south, I 
recollected now that the Greeks were wont to 
represent Boreas as a chilly deity, and spoke 
of the Thracian breeze with the same deferen- 
tially deprecating adjectives which we our- 
selves apply to the east wind of our father- 
land ; but that apt classical memory 
somehow T failed to console or warm me* 
A good-natured male passenger, however, 
volunteered to ask us, " Will I get ye a 
rug, ladies ? " The form of his courteous 



question suggested the probability of his 
Irish origin. 

"You are very kind," I answered "If 
you don'! want it for yourself, I'm sure my 
friend would be glad to have the use of it" 

"Is it meself? Sure, I've got me big 
ulsther, and Vm as warrum as a toast in it 
But ye 1 re not provided for this weather. 
Ye've th rusted too much to those rascals the 
po-uts, ' Where breaks the blue Sicilian 
say,' the rogues write, /'rflike to set them 
down in it, wid a nor'-easter blowing ! M 

He fetched up his rug. It was ample and 
soft, a smooth brown camel-hair. He 
wrapped us both up in it. We sat late on 
deck that night, as warm as a toast ourselves, 
thanks to our genial Irishman. 




by dOOgle 



We asked his name, il 'Tis Dr, Mac- 
loghlen," he answered " I'm from County 
Clare, ye see ; and I'm on me way to Egypt 
for thravel and exploration. Me fader whisht 
me to see the worruld a bit before Td settle 
down to practise me profession at Liscannor. 
Have ye ever been in County Clare ? Sure, 
'tis the pick of Oireland." 

u We have that pleasure still in store," I 
answered, smiling, "It spreads gold-leaf 
Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



MISS CAYLETS ADVENTURES. 



33i 



over the future, as George Meredith puts 
it." 

"Is it Meredith? Ah, there's the foine 
writer ! Tis jaynius the man has : I can't 
undtherstand a word of him. But he's half 
Oirish, ye know. What proof have I got of 
it? An' would he write like that if there 
wasn't a dhrop of the blood of the Celt in 
him ? " 

Next day and next night, Dr. Macloghlen 
was our devoted slave. I had won his heart 
by admitting frankly that his countrywomen 
had the finest and liveliest eyes in Europe 
— eyes with a deep twinkle, half fun, half 
passion. He took to us at once, and 
talked to us incessantly. He was a red- 
haired, raw-boned Munster-man, but a real 
good fellow. We forgot the aggressive 
inequalities of the Mediterranean while he 
talked to us of " the pizza n try." Late the 
second evening he propounded a confidence. 
It was a lovely night ; Orion overhead, and 
the plashing phosphorescence on the water 
below conspired with the hour to make him 
specially confidential. " Now, Miss Cayley," 
he said, leaning forward on his deck chair, 
and gazing earnestly into my eyes, "there's 
wan question I'd like to ask ye. The am- 
bition of me life is to get into Parlimint. 
And I want to know from ye, as a frind— if 
I accomplish me heart's wish — is there anny- 
thing, in me apparence, ar in me voice, ar in 
me accent, ar in me manner, that would lade 
annybody to suppose I was an Oirishman ? " 

I succeeded, by good luck, in avoiding 
Elsie's eye. What on earth could I answer ? 
Then a happy thought struck me. " Dr. 
Macloghlen," I said, " it would not be the 
slightest use your trying to conceal it; for 
even if nobody ever detected a faint Irish 
intonation in your words or phrases — how 
could your eloquence fail to betray you for 
a countryman of Sheridan and Burke and 
Grattan ? " 

He seized my hand with such warmth that 
I thought it best to hurry down to my state- 
room at once, under cover of my compliment 

At Alexandria and Cairo we found him 
invaluable. He looked after our luggage, 
which he gallantly rescued from the lean 
hands of fifteen Arab porters, all eagerly 
struggling to gain possession of our effects ; 
he saw us safe into the train ; and he never 
quitted us till he had safely ensconced us in 
our rooms at Shepheard's. For himself, he 
said, with subdued melancholy, 'twas to some 
cheaper hotel he must go ; Shepheard's wasn't 
for the likes of him ; though if land in County 
Clare was wort' what it ought to be, there 

Digitized by Gt 



wasn't a finer estate in all Oireland than his 
fader's. 

Our Mr. Elworthy was a modern proprietor, 
who knew how to do things on the lordly 
scale. Having commissioned me to write 
this series of articles, he intended them to be 
written in the first style of art, and he had 
instructed me accordingly to hire one of 
Cook's little steam dahabeeahs, where I 
could work at leisure. Dr. Macloghlen was 
in his element arranging for the trip. " Sure 
the only thing I mind," he said, "is — that 
I'll not be going wid ye." I think he was 
half inclined to invite himself ; but there 
again I drew a line. I will not sell salt fish \ 
and I will not go up the Nile, unchaperoned, 
with a casual man acquaintance. 

He did the next best thing, however : he 
took a place in a sailing dahabeeah ; and as 
we steamed up slowly, stopping often on the 
way, to give me time to write my articles, he 
managed to arrive almost always at every 
town or ruin exactly when we did. 

I will not describe the voyage. The Nile 
is the Nile. Just at first, before we got used 
to it, we conscientiously looked up the name 
of every village we passed on the bank in our 
Murray and our Baedeker. After a couple 
of days' Niling, however, we found that 
formality quite unnecessary. They were all 
the same village, under a number of aliases. 
They did not even take the trouble to 
disguise themselves anew, like Dr. Fortescue- 
Langley, on each fresh appearance. They 
had every one of them a small white- 
washed mosque, with a couple of tall 
minarets ; and around it spread a number of 
mud-built cottages, looking more like bee- 
hives than human habitations. They had 
also every one of them a group of date-palms, 
overhanging a cluster of mean bare houses ; 
and they all alike had a picturesque and even 
imposing air from a distance, but faded away 
into indescribable squalor as one got abreast 
of them. Our progress was monotonous. 
At twelve, noon, we would pass Aboo-Teeg, 
with its mosque, its palms, its mud-huts, and 
its camels ; then for a couple of hours we 
would go on through - the midst of a 
green field on either side, studded by more 
mud-huts, and backed up by a range of 
grey desert mountains ; only to come at 
2 p.m., twenty miles higher up, upon Aboo- 
Teeg once more, with the same mosque, the 
same mud-huts, and the same haughty camels, 
placidly chewing the same aristocratic cud, 
but under the alias of Koos-kam. After a 
wild hubbub at the quay, we would leave 
Koos-kam behind, with its camels still 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



332 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE, 



serenely munching day before yesterday's 
dinner ; and twenty miles further on, again, 
having passed through the same green plain, 
hacked by the same grey mountains, we 
would stop once more at the identical Koos- 
kam, which this time absurdly described itself 
as Tahtah, But whether it was Aboo-Teeg 
or Koos-kam or Tahtah or anything else, 
only the name differed : it was always the 
same town, and had always the same camels 
at precisely the same stage of the digestive 
process. It seemed to us immaterial whether 
you saw all the Nile or only five milts of 
it. It was just like wall-paper, A sample 
sufficed ; the whole was the sample infinitely 
repeated. 

However, I had my letters to write, and I 
wrote them valiantly. I described the various 
episodes of the complicated digestive process 
in the camel in the minutest detail, I gloated 
over the date-palms, which I knew in three 
days as if I had been brought up upon dates. 
I gave word-pictures of every individual child, 
veiled woman, Arab sheikh, and Coptic 
priest whom we encountered on the voyage. 
And I am op^n to reprint those conscientious 
studies of mud-huts and minarets with any 
enterprising publisher who will make me an 
offer. 

Another disillusion 
weighed upon my soul. 
Before I went up the 
Nile, I had a fancy of my 
own that the bank was 
studded with endless 
ruined temples, whose 
vast red colonnades were 
reflected in the water 
at every turn. I think 
Macaulay's Lays were 
primarily answerable for 
that particular misappre- 
hension. As a matter 
of fact, it surprised me 
to find that we often 
went for two whole days' 
hard steaming without 
ever a temple breaking 
the monotony of those 
eternal date- palms, 
those calm and super- 
ciliously irresponsive 
camels. In my humble 
opinion, Egypt is a 
fraud; there is too much 
Nile — very dirty Nile at that — and not nearly 
enough temple. Besides, the temples, when 
you do come up with them, are just like the 
villages \ they are the same temple over 



again, under a different name each time, and 
they have the same gods, the same kings, 
the same wearisome bas-reliefs, except that 
the gentleman in a chariot, ten feet high, who 
is mowing down enemies a quarter his own 
size, with unsportsmanlike recklessness, is 
called Kameses in this place, and Sethi in 
that, and Amen-hotep in the other. With 
this trifling variation, when you have seen 
one temple, one obelisk, one hieroglyphic 
table, you have seen the whole of Ancient 
Egypt. 

At last, after many days' voyage through 
the same scenery daily — rising in the 
morning off a village with a mosque, ten 
palms, and two minarets, and retiring 
late at night off the same village once 
more, with mosque, palms, and minarets, 
as before, da capo— we arrived one evening 
at a place called Geergeh* In itself, I 
believe, Geergeh did not differ materially 
from all the other places we had passed on 
our voyage : it had its mosque, its ten palms, 
and its two minarets as usual. But I 
remember its name, because something 
mysterious went wrong there with our ma- 
chinery; and the engineer informed us 
we must wait at least three days to mend 




by L^OOgle 



" TOO MVCH Nll.fe 

Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



M/SS CAYLEY'S ADVENTURES. 



335 



never 



it. Dr. Macloghlen's dahabeeah happened 
opportunely to arrive at the same spot 
on the same day ; and he declared with 
fervour he would "see us through our 
throul>leV ? But what on earth were we to do 
with ourselves through three long days and 
nights at Geergeh ? There were the ruins of 
Abydus close at hand, to be sure ; though I 
defy anybody not a professed Egyptologist to 
give more than one day to the ruins of 
Abydus. In this emergency. Dr. Maclnghlen 
came gallantly to our aid. He discovered by 
inquiring from an English-speaking guide 
that there was an unobtrusive oasis, 
visited by Europeans, one long day's 
journey off, across the desert. As a 
rule, it takes at least three days to 
get camels and guides together for 
such an expedition : for Egypt is not 
a land to hurry in, But the indefatig- 
able Doctor further unearthed the 
fact that a sheikh had just come in, 
who (for a consideration) would lend 
us camels for a two days' trip ; and 
we seized the chance to do our duty 
by Mr. Elworthy and the world-wide 
circulation. An unvisited oasis — and 
two Christian ladies to be the first to 
explore it ; there's journalistic enter- 
prise for you ! If we happened to be 
killed^ so much the better for the 
Daily Tckphone. I pictured the 
excitement at Piccadilly Circus. 
" Extra Special, Our Own Corre- 
spondent brutally murdered ! " I 
rejoiced at the opportunity. 

I cannot honestly say that Elsie 
rejoiced with me. She cherished a 
prejudice against camels, massa- 
cres, and the new journalism. 
She didn't like being murdered: 
though this was premature, for 
she had never tried it, She 
objected that the fanatical 
Mohammedans of the Senoosi 
sect, who were said to inhabit 
the oasi^ in question, mighl cut 
our throats for dogs of infidels. 1 pointed 
out to her at some length that it was just that 
chance which added zest to our expedition as 
a journalistic venture : fancy the glory of 
Ikeing the first lady journalists martyred in 
the cause ! But she failed to grasp this aspect 
of the question. However, if I went, she 
would go too, she said, like a dear girl that 
she is : she would not desert me when 1 was 
getting my throat cut; 

Ilr. Macloghlen made the bargain for us, 
and insisted on accompanying us across the 



desert. He told us his method of negotia- 
tion with the Arabs with extreme gusto, 
tl *Is it pay in advance ye want?' says I to 
the dirty beggars : 'divvil a penny will ye get 
till ye bring these ladies safe back to (ieergeh. 
And reminrrber, Mr. Sheikh/ says I, fingering 
me pistol so, by way of emphasis, * we take 
no money wid us ; so if yer friends at Wadi 
Bou choose to cut our throats, 'tis for the 
pleasure of it they'll be cutting them, not for 
anything they'll gain by it. ! i Provisions, 
effendi ? ' says he, salaaming. 'Provisions 
is it ? 3 says L l Take everything yell 
want wid you ; I suppose ye can buy 




EMPHASIS. 



by LiOOglC 



food fit for a Crischun in the bazaar in 
(ieergch ; and never wan [jenny do ye touch 
for it all till ye've landed us on the bank 
again, as safe as ye took us. So if the 
religious sintiments of the faithful at Wadi 
Bou should lade them to hack us to pieces/ 
says I, just waving mv revolver, 'thin 'tis 
yerself that will be out of pocket by it/ And 
the ould divvil cringed as if he took me for 
the Prince of Wales. Faix, 'tis the purse 
that's the best aigumint to catch these 
hay then Arabs upon," 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



334 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE, 



When we set out for the desert in the early 
dawn next day, it looked as if we were start- 
ing for a few months' voyage* We had a 
company of camels that might have befitted a 
caravan. We had two large tents, one for 
ourselves and one for Dr. Maclrjghlen, with 
a third to dine in* We had bedding, and 
cushions, and drinking water tied up in 
swollen pig-skins, which were really goat- 
skins, looking far from tempting* We had 
bread and meat, and a 
supply of presents to soften 
the hearts and weaken the 
religious scruples of the 
sheikhs at Wadi Bou, 
"We thravel en prince" 
said the Doctor, 
When all was 
ready, we got under 
way solemnly, our 
camels rising and 
sniffing the breeze 
with a superior air, 
as who should say, 
" I happen to be 
going where you 
happen to be 
going ; but don't 
for a moment sup- 
pose I do it to 
please you. It is 
mere coincidence. 
You are bound for 
Wadi Bou : I have 
business of my own 
which chances to 
take me there." 

Over the inci- 
dents of the jour- 
ney I draw a veil. 
Riding a camel, I 
find, does not 
greatly differ from 
sea-sickness. They 
are the same phe- 
nomenon under 
altered circum- 
stances* We had been assured beforehand 
on excellent authority that " much of the 
comfort on a desert journey depends upon 
having a good camel." On this matter, 1 am 
no authority* I do not set up as a judge of 
camel-flesh* But I did not notice any of the 
comfort ; so I venture to believe my camel 
must have been an exceptionally bad one* 

We expected trouble from the fanatical 
natives; I am bound to admit, we had most 
trouble with Klsie. She was not insubor- 
dinate, but she did not care for camel-riding* 

Digitized by G* 




A CAMEL UOES NOT GREATLY DIFFRR 
SEA-SICKNESS/' 



And her beast took advantage of her youth 
and innocence, A well-behaved camel should 
go almost as fast as a child can walk, and 
should not sit down plump on the burning 
sand without due reason. Elsie's brute 
crawled, and called halts for prayer at 
frequent intervals ; it tried to kneel like a 
good Mussulman many times a day ; and it 
showed an intolerant disposition to crush the 
infidel by rolling over on top of Elsie. 
Dr. Macloghlen admon- 
ished it with Irish elo- 
quence, not always in 
language intended for 
publication ; but it only 
turned up its supercilious 
lip, and inquired 
in its own un- 
spoken tongue 
what kt knew 
about the desert 
" I feel like a 
wurrum before 
the baste," the 
Doctor said, non- 
plussed. 

If the Nile was 
monotonous, the 
road to Wadi Bou 
was nothing short 
of dreary. We 
crossed a great 
ridge of bare T grey rock, 
and followed a rolling 
valley of sand, scored by 
dry ravines, and baking 
in the sun. It was ghastly 
to look upon* All day 
long, save at the midday 
rest by some brackish 
wells, we rode on and 
on, the brutes stepping 
forward with slow, out- 
stretched legs ; though 
sometimes we walked by 
the camels' sides to vary 
the monotony ; but ever 
through that dreary upland plain, sand in the 
centre, rocky mountain at the edge, and not 
a thing to look at We were relieved towards 
evening to stumble against stunted tamarisks, 
half buried in sand, and to feel we were 
approaching the edge or the oasis* 

When at last our arrogant beasts con- 
descended to stop, in their patronising way, 
we saw by the dim light of the moon a sort 
of uneven basin or hollow, studded with 
date-palms, and in the midst of the depression 
a crumbling walled town, with a whitewashed 
original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



Af/SS CAYLEYS ADVENTURES. 



335 



mosque, two minarets by its side, and a 
crowd of mud houses. It was strangely 
familiar. We had come all this way just to 
see Aboo-Teeg or Koos-kam over again ! 

We camped outside the fortified town that 
night. Next morning we essayed to make our 
entry. 

At first, the servants of the Prophet on 
watch at the gate raised serious objections. 
No infidel might enter. But we had a pass 
from Cairo, exhorting the faithful in the name 
of the Khedive to give us food and shelter ; 
and after much examination and many loud 
discussions, the gatemen passed us. We 
entered the town, and stood alone, three 
Christian Europeans, in the midst of three 
thousand fanatical Mohammedans- 

I confess it was weird. Elsie shrank by 
my side, M Suppose they were to attack us. 
Brownie ? n 

"Thin the sheikh here would never get 
paid," Dr. Macloghlen put in with true Irish 
recklessness. 41 Faix, he'll whistle for his 
money on the whistle I gave him," That 
touch of humour saved us. We laughed ; 
and the people about saw we could laui^h. 
They left off scowling, and pressed around 




"HER AGITATION WAS EVjnjWT, 

byW 



trying to sell us pottery and native brooches. 
In the intervals of fanaticism, the Arab has 
an eye to business. 

We passed up the chief street of the 
bazaar. The inhabitants told us in panto- 
mime the chief of the town was away at 
Asioot, whither he had gone two days ago on 
business. If he were here, our interpreter 
gave us to understand, things might have 
been different ; for the chief had determined 
that, whatever came, no infidel dog should 
settle in his oasis. 

The women with their veiled faces attracted 
us strangely. They were wilder than on the 
river, They ran when one looked at them. 
Suddenly, as we passed one, we saw her give 
a little start. She was veiled like the rest, 
but her agitation was evident even through 
her thick covering, 

"She is afraid of Christians," Elsie cried, 
nestling towards me* 

The woman passed close to us. She never 
looked in our direction, but in a very low 
voice she murmured, as she pasred, " Then 
you are English ! " 

I had presence of mind enough to conceal 

my surprise at this unexpected utterance* 

" Don't seem to notice her, Elsie," 

I said, looking away. " Yes, we are 

English." 

She stopped and pretended to 
examine some jewellery on a stall 
"So am I," she went on, in the 
same suppressed, low voice. "For 
Heaven *s sake, help me!" 
u What are you doing here ? " 
i; I live here— married. I was 
with Gordon's force at Khartoum. 
They carried me off. A mere girl then. 
Now 1 am thirty." 

14 And you have 
been here ever 
since?" 

She turned away 
and walked off, but 
kept whispering be- 
hind her veil We 
followed, unobtru- 
sively. "Yes; I was 
sold to a man at 
Dongola, H e 
passed me on again 
to the chief of this 
oasis, I don't know 
where it is ; but I 
have been here ever 
since, I hate this 
life. Is there any 
chanceof a rescue?" 
Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



33^ 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



"Anny chance; of a rescue, is it?" the 
Doctor broke in, a trifle too ostensibly. " If 
it costs us a whole British Army, me dear 
lady, we'll fetch you away and save you." 

" But oow — to-day ? You won't go away 
and leave me ? You are the first Europeans 
I have seen since Khartoum fell. They may 
sell me again. You will not desert me?" 

"No," I said. "We will not." Then I 
reflected a moment 

What on earth could we do ? This was a 
painful dilemma. If we once lost sight of 
her, we might not see her again. Yet if we 
walked with her openly, and talked like 
friends, we would betray ourselves, and her, 
to those fanatical Senoosis. 

I made my mind up promptly. I may not 
have much of a mind ; but, such as it is, I 
flatter myself I can make it up at a moment's 
notice. 

" Can you come to us outside the gate at 
sunset ? " I asked, as if speaking to Elsie. 

The woman hesitated. " I think so." 

" Then keep us in sight all day, and when 
evening comes, stroll out behind us." 

She turned over some embroidered slip- 
pers on a booth, and seemed to be inspecting 
them. " But my children ? " she murmured, 
anxiously. 

The Doctor interposed. " Is it childern 
she has ? " he asked. " Thin they'll be the 
Mohammedan gintleman's. We mustn't 
interfere wid them. We can take away the 
lady — she's English, and detained against 
her will : but we can't deprive anny man of 
his own childern." 

I was firm, and categorical. "Yes, we 
can," I said, stoutly; "if he has forced a 
woman to bear them to him whether she 
would or not. That's common justice. I 
have no respect for the Mohammedan 
gentleman's rights. Let her bring them 
with her. How many are there ? " 

" Two — a boy and* girl ; not very old ; .the 
eldest is seven." She spoke wistfully. A 
mother is a mother. 

"Then say no more now, but keep us 
always in sight, and we will keep you. Come 
to us at the gate about sundown. We will 
carry you off with us." 

She clasped her hands and moved off with 
the peculiar gliding air of the veiled Moham- 
medan woman. Our eyes followed her. We 
walked on through the bazaar, thinking of 
nothing else now. It was strange how this 
episode made us forget our selfish fears for 
our own safety. Even dear, timid Elsie 
remembered only that an Englishwoman's 
life and liberty were at stake. We kept her 



bydGOgle 



more or less in view all day. She glided in 
and out among the people in the alleys. 
When we went back to the camels at lunch- 
time, she followed us unobtrusively through 
the open gate, and sat watching us from a 
little way off, among a crowd of gazers ; for 
all Wadi Bou was of course agog at this 
unwonted invasion. 

We discussed the circumstance loudly, so 
that she might hear our plans. Dr. Mac- 
loghlen advised that we should tell our sheikh 
we meant to return part of the way to Geergeh 
that evening by moonlight. I quite agreed 
with him. It was the only way out. Besides, 
I didn't like the looks of the people. They 
eyed us askance. This was getting exciting 
now. I felt a professional journalistic interest 
Whether we escaped or got killed, what 
splendid business for the Daily Telephone ! 

The sheikh, of course, declared it was 
impossible to start that evening. The men 
wouldn't move — the camels needed rest But 
Dr. Macloghlen was inexorable. " Very well, 
thin, Mr. Sheikh," he answered, philosophi- 
cally. " Ye '11 plaze yerself about whether ye 
come on wid us or whether ye shtop. That's 
yer own business. But we set out at sun- 
down ; and whin ye return by yerself on 
foot to Geergeh, ye can ask for yer camels at 
the British Consulate." 

All through that anxious afternoon we sat 
in our tents, under the shade of the mud 
wall, wondering whether we could carry out 
our plan or not. About an hour before 
sunset the veiled woman strolled out of 
the gate with her two children. She joined 
the crowd of sight -seers once more, for 
never through the day were we left alone for 
a second. The excitement grew intense. 
Elsie and I moved up carelessly towards the 
group, talking as if to one another. I looked 
hard at Elsie : then I said, as though I were 
speaking about one of the children, " Go 
straight along the road to Geergeh till you 
are past the big clump of palms at the edge 
of the oasis. Just beyond it comes a sharp 
ridge of rock. Wait behind the ridge where 
no one can see you. When we get there," 
I patted the little girl's head, "don't say a 
word, but jump on my camel. My two 
friends will each take one of the children. 
If you understand and consent, stroke your 
boy's curls. We will accept that for a 
signal." 

She stroked the child's head at once with- 
out the least hesitation. Even through her 
veil and behind her dress, I could somehow 
feel and see her trembling nerves, her beating 
heart. But she gave no overt token. She 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



MISS CAYLEYS ADVENTURES. 



337 



merely turned and muttered something care- 
lessly in Arabic to a woman beside her. 

We waited once niore> in long-drawn 
suspense. Would she manage to escape 
them ? Would they suspect her motives? 

After ten minutes, when we had returned to 
our crouch ing-place under the shadow of the 
wall, the woman detached herself slowly from 
the group, and began strolling with almost 
overdone nonchalance along the road to 
Geergeh. We could see the little girl 
was frightened and seemed to expostulate 
with her mother : fortunately, the Arabs 
about were too much occupied in watching 
the suspicious strangers to notice this episode 
of their own people. Presently, our new 
friend disappeared ; and, with beating hearts, 
we awaited the sunset. 

Then came the usual scene of hubbub 
with the sheikh, the camels, the porters, and 
the drivers. It was eagerness against apathy. 
With difficulty we made them understand we 
meant to get under way at all hazards. I 
stormed in bad Arabic. The Doctor in- 
veighed in very choice Irish. At last they 
yielded, and set out. One 
by one the camels rose* 
bent their slow knees, and 
began to stalk in their lordly 
way with outstretched necks 
along the road to the river 
We moved through 
the palm groves, a 
crowd of boys follow- 
ing us and shouting 
for backsheesh. We 
began to be afraid 
they would accompany 
us too far and dis- 
cover our fugitive ; 
but fortunately they 
all turned back with 
one accord at a little 
whitewashed shrine 
near the edge of the 
oasis. We reached 
the clump of palms ; 
we turned the corner of the ridge. Had we 
missed one another? No ! There, crouching 
by the rocks, with her children by her side, 
sat our mysterious stranger. 

The Doctor was equal to the emergency. 
" Make those bastes kneel ' n he cried 
authoritatively to the sheikh* 

The sheikh was taken aback, This was a 
new exploit burst upon him. He Hung his 
arms up, gesticulating wildly. The Doctor, 
unmoved, made the drivers understand by 
some strange pantomime what he wanted. 

Vol. xvi.— 43. 



They nodded, half terrified. In a second, 
the stranger was by my side, Elsie had taken 
the girl, the Doctor the boy, and the camels 
were passively beginning to rise again. That 
is the best of your camel. Once set him on 
his road, and he goes mechanically. 

The sheikh broke out with several loud 
remarks in Arabic, which we did not 
understand, but whose hostile character could 
not easily escape us. He was beside himself 
with anger. Then I was suddenly aware of 
the splendid advantage of having an Irish- 
man on our side. Dr. Maeloghlen drew his 
revolver, like one well used to such episodes, 
and pointed it full at the angry Arab. 
14 Look here, Mr + Sheikh," he said, calmly, 
yet with a fine touch of bravado; "do ye 
see this revolver ? Well, unless ye make yer 
camels thravel sthraight to Geergeh widout 
wan other wurrud, 'tis yer own brains will be 
spattered, sor ? on the sand of this desert! And 
if ye touch wan hair of our heads, ye'll answer 
for it wid yer life to the British Government 11 




byG* 



CROUCHING UY THE RUCKS SAT OUR .MYSTERIOUS STRANGER." 



I do not fed sure that the sheikh com- 
prehended the exact nature of each word 
in this comprehensive threat, hut I am 
certain he took in its gene ml meaning, 
punctuated as it was with some flourishes of 
the revolver. He turned to the drivers and 
made a gesture of despair. It meant, 
apparently, that this infidel was too much 
for him. Then he called out a few sharp 
directions in Arabic. Next minute, our 
camels' le^s were stepping out briskly along 
the road to Geergeh with a promptitude which 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



33« 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



I'm sure must have astonished their owners. 
We rode on and on through the gloom in 
a fever of suspense. Had any of the 
Senoosis noticed our presence ? Would they 
miss the chief's wife before long, and follow 
us under arms ? Would our own sheikh 
betray us ? I am no coward, as women go, 
but I confess, if it had not been for our 
fiery Irishman, I should have felt my heart 
sink. We were grateful to him for the reck- 
less and good-humoured courage of the 
untamed Celt. It kept us from giving way. 
" Ye'll take notice, Mr. Sheikh," he said, as 
we threaded our way among the moon-lit 
rocks, " that I have twinty-wan cartridges in 
me case for me revolver ; and that if there's 
throuble to-night 'tis twinty of them there'll 
be for your frinds the Senoosis, and wan for 
yerself; but for fear of disappointing a 
gintleman, 'tis yer own special bullet I'll 
disthribute first, if it comes to fighting." 

The sheikh's English was a vanishing 
quantity, but to judge by the way he nodded 
and salaamed at this playful remark, I am 
convinced he understood the Doctor's Irish 
quite as well as I did. 

We spoke little by the way ; we were all far 
too frightened, except the Doctor, who kept 
our hearts up by a running fire of wild 
Celtic humour. But I found time meanwhile 
to learn by a few questions from our veiled 
friend something of her captivity. She had 
seen her father massacred before her eyes at 
Khartoum, and had then been sold away to 
a merchant, who conveyed her by degrees 
and by various exchanges across the desert 
through lonely spots to "the Senoosi oasis. 
There she had lived all those years with 
the chief to whom her last purchaser had 
trafficked her. She did not even know that 
her husband's village was an integral part of 
the Khedive's territory ; far less that the 
English were now in practical occupation of 
Egypt. She had heard nothing and learnt 
nothing since that fateful day ; she had waited 
in vain for the off-chance of a deliverer. 

" But did you never try to run away to the 
Nile ? " I cried, astonished. 

" Run away ? How could 1 ? I did not 
even know which way the river lay ; and was 
it possible for me to cross the desert on foot, 
or find a chance of a camel? The Senoosis 
would have killed me. Even with you, to 
help me, see what dangers surround me ; 
alone, I should have perished, like Hagar in 
the wilderness, with no angel to save me." 

" An' ye've got the angel now," Dr. Mac- 
loghlen exclaimed, glancing at me. " Steady, 
there, Mr. Sheikh. What's this that's coming?" 



by LiOOgle 



It was another caravan, going the opposite 
way, on its road to the oasis ! A voice 
halloaed from it. 

Our new friend clung tight to me. " My 
husband ! " she whispered, gasping. 

They were still far off on the desert, 
and the moon shone bright. A few 
hurried words to the Doctor, and with 
a wild resolve we faced the emergency. 
He made the camels halt, and all of us, 
springing off, crouched down behind their 
shadows in such a way that the coming 
caravan must pass on the far side of us. 
At the same moment the Doctor turned 
resolutely to the sheikh. " Ix>ok here, Mr. 
Arab," he said in a quiet voice, with one more 
appeal to the simple Volapuk of the pointed 
revolver ; " I cover ye wid this. I^t these 
frfnds of yours go by. If there's anny un- 
necessary talking betwixt ye, or anny throuble 
of anny kind, remimber, the first bullet goes 
sthraight as an arrow trough that haythen 
head of yours ! " 

The sheikh salaamed more submissively 
than ever. 

The caravan drew abreast of us. We 
could hear them cry aloud on either side 
the customary salutes : " In Allah's name, 
peace ! " answered by " Allah is great ; there 
is no god but Allah." 

Would anything more happen? Would 
our sheikh play us false ? It was a moment 
of breathlessness. We crouched and cowered 
in the shade, holding our hearts with fear, 
while the Arab drivers pretended to be 
unsaddling the camels. A minute or two 
of anxious suspense ; then, peering over our 
beasts' backs, we saw their long line filing off 
towards the oasis. We watched their turbaned 
heads, silhouetted against the sky, disappear 
slowly. One by one they faded away. The 
danger was past. With beating hearts we 
rose up again. 

The Doctor sprang into his place and 
seated himself on his camel. " Now ride on, 
Mr. Sheikh," he said, " wid all yer men, as if 
grim death was afther ye. Camels or no 
camels, ye've got to march all night, for ye'll 
never draw rein till we're safe back at 
Geergeh ! " 

And sure enough we never halted, under 
the persuasive influence of that loaded 
revolver, till we dismounted once more in the 
early dawn upon the Nile bank, under British 
protection. 

Then Elsie and I and our rescued country- 
woman broke down together in an orgy of 
relief. We hugged one another and cried 

like so many children. 

Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



The Pleasure Telephone. 

By Arthur Mee. 




REAMS are fulfilled very 
rapidly in these days, but even 
Mr. Bellamy himself would 
doubtless have been amazed 
to know that one of his most 
daring predictions is on the eve 
of realization. Mr. Bellamy, in that remark- 
ably prophetic book, u Looking Backward/' 
wrote, ten years ago, of a young man who 
was amazed by hearing charming music in a 
room in which there was 
neither musician nor in- 
strument, and who was 
still further surprised to 
be told that the music 
was supplied " on the co- 
operative principle." The 
reply of his hostess is so 
absolutely prophetic that 
it is worth quoting here : — 
** * Wait a moment, 
please/ said Edith ; c I 
want to have you listen to 
this waltz before you ask 
any questions* I think it 
is perfectly charming/ and 
as she spoke the sound of 
violins filled the room with 
witchery of summer night. 
When this had also ceased, 
she said : 'There is nothing 
in the least mysterious 
about the music, as you 
seem to imagine. We have 
simply carried the idea of 
labour-saving by co-opera- 
tion into our musical ser- 
vice as into everything else. 
There are a number of 
music-rooms in the city, 
perfectly adapted acoustically to the different 
sorts of music. These halls are connected 
by telephone with all the houses of the city 
whose people care to pay the small fee, and 
there are none, you may be sure, who do 
not. The corps of musicians attached to 
each hall is so large that, although no indi- 
vidual performer, or group of performers, has 
more than a brief part, each day's programme 
lasts through the twenty-four hours. There 
are on that card for to-day, as you will see if 
you observe closely, distinct programmes of 

Digitized by G* 



four of these concerts, each of a different 
order of music from the others, being now 
simultaneously performed, and any one of 
the four pieces now going on that you prefer 
you can hear by merely pressing the button 
which will connect your house wire with the 
hall where it is being rendered. The pro- 
grammes are so co-ordinated that the pieces 
at any one time simultaneously proceeding in 
the different halls usually offer a choice, not 




THE AFTERNOON CONCERT, 

only between instrumental and vocal, and 
between different sorts of instruments^ but 
also between different motives, from grave to 
gay T so that all tastes and moods can be 
suited. 7 " 

It is probable that before the dawn of the 
twentieth century this prophetic picture will 
have been surpassed in actual fact, and the 
telephone will be a quite indispensable 
element in English social life* But it will be 
a much more comprehensive and effective 
instrument than the telephone as we know it 
Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



340 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 




THF. JUtKA AT IMME. 

at present, and the likelihood is that it will 
be fitted in our houses just as gas or 
electricity is now. It will be so 
cheap that not to have it would 
be absurd, and it will be so enler 
taining and useful that it will make 
life happier all rounds and brin^ 
the pleasures of society to the 
doors of the artisan's cottage. 

That, indeed, will be the unique 
feature of the Pleasure Telephone. 
It will make millions merry 
who have never been merry 
before, and will democratize, 
if we may so write, many of 
the social luxuries of the 
rich. Those who object to 
the environment of the stage 
will be able to enjoy the 
theatre at home, and ihe 
fashionable concert will be 
looked forward to as eagerly 
by the poor as by their 
wealthy neighbours. The 
humblest cottage will be in 
immediate contact with the 
city T and the " private wire y 
will make all classes kin. 



The honour of 
pioneering this revolu- 
tion does not belong to 
England or America. 
The inventor of the 
Pleasure Telephone is 
a native of Hungary, 
where, For two years, 
he has been demon- 
strating the soundness 
of his invention with 
great success. The 
capital of the Hun- 
garian Empire is the 
only place in the 
world where the Pleasure Telephone has 
been in operation, and the restrictions placed 
on the enterprise by the authorities of Kuda- 
Pesth have not tended to popularize the 
instrument, or de%'e!op it fairly. But the ex- 
>eriment has been sufficiently successful to 
justify an effort on a wider scale and in a 
wider field. The new telephone is to be 
brought to London, and at the present 
moment arrangements are being made for its 
installation in the Metropolis, 

Though the telephone is likely to effect 
immense changes, and will no doubt create 
something like a sensation when introduced 
into this country, its installation is realty a 
very simple thing. Indeed, the whole rami- 
fications of the Pleasure Telephone --carrying 
business and pleasure into the homes of 




by 



Google 



THEST °8rtTOlfrom 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



THE PLEASURE TELEPHONE. 



34* 



thousands, and making next-door nrigbhonrs, 
as it were, of strangers who have never met — 
will be conducted in one single room by one 
single man. The power of resistance of the 
telephone is said to be enormous, and the 
inventor has declared that it would he possi- 
ble with its aid for one man's voice to be 
heard simultaneously by the whole six million 
inhabitants of London. All that is necessary 
is a central office, from which the whole of 
London — if not the whole of England — 
might be supplied with a constant flow of 
news and pleasure all day long. 

It is proposed that the present telephone 
machinery shall be largely used in connection 



^eO" 




with the Pleasure Telephone, the 
only addition necessary being a 
new main wire, with which each 
subscriber will be connected. 
The wire now in use in Buda- 
Pesth is 1 68 miles long, and 
carries sound as distinctly at 
the extreme end as an ordinary 
private wire in thi^ country. 
There are 6, coo persons de- 
pendent on the wire, but, unlike 
our own telephone, a stoppage 
at one station — "station" 
signifying a subscriber's house — 
does not affect the main wire, and the rest of 
the subscribers are not interfered with. 

Each subscriber has a time-table of the 
various items which will be telephoned 
during the day, Beginning as early as half- 
past eight in the morning, every hour is 
amply provided for as long as there is any- 
thing going on in the city. At half-past 
eight the subscriber is given the substance of 
the principal telegrams received throughout 
the night, which are condensed so as to be 
delivered In a quarter of an hour. Only the 
main facts are given J such as generally satisfy 
the average man thus early in the day, but in 
case any of the news is sensational the fresh 
telegrams are transmitted as they arrive later 

Digitized by G* 



on. After this foreign matter comes the 
news of the capital, with a programme of the 
day's events, and at nine o'clock news of an 
official nature is given, A little later — after 
a pause for breakfast — follows a concise 
review of the principal papers, with the 
substance of the leading articles. This lasts 
half an hour, and is followed by reports on 
the opening of the stock and corn exchanges. 
The subscriber who is not interested in 
these matters has only to put down his 
receivers and wait a few minutes for the local 
news, the theatrical^ art, or science notices, 
or the ecclesiastical intelligence. Next come 
the latest foreign, provincial, and sporting 
information, and all kinds of society and 
political matter. 

The morning having been devoted to an 
exhaustive study of all the papers, the after- 
noon is spent mainly in keeping subscribers 
up to date concerning current events, which 
are frequently dispatched within a few 
minutes of the actual 
occurrence. Parlia- 
mentary reports are given 
at brief intervals, and the 
speech of a Minister is 
often transmitted through- 
out the capital while the 
Minister is still speaking. 
In London, for instance, 
under this system, the 
substance of the Budget 
speech would be known 
in thousands of houses 
before the Chancellor of 
the Exchequer had sat 
down, and it would be 
quite possible to acquaint 
every subscriber with the 
result of an important 
division five minutes 
after the figures were 
announced in the House. The same with 
the result of an exciting election. And this 
news not only comes with extraordinary 
promptness, but it is brought to one's own 
fireside, without the trouble of junning into 
the street for the paper. 

But the name of the telephone — its full 
description is the "News and Entertainment 
Telephone "—implies that the instrument is 
not monopolized by news. Perhaps the most 
popular feature of it is its connection with the 
theatres, concert halls, and the hundred and 
one other places of amusement in the city. 
It is not necessary that sound should he 
conveyed directly into the telephone. The 
transmitter has only to be within sound of the 
Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 




Al,T P THE HJ>NLKS, 



342 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 




CHICK ET NEWS AT THE CLITB. 



singer to carry the song along the scores of 
miles of wire. By special arrangement, the 
great concerts in the 
Hungarian capital are 
sometimes listened to 
throughout the whole of 
the empire 3 or even 
beyond its borders. A 
song sung in Ruda-Pesth 
has heen h^ard with re- 
markable distinctness in 
Berlin and other great 
cities, and there seems 
to be no limit to possi- 
bility in this direction. 
At night the subscriber is 
taken round the theatres, 
each being visited in turn, 
and weary folk may allow 
themselves to be lulled to 
sleep by the strains of 
some pretty melody sung 
a hundred miles away. 

So popular has the 
Pleasure Telephone be- 
come in Buda-Pesth that 
it has found its way into 
every public place of 
importance. There is not 
a public building m the 



capital where it is not in 
operation, and even the 
churches have not 
objected to it, as our 
illustrations show. The 
preacher of Buda - Pesth 
no longer reckons his 
hearers by the state of 
the pews, but by the 
number of telephone 
subscribers. It may be 
objected, perhaps, that 
religious worship by tele- 
phone is not calculated 
to inspire reverence or 
inculcate virtue ; but, at 
any rate, the system is an 
inestimable boon to the 
aged and infirm, the 
patients in hospitals, and 
the women who are unable 
to leave their houses, A 
single hospital in Buda- 
Pesth has over thirty 
installations, which carry 
brightness and cheer into 
the lives of the lonely sick. 
No hotel in the capital 
can afford to be without 
the instrument, which has become, in fact, 
practically indispensable, and is found not 




by Google 



HALF-TIME. 

Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



THE PLEASURE TELEPHONE. 



343 




emergency signal, by which 
all subscribers are M rung 
up" on the receipt of any 
special news. 

Though the communi- 
cation between the central 
office and the subscribers is 
really very simple, it necessi- 
tates an enormous amount 
of preparatory labour. In 
many ways, the routine of 
the office resembles that of a 
newspaper, there being a staff 
of law, police, parliamentary, 
and news reporters, all of whom 
hand in their ''copy" to the 
editor. The whole of the 
matter to be sent through is 
approved by the editor before 
it can be handed over to the 
"speaker," who speaks it into 
the instrument The "speaker" 
must, of course, possess a 
strong, clear voice, and in 
order that the message may 
be perfectly distinct, no 
single speaker is on duty 



FIRESIOft StKMONi. 



only in private houses and hospitals, but 

in doctors' waiting-rooms, barbers' shops, 

coffee-houses, clubs, and business offices 

of all kinds. Waiting is never tedious in 

Buda-Pesth : there is always 

something to interest the 

waiter, Half the trifling 

irritations of life disappear 

under the soothing influence 

of this universal distributer 

of pleasure, 

It may be urged against 
the Pleasure Telephone that 
the subscriber has either to 
keep the receiver at his ears 
all day long, or miss half 
the news, but that objection 
is answered by the existence 
of the programme. Every- 
thing is transmitted in strict 
accordance with the pro- 
gramme, so that each sub- 
scriber knows exactly when 
his interesting items are 
coming. But lest important 
items of news should be 
missed, a summary of all 
the news is given at noon 
and again in the evening. 
There is also an ingeniou 




lious.^ 

byt^-OOgH 



TH f:fR!iTi%lfrorT 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



344 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE, 



more than two hours at a 
time. 

The most wonderful 
feature of the Pleasure 
Telephone is its cheap- 
ness, So trivial is the 
outlay connected with it 
that the charge to sub 
scribers is only a penny a 
day, or 30s, a year — 
ridiculously cheap when 
compared with the cost of the 
ordinary telephone, There are two 
receivers for each subscriber, to 
render the message more distinctly, 
each receiver being about the size of 
a watch. They are attached to long 
cords, so that they may be moved to 
any part or the room. So anxious 
are the telephonists for the comfort 
of the subscribers, that the two re- 
ceivers can be attached to a light 
spring arrangement which holds 
them firmly over the ears, thus 
relieving the hands, and making it 
possible to walk about or lie down 
while listening to what is going on in 
the city. It is perhaps unnecessary to men- 
tion that subscribers can only hear through 




SLNDAV I ft THE HCttlTTAL. 




T !(■■- UAkKJAOl: SKKVJCI. A] limit. 

oyGoOgk 



the telephone and not speak back in return. 
The telephone is, of course, non-political, all 
controversial news being imparted 
with strict impartiality. Original 
articles of general interest are some- 
times read t with occasional shnrt 
stories* 

There are, of course, unlimited 
possibilities in the new telephone. 
It is quite possible that concert 
managers and theatrical proprietors 
will object to the instrument, Hut 
the probability is much 
the other way. The news- 
papers of Buda - Pesth 
persistently boycotted the 
invention on its introduc- 
tion, but they recognise 
now that, instead of being 
taken as a substitute for 
the newspaper, its effect 
is to whet the appetite 
of the public for details 
1*\* ot ^ v ™ts announced 

?TV briefly through the tele- 

\ phone. The theatres, too, 

realize that to give the 
public a snatch or two 
from a favourite opera 
gratis has not, in the long 
run, an adverse effect on 
the receipts, and they in- 
Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



THE PLEASURE TELEPHONE. 



345 



variably support the instrument Should the 
worst come to the worst, however, it is always 
possible to organize concerts and entertain- 
ments in the editorial office ; and for an 
insignificant outlay on the part of each sub- 
scriber, it would not be by any means an 
impossible or unprofitable thing for the pn> 
prietors of the telephone to organize a 
concert* at which the cream of British 
vocalists should sing. Mr, Bellamy's pre- 
diction of a central hall of music with a 



football field, which will keep us acquainted 
minute by minute with the whereabouts of 
the ball and the prospect^ of the teams* 
There is, indeed, no element in our social life 
which will be unprovided Tor, and if, as it is 
said to be not unlikely in the near future — 
the principle of sight is applied to the tele- 
phone as well as that of sound, earth will 
be in truth a paradise, and distance will 
lose its enchantment by being abolished 
altogether. 

Where finality is to be reached in this 
matter is not known. Nothing that has been 




twenty -four hours' programme is by no 
means impossible of realization* Patti and 
Padcrewski may yet entertain us in our own 
drawing-rooms, and the luxuries of princes 
may be at the command of us all 

Who knows but that in time we may sit in 
our arm-choirs listening to the speeches of 
Her Majesty's Ministers, or allow ourselves 
to be soothed into blissful unconsciousness 
by a Parliamentary debate on bimetallism ? 
There would be 5 at any rate, one blessing 
in this— the problem of the Ladies' Grille 
would be solved for ever. Then in the cricket 
season we shall follow our favourite wiclders 
of the willow without risking cold or sun- 
stroke, and all the unpleasantness of winter 
travelling will be avoided in the football 
season by the fixing of a telephone on the 



THE CKILUHEN S LKCTUHE. 



Vol. xvl- 



by Google 



tried yet has failed, and it is confidently 
stated that a single wire would carry the 
same sound over the whole United Kingdom, 
if not beyond the seas, Whether this claim is 
exaggerated or not, time alone will prove ; 
but at any rate the Pleasure Telephone opens 
out a vista of infinite charm which few prophets 
oF to-day have dreamed of, and who dare to 
say that in twenty years the electric miracle 
will not bring all the corners of the earth to 
our own fireside? 

Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



Curiosities.* 



[ We shall be glad to receive Cmiributwm to this section ^ and to pay for such as are accepted. ] 

WORN AWAY BY WHEAT. 
This photo, shows a board in the posses- 
sion of the Rev- Orr Bennett, of Hawkes- 
bury, Ontario, Canada. The board was 
taken from I he lower side of a square 
spout, used for conveying wheat in the 
Cameron Grist Mill, at Hawkesbury. The 
hundreds and thousands of bushels of 
wheat that travelled swiftly through the 
inclined spout gradually wore the board 




A CURIOUS HOUR-GLASS. 
1 1 is at Hurst Church, near T ivy ford, Berks, that I his very 
curious hour-glass is to he seen. It was placed close to the 
pulpit more than two centuries ago as a check en the parson 1 s 
verbosity. And here it has remained uniil this day, most 
probably a lasting memorial of a 1 wired parishioner, whose 
initials are woven in the ironwork beneath the date (1636). 
We are indebted for this interesting photograph to Mrs. D. 
Brought on, 4, Embankment, Bedford. 




WHAT THK SKIVER PIPE Dm 
In July of last year a heavy thunderstorm did a great deal of 
damage in the North of London, and the snap-shot here repro- 
duced shows the spot 
where a big main sewer 
pipe burst, and forced 
the asphalt and pavirig- 
stones up into the re- 
markable position shown. 
The water was shot up 
to the height of the 
houses, and flooded the 
mad fur a considerable 
distance. So great was 
the havoc wrought at 
the place shown in the 
photo., that one could 
not believe h without 
such evidence as the 
snap-shot affords* It is 
Mr. P. Ehrenfeld, of 3, 
Brabant Court, Phil pot 
Lane, E.C, who sent 
the photo, to us. 

* Copyright, 1698, by George Newnes, Limited- 



in some places to a mere shell, whilst in 
other places holes were actually bored 
right through. The hard and knotty 
parts, however, were but slightly affected 
by the incessant passage of the grain, these 
remaining standing in high relief, giving 
the effect of rich carving. 




rncs. Limited. 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



CURIOSITIES. 



357 



MR. GLADSTONE 
CARICATURED 
ON A CATHE- 
DRAL. 

Of al] the thou- 
sands of caricatures 
of Mr* Gladstone 
extant, there is 
perhaps none more 
remarkable and 
unique than the 
one depicted in this 
photo., which 
represents part of 
the walls of Chester 
Cathedral. Here 
we see a corbel of 
striking design on 
one of the outside 
walls of the south 
transept. It is at 
once noticeable for 
the prominence 






t 






given to a piece of sculpture representing Mr. Glad- 
stone's familiar lineaments. It was executed at the 
restoration of the cathedral some twenty years ago* 
and is typical of the strife existing in the Church at 
the time. With pen in mouth, the G.O.M. is depicted 
overthrowing or disestablishing the Church of Ireland, 
which is distinguished by a triple -crowned mitre, 

A PUG WORTH TWENTY THOUSAND DOLLARS, 
You are surprised at this. WtU t the pug certainly 
looks surprised ; but then he is a curiosity, and was 
sent in by Mr. Albert Appleby, Witham, Essex, 
The explanation is very simple, because the pug re- 
presents 2Q,O00dols + in paper money — greenback noles 
of the U.S. Government, which have been pulped and 
then moulded in this way, and sold as a curiosity. 



A " BULL'S-EYE" STAMP. 
Mr, John Vineyeomb, of Holy wood. 
County Down, writes as follows : " Here 
is a really genuine * bull's-eye* of the 
post-office letter stamp* Considering the 
haphazard way in which the stamping is 
done, it is almost a unique occurrence to 
find a letter or post -card fairly and 
squarely thumped. I think the stamper 
of this at the Teenies Post Office should 
be awarded some recognition as the 
champion accurate stamper, I feel sure 
that this will draw the attention of the 
hundreds of thousands of the readers of 
The Strand Magazine to the stamp- 
ing of letters, and they will find that not 
one out of the millions stamped daily is a 
4 bull's-eye,'" 





From a Fhafo. htf Mr. ifcitctey, lfuhlix- 



" TAKEN FROM ABOVE." 
Mr. Ernes!. F. Phillips "** Upcolt House, St, 
Alljans, writes ; '* As The Strand seems fond of 
photographic curiosities, I inclose one of myself 
taken in the Riviera last year. To me there is 
nothing strange in the pose beyond reducing my 
6ft, 4in* of stature to insignificance. I am standing 
upon the balcony of an hotel, and the snap-shot was 
taken with a Kodak camera from another balcony 
high a hove me." This is the most curious of 
the " taken -from -above " photographs we have 
yet seen, 

"IVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



348 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 




Ffiriti a Photo, bit] 



THE HAM PS IE AD TRH'LETS, 



[Porter fftvw., H&mpMttwL 



Doris, who is but twelve, says : " I am send- 
ing you the photograph of another set of 
triplets which I hope you will put in The 
Strand Magazine. The triplets 1 names are 
Ernest Alfred Nichols, Amelia Diamond 
Alice Nichols, and Frederick Robey Nichols- 
Mr. and Mrs Nichols live at one of the 
Mount Vernon Cottages, Hampstead, N,W. 
The accompanying photograph was taken 
when the triplets were 
eleven months old, by 
Porter Brothers, 
Hampstead. The trip- 
lets are now sixteen 
months old, and have 
just recovered from a 
bad attack of whoop- 
ing cough. They were 
very delicate when 
they were three 
months old, but as 
they have so success- 
fully recovered it is 
likely that they will 
easily recover from 
other illnesses. They 
are now healthy child- 
ren, one boy being 
already able to stand/' 
Mr. Henry E. Millar 
writes on the back of 
his little daughter's 
note : " She is anxious 
lo get something for 
the parents of the 
triplets, who are only 
working people, and 
can ill afford the ex- 




pense involved. 
The father is a 
plumber's la- 
bourer/' Let us 
hope that the trifle 
which we may 
send to this little 
girl may make 
three children 
happier, and, per- 
haps, lead to 
better things. 

It is generally 
supposed that all 
triplets born in 
Great Britain are 
the recipients of 
a small amount 
from the Queen's 
Bounty, and in the 
newspapers we 
may periodically note the statement that 
Mr, and Mrs. So-and-so have had the honour 
of receiving such a grant. The general 
statement is, however, unfortunately untrue. 
The bounty for triplets is customarily 
given only to those people in medium or 
poor circumstances. We have knowledge of 
a very well-to-do gentleman in Surrey 
whose home a short time ago was glad- 
dened by the advent 
of two little boys 
and a girl. Simply in 
order to celebrate the 
occasion and to give 
the children some- 
thing of which they 
might be proud in 
after years, the gentle- 
man applied to the 
proper authorities for 
the bounty, but was 
refused owing to the 
fact that he had no 
pressing need for the 
money. This, ofcourse, 
is as it should be ; 
but if the bounty were 
systematically award- 
ed for every trio of 
children born at one 
time, it would be fairly 
easy to get informa- 
tion as to the total 
number of triplets 
born every year — a 
thing not easily to be 
verified at the present 






Tfffi?'ERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



CURIOSITIES, 



359 



A CURTOUS PHOTOGRAPH. 
Mr. J + White* of Deny Lawn, 
Rathgar^ Dublin, writes : "This is a 
snap-shot of a party of friends who 
were getting out of a saloon carriage 
on the G,S. and W. Railway between 
Dublin and Killarney. When develop- 
ing the negative I thought the plate 
had been exposed twice, especially as 
I remembered that the saloon carriage 
was in the centre of a. long train, and 
that there were several carriages 
behind that would shut out the view f 
wilh the bridge on the left. What 
happened was this. The day was a 
dull one, and the figures with the, 
bridge in the background were reflected 
in the large glass window r of the saloon 
carriage, the white lines being caused 
by the reflection of light frtrni the 
varnished panels below the window. 
If you close one eye, and look with 
the other at the photograph through 
a tube made by the fingers, you will 
see exactly how the effect is produced," 





m ^ \_^^m 






MB " 9 1% M p^W 




ILLUMINATIONS BY NIGHT* 
The remarkable photograph here given represents 
the illuminations at Messrs. Shoolbred's well -known 
establishment on the night of June 22nd, 1897, wdien 
the picture itself was taken. In the original there were 
streaks of light visible proceeding from the left-hand 
side, and these were the rays projected from an electric 
lantern on the roof of Messrs. Maple, op|x>site. The 
photo, was taken l>etween eleven and twelve at night, 
an exposure of forty minutes being allowed. The 
operator, Mr. T. McLeish, of 69, Valsover Street, \\Y, 
used a multiple-coated plate. 



A HAIRBREADTH ESCAPE. 
Here is an extremely interesting photograph sent in 
by Mr. W. J I. Sanderson, of Guishorougb, It seems 
that Mr, W, T. Harrison, a painter and decorator, 
etc. t of Guisborough, secured the contract for the 
decoration of the Alexandra Hotel at Salt hum, and 



was there at work some weeks ago during a very 
heavy gale. Mr. Harrison was stooping over and 
mixing some distem[>er in a bucket for one of his men t 
who was standing within a few feet of him, when a 
huge heavy slate was blown from the roof of the hotel 
and struck the bucket precisely as we see it in the 
photograph. You will observe that the slate has cut 
the bucket down to the iron hoop, which it bent out- 
wards, and which in its turn cut a hole in the slate 
3j£in. deep, Although the slate did not actually touch 
Mr. Harrison's head, yet he felt it whla by him within 
an inch or two. Had the slate struck him he would, 
of course, have been instantly killed. 




vol 



-^ 



VERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



35° 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



abstainers. Previous to our birth twins were great success we have decided to inaugurate 

born, so that the family increased rather a new feature called *' Portraits of Triplets at 

rapidly. Our father and mother are both Different Ages," to run for one issue only, 

alive and well, and are in the seventy-sixth Our first instalment is seen on this page, 

year of their age," The copy of the Queen's and we may here state that it will give no 

letter, to which Mr. slight pleasure to our 

Mayes refers, is dated ~ 1 readers if they will 

Balmoral, September carefully study the 

17 th, 1884, and reads faces of these beautiful 

as follows : " General and thriving children 

Sir Henry Ponsonby as they advance in 

is commanded by the years. The children 

Queen to thank Mr. ^^^^^m^r^k here shmv]1 were P ll0 ~ 

Mayes for the photo- |A tographed by Messrs. 

graph of his three ^m ^^ Travers and Co., of 

children born in 1863, W^ ' i" 43 ' Plashet Lane, 

who, Her Majesty is J^±~ r '-j&r> t^ Upton Park, who have 

glad to learn, are well ** l^^tf k^^^jjl W^ T^ sent us the prints. Mr 

and prospering. " W^^ Travers writes : " I 

In dealing with am sending you two 

such a large and photographs of triplet 

numerous subject as girls taken by us. The 

triplets, it is difficult _ carte-de-visite was 

r. f Y 14,l, " Mlv tHK CADIJV TRIPLETS OF STRATI- (>KO— AGBD I J SIOKTHS. , 

to know whether to mm */ j a-^ a* r™w™ <*{*>,, veto* Part. taken on March nth, 



reject some of the 

photographs or to insert them all. But after 
due deliberation we have decided upon 
rejection in order that foreign countries may 
not get an exaggerated idea of the population 
of Great Britain. Yet we feel that in so 
doing we are depriving the aforesaid foreign 
countries of a 
great benefit. No 
country, we dare 
to assert, could 
gaze upon the 
bonny faces in 
these photo- 
graphs without a 
feeling akin to 
jealousy. We feel 
sure that French- 
men with their 
aesthetic natures 
would appreciate 
the pictures* But 
we must pass on 
to another inter- 
esting variation 
of the subject. 
Since the incep- 
tion of the Maga- 
zine our readers 
have been fa- 
mil iar with our 
.portraits of cele- 
brities at different 
ages, and on ac- 
count of their 




(I fir- ^.AUIIT I Kill. J'. I .-■ Mr 



1895, their ages then 
being thirteen months. We advertised a 
* free baby day/ and the mother brought 
them (amongst nearly three hundred other 
babies) to have a free photo. The cabinet 
was recently taken, and the children are 
strong and healthy girls. They are now 

over four years 
of age. Their 
parents^ Mr. and 
Mrs, Cadby, live 
at 35, Langthorne 
Road, West Ham 
I.ane, Stratford, 
E." Mrs, Cadby 
has had twins 
before the triplets 
were born, and in 
all twelve child- 
ren, eight of 
whom are living. 
Four weeks be- 
fore the birth of 
the triplets she 
lost a little boy 
and the twins, so, 
you see, the trip- 
lets came as a 
gracious gift to 
fill the vacant 
places in the 
Cadby home," 
May these little 
girls live long and 
prosper. 



TW E CADI1V TRjl PtMTS OK STRATFORD- AQEjl jA. j l r 






i tt>. a l r }Ami Park. 

YERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



(""rw^nL'' Original from 

by VjUU^IC UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 




™ MACIC 

Blessing 

From the Russian, 




ANY thousand years ago there 
lived in the Hundred and 
First Kingdom a rich merchant 
who had an only son named 
Axim. Now, it so happened 
that in the middle of the 
kingdom in which they lived were a num- 
ber of swampy which no one was able to 
traverse ; this was particularly annoying, 
as it did away with what might have been 
a very agreeable short cut ; as it was, the 
inhabitants w T ere obliged to travel by a very 
roundabout way, and no one had sufficient 
energy to alter this state of affairs, until our 
friend the merchant determined to set to 
work with his son to make a road straight 
across. They mentioned this idea to no one, 
but took a small house close to the swamps 
and started working. They worked and 
worked for days and nights, until in due time 
all was ready, and the people of the kingdom 
were very agreeably surprised one fine morning 
on seeing a lovely straight road where formerly 
there had been nothing but swamps. 

One day as Axim was taking a constitu- 
tional along the road, he saw two poor old 
beggar women sitting on a bench. 



I wonder," he heard 
one say, (t who it was 
who built this causeway, 
I should very much like 
to reward him, whoever 
he was." 

Axim stopped and 
wondered how a feeble old woman 
could possibly reward anyone, so, 
out of pure curiosity, he said : — 

" My father and I did the work 
between us. ?J 

" And what do you wish for as a 
reward ? " asked the old woman. 
"Nothing. I have all I want, ?! 
Axim replied. " I only wish to live and 
have the power to be of use to my country," 
11 A very sensible wish, indeed/' she 
answered. "And all I can tell you is, that 
you had better go and live as long as you can, 
and do all the good in your power while 
your life lasts." 
Axim laughed. 

"That is all very fine," he said, u but there 
are a great many things one would like to do 
in this world, but which, unfortunately, one 
can't." 

" Nonsense, there is no such thing as can't 
As a reward for what you have already done 
I will give you my blessing, which you will 
find of the greatest possible use. You will 
henceforth be able to do everything you 
desire." So saying, the old woman put her 
hand upon his head, muttering some mys- 
terious words, and then disappeared. 

Shortly after this war broke out between 
the Queen of the Hundred and First Kingdom 
and the King of the Sea ; for the King strongly 
objected to having his view interfered with by 
vessels and small craft belonging to the 
Queen, and had, on several occasions, pre- 

™^Msm%i$HOT g them and 



AXIM'S HE WARD; OR, THE MAGIC BLESSING. 



353 



taking all those on board prisoners. This 
naturally annoyed the Queen, and she 
promptly demanded the return of her sut> 
jects ; but the King refused to comply with 
her wishes, except on one condition, namely, 
that she should consent to become his wife ; 
but this offer she firmly declined^ and the 
result was war 

The kingdom was in a great state of 
excitement, and all the male population 
enlisted to fight the King of the Sea ; among 
others was our friend Axim, 

When the army had been on the march 
some weeks, and had almost arrived at the 
place appointed for the battle, which was by 
the seashore, the Queen found that she had 
forgotten her sword. 

"What shall I do ? " she exclaimed. " How 
am I to join in the fight without my favourite 
and most useful weapon ? " 

Her Generals advised her to relinquish the 
idea of personally conducting the campaign, 
but she was obstinate. 

11 1 will fight," she said, " and I must have 
my sword. Someone must go to the palace 
and fetch it at once. I insist upon having it 
by to-morrow morning/' 

But this the Generals declared impossible. 
" Why," they said, " it took us over six 
weeks to get here." 

u I can't help that, but the sword I 
must have, and whoever brings it to me 
by to-morrow morning shall have my 
daughter for his bride," 

This was j of course, a great induce- 
ment, as the young Princess was famous 
for her remarkable beauty, Axim imme- 
diately stepped forward. 



As soon as he was out of sight Axim 
stopped and laughed. 

" Now for the old woman's blessing ! J ' he 
thought. "I wonder whether it will prove 
useful or not ? I want to be at the palace 
within six hours." 

Hardly had he said these words when he 
found himself suddenly changed into a small 
bird, and by his side stood the very same old 
woman, "When you wish to resume your 
proper shape," she said, "just rub your beak, 
and you will find that you are a bird no 
longer, On the other hand, whenever you 
want to become a bird again, rub your nose. 
The only thing you must be careful about is 
to avoid falling into the hands of the King of 
the Sea, for then my blessing will lose its 
force. Now fly away." 

On flew Axim, until he alighted in the 
palace gardens. He hurriedly rubbed his 
beak, and, resuming his proper shape, walked 
into the palace and delivered the note to the 
Princess. 

" VVhat a marvellous man you must be ! " 
she exclaimed, on reading the letter. " How 



I 



fetch 



will 
the 



and 
sword, 
your Majesty," he 
said, " as I think 
I can do it in the 
time." 

The Queen at 
once wrote a note 
to the Princess 
telling her to give 
Axim the sword. 
This done, the 
young man de- 
parted, greatly to 
the amusement of 
the rest, who con- 
sidered him hope- 
lessly mad to 
undertake a thing 
which they knew to 
be an impossibility. 

Vol. XVJ.-46, 




""■ 



VERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



354 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 






did you manage to get here in such a short 
time? " 

" II was entirely due to the blessing of an 
old woman,' 1 he replied; and he told the 
Princess how he had been suddenly changed 
into a bird, and for fear of her not believing 
him, he rubbed his nose, and was instantly 
changed into the little bird. After flying 
round the room several times^ he perched 
himself on the Princess's arm. Just when he 
was about to resume his proper form, the 
Princess managed to cut off some of the 
feathers without his knowing it, and hid them 
carefully away. After that they sat clown to 
dinner and talked, until it dawned upon them 
that they had fallen very desperately in love 
with one another, 

Axim at last was obliged to 
tear himself away, so he bade 
the Princess a tender farewell, 
and, changing himself once more 
into a bird, flew 
off with the 
sword in his 
beak. 

Early on the 
fol lowing moru- 
ing, Axim 
arrived at the 
encampment, 
but as there was 
still plenty of 
time he resumed 
his proper form, 
and lying down 
by the seashore, 
fell fast asleep 
with the sword 
by his side, for 
he was weary 
after his long 
journey, and 
out of breath 
with flying so 
fast. Hardly 
had he fallen 
asleep when the 
Colonel came 
out of one of 
the tents to take 
his morning 

tub. The instant he caught sight of Axim 
and the Queen's sword, a thought struck him, 
and pushing the sleeping man into the sen, 
he possessed himself of the sword and quickly 
departed. 

On coming into the Queen's presence, he 
made a profound salutation, saying, 41 Behold, 
your Majesty, the sword which you desired, 



J'LSITED THE SUKEFING MAM INTO 

THE SEA." 



and which I have procured for you within 
the stated time, Axim and I had a race, 
but I lost sight of him on the way, I suppose 
some wild beast must have eaten him up in 
the forest." 

The Queen did not trouble her head about 
Axim ; all she wanted was the sword, 

M If you are still alive after the battle," 

she said, " you 
may marry my 
daughter." 

The Colonel, 
however, had no 
intention of get- 
ting killed ; he 
promptly got lost 
in the crowd 
the moment the 
battle com- 
menced, and was 
not seen until it 
was over. 

At first the 
Queen thought 
that the victory 
was not going to 
be on her side, 
for she lost many 
of her subjects, 
and was about to 
return to the 
palace miserably 
defeated, when 
to her intense 
joy things began 
to look more hopeful, and 
in a very short time she 
gained the victory. 

Now to return to Axim, 

He had not been idle, 

therefore he had not been 

drowned* The King of 

[he Sea saved him as he 

was falling and took him 

prisoner. When Axim 

heard that the Queen was 

not likely to come off victorious he 

became very miserable, particularly as 

he found himself unable to help her. 

" If only I could get on land again/' 

he thought, 4i I might do some good. 1 ' 

At last he begged the King to let him out 

just to have a look at his comrades. 

il It is hard," Axim said, * f to be kept a 
prisoner while there is fighting going on. You 
will surely not refuse to let me have one 
glimpse of the glorious spectacle/ 1 

The King of the Sea promised to take him 
up after sunset, a^d, what is more, he kept 

VERSITY OF MICHIGAN 




AXIA/S REWARD; OR, THE MAGIC BLESSING. 



355 



his word. As soon as Axim got on shore, he 
began to pray very hard to the saints that the 
sun would be so powerful next day as to 
scorch the King of the Sea ; for he and his 
men hated a hot sun, as they were not accus- 
tomed to it in the depths below, 

Axim had hardly finished praying when the 
King of the Sea carried him down again. 
Next day the sun was so powerful that the 
King's army could hardly bear the heat and 
many fainted, while the Queen and her troops 
fought bravely, killing many of her foes. 

At sunset Axim was again allowed up for 
a few minutes to pray, and next day the sun 
was so hot that very few of the 
enemy survived. On the third 
day the King himself got a sun- 
stroke, but although he managed 
to take Axim up on 
shore as usual at sun- 
set, he felt so giddy 
fc that heflvas unable to 
fetch him down again 
at the usual time, 
Axim was well aware 
of this ; he also knew 
that he would again 
have the power to 
successfully i n vok e 
the old woman's bless- 
ing if the King did 
not appear at the 
given time. There 
being no sign of the 
King, Axim hurriedly changed him- 
self into a bird, and by the time the 
King had recovered sufficiently to 
fetch his prisoner, that bird had flown ! 
Since then, the King of the Sea has 
never ventured out of his depths for 
fear of sun-stroke. 

Meanwhile the Queen, having 
gained the victory, returned to the 
palace and gave orders for the wedding of 
her daughter and the wicked Colonel. 

Just as the feast was at it highest, Axim 
walked into the palace and straight up to the 
Queen, 

" What is the meaning of this ? " he asked, 
in some surprise. "You promised that I 
should marry your daughter if I brought you 
back the sword—why, then, is she about to 
marry another ? " 

u You never brought me the sword," the 
Queen replied, indignantly; "you got eaten 
up by wild beasts instead, and left the 
Colonel to do my bidding. Away with you \ n 

if There is some mistake, 1 ' said the Princess, 
getting up from the table and approaching 



her mother. "This certainly is the man who 
fetched vour sword, and not the Colonel. I 
told you it was not the Colonel from the first." 

4< What proof have you that it is this man ? " 
asked the Queen. 

M Will you please change yourself into a 
bird," the Princess said, turning to Axim, 
"and I will show my mother what I mean ?" 

Axim immediately did as he was told, 
while the Princess took out of her pocket the 
feathers she had cut off, and showed every- 
body present from whence she had cut them. 




"axim immediately did as he was told." 

(l But that is not all/* said a %'oice, and on 
looking round Axim beheld his friend the old 
woman ; " if it had not been for him your 
Majesty would never have won the battle," 
and the old woman then explained everything. 

"But," objected the Queen, "how do you 
know? How are we to believe you? Who 
are you ? n 

"This is who I am "—as she spoke she 
was suddenly changed into a beautiful fairy, 
and was recognised by all present as the 
good Queen of the Air Spirits, 

After that no more proofs were necessary. 
The wicked Colonel was promptly beheaded, 
while Axim and the charming Princess were 
married and livtxJ happily ever after. 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



366 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



very clever artist. I wish that the Duchess 
had been able to go on ; but you know how 
much work our Royalties have to do. How- 
ever, the Princess means to keep to it, and I 
am very glad, for she has real talent," 

Princess Alice goes to Mrs. Ward's studio 
regularly once a week during the terms, 
and is one of the most industrious of the 
pupils. By the great kindness of the 
Duchess, I was permitted to have a photo- 
graph taken of the Princess while at her 
work, and the drawing upon which she 
was engaged at the 
time was also photo- 
graphed. 

After we had looked 
round the studio, 
which contains 
art treasures of 
which a volume 
might well be 
written, Mrs. 
Ward suggested 
an adjournment 
to the drawing- 
room and tea, 
"You must want 
some refresh- 
ment after hear- 
ing about all 
my relations," 
she said, laugh- 
ingly, as she led 
the way, 

The drawing- 
room, though, 
of course, free 
from artistic dis- 
order, is just as 
full as, if not 
fuller than r the 
studio of preci- 
ous art treasures. 
The walls are actually 
covered with pictures, 
and many beautiful 
drawings by the late 
Mr E. M. Ward are 
among them, one of 
the most interesting 
being a portrait of the Prince of Wales at 
the age of fourteen, which was a study for 
a picture which Mr. Ward did for the 
Queen and the Prince Consort, for whom 
he executed much work. This drawing 
is here reproduced for the first time. 

"Do you see those drawings of the French 
Emperor and of the Empress Eugenie?" 
asked Mrs, \Wcl t " Well, they always 




K. B. II. THK PRI\'CE OK WALES AT THL AGE OK 14 

From the ftrawitiff hjf E- H- Watfif, R. A, Aum- tofnttdatvd far thm 
JitMt time. 



bring such an amusing story to my 
mind. You must know that my hus- 
band had a command to paint a picture 
of the Emperor being invested with the 
Order of the Garter by the Queen herself. 
My husband, naturally, consulted me con- 
stantly, and this picture gave him a good 
deal of trouble. Somehow or other, the pose 
of the two principal figures — the Emperor 
and the Queen- -puzzled him greatly, and one 
afternoon, when he was quite in despair 
about them, my husband decided that he had 

better paint in the un- 
draped figures in order 
to get the pose cor- 
rect. So in he painted 
the undraped figures, 
and rather ludi- 
crous of course 
they looked. 
Just as he had 
finished them, 
however, and 
we were criticis- 
ing the work, to 
our horror and 
confusion the 
door was swung 
open, and a ser- 
vant announced 
1 that the Queen 
was coming to 
see how the 
picture was get- 
ting on. My 
husband was 
simply thunder 
struck ! How- 
ever, there was 
nothing to be 
done but to ob- 
literate the fig- 
ures, which he 
did, I don't know how, 
for we were so terribly 
afraid that the Queen 
would -appear before 
he had had time to 
hide them- As it hap- 
pened, though, the 
Queen .sent in word that she would come in 
later ; which she did. But you ran imagine 
our confusion ! n 

M I suppose you had many opportunities 
of seeing the Queen?" 

" Oh, yes, indeed. And though I know 
it is a common remark, I never can help 
saying how .little people can understand 
how dignifi^'aARa'^HiBious the Queen 

university of Michigan 



ILL USTRA TED INTER VIE WS. 



367 




h'tmtt thf Pruning &fj 



\K .1/ U----'- 
It I 



NAPDLBOK lit. 
aV^Mt rtipl mi aod for th* flv%t linn 

is until they have met her* I saw 
most of her when I was painting the 
portrait of Princess Beatrice The 
Queen had seen some portraits that 
I had done of my own children — 
those very portraits on the wall over 
there — and it was because of tht^m 
that she was good enough to give me 
a command for a portrait of Princess 
Beatrice, who was then ten months 
old, and such a remarkably pretty 
little baby, and so good-tempered. 
The Queen used to come in con- 
stantly to see how the picture was 
getting on, and took the greatest 
possible interest in it, She is, as you 
probably know, a very clever artist 
herself, but she confined herself 
almost entirely to water-colour. * I've 
tried to paint in oil, Mrs, Ward/ she 
said to me one day; 4 but there is 
always something to disturb me. So 
1 have given it up/ " 

"Was Princess Beatrice a good 
sitter?" 

" Most exemplary," said Mrs, Ward, 



with a laugh. "Though I have no 
doubt that a rattle — which, by the 
way j was given to me, for my little 
baby, after the picture was finished- 
had most to do with her quietude. 
But, as I told you, she was a most 
good-fempered baby. I really think 
I can only remember one time when 
she became at all unmanageable, and 
that was when the Queen came in 
and tickled her little toes. The little 
Princess didn't approve of the opera- 
tion at all, and began to kick. ( Oh, 
but I will do what I like with my 
own baby/ I remember the Queen 
saying, with that wonderful smile of 
hers, as she went on with the process." 
^ It often seems strange to me to 
think," went on Mrs* Ward, "when I 
am teaching Princess Alice, how the 
late Duke of Albany used to come in 
and pay me visits when quite a little, 
tiny boy. Such a nice little boy he 
was ! His great amusement was to 
put my bonnet on and strut about the 
room with great delight, One day 




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he came in with the Princess Royal, and, 

walking up to my picture, in the background 

of which I had painted a few birds, asked, 

very solemnly, ' Is dern co's ? ' I remember 

that the Princess pretended to be horrified at 

his grammar," 

" And you saw the Prince Consort ? " 
"Oh, yes. He used to pay my husband 

visits with the Queen. He also took the 

greatest interest in painting, and was always 

full of suggestions, He was so kind and 

nice. His manner 

with children, too, 

was particularly 

charming, and he 

was so devoted to 

them. There was 

nothing he loved 

better, I was told, 

than a romp in 

the nursery, and 

that he would 

often take little 

Princess Beatrice 

on his knee and 

sing softly to her 

while she slept. 

The luncheon- 



hour was generally the hour of the most 
perfect freedom, and he would keep the 
children in roars of laughter the whole time. 
By the way, talking of the Prince Consort, 
I shall never forget what happened the first 
time that he came to our house with the 
Queen. After we had talked for a few 
minutes, they said they would like to see our 
children, who were accordingly sent for 
One of my little daughters came down in 
great excitement, and the Prince Consort 




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railfCBSS BEATRICE AT THfc AGE OF lo MONTHS. 

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patted her kindly on the cheek and made 
some pleasant remark. ' Don't,' said my 
democratic little daughter, * I want to see 
Prince Albert's 
horses-' The 
Prince was 
greatly amused." 

H Did you ever 
meet the Prince 
of Wales as a 
boy?" 

"No, never. 
You see t he was 
generally away at 
that time. But 
the Duke of Con- 
naught used often 
to tome in and 
see me, always 
apojogizing for 
disturbing me, 
with a most 
elaborate bow. ,T 

Many of Mrs. 
Ward's happiest 
days were spent 
in the neighbour- 
hood of Windsor. 
She cannot say 
too much in 
praise of the 
Queen, whose 
care and fore- 
thought, even for 
the most minor 

Vol kvL^-47, 




-*- 



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details, were quite 
extraordinary. Not 
only did she en- 
courage Mrs, Ward 
to use her best 
efforts, by paying 
her constant visits 
and making the 
most kindly and 
gracious comments 
on her work s but 
every little thing 
that could be done 
to make the artist 
comfortable was 
attended to by 
the Queen's own 
orders. Princess 
Beatrice's were the 
only two portraits 
painted by Mrs. 
Ward for the 
Queen, but the 
engraving of the 
picture, " God Save the Queen," which I 
have already mentioned, also hangs in one 
of the Royal residences. 

M I think that I 
can only remem- 
ber one really un- 
pleasant incident 
connected with 
the time I spent 
at Windsor," said 
Mrs, Ward, as we 
went on chatting 
about the Queen 
and her surround- 
ings at that time. 
u I wanted to get 
a piper to sit to 
me for a picture 
I was painting, 
and one of the 
Royal pipers was 
procured for me, 
I had my sus- 
picions as to the 
man's sobriety 
when he first 
came in to my 
studio, but you 
can imagine my 
horror and fright 
when he all at 
once began to 
dance in the 
maddest way 
imaginable, I 



THE PRINCF.5K KOVAL ON THE TUN HACK AT WINDSOR. 

From a Sketch by Mtw. K M- Ward, j\W reproduced for tht /rrt Jim*. 

Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



37° 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 




MOHNKl- Of THE Di: CHEttS OF AM1ANY K HAtffJ -liV MR. IVtLl.lAM&lN, KSlItU*. 



never shall forgot that dance. He rushed 
about all over the studio, thrusting and 
stabbing with his dirk, and making the most 
hideous noises; sometimes coming close up 
to me, then darting to the other end of the 
room, then rushing hack, and so on. I never 
felt so frightened before, and the wretch never 
stopped until he was utterly ex- 
hausted. But you can imagine that 
the scene must have been very 
ludicrous, though I did not laugh 
at the time, I can assure you. The 
man died, I heard, very shortly 
afterwards. He was simply mad 
with drink. But, now, come and 
look at some more of my treasures. 
I'm very proud of some of them, I 
can assure you." 

One would want to spend a week 
in Mrs. Ward's charming home in 
Gerald Road, to be able to thoroughly 
appreciate her splendid collection. 
One of the most priced and the 
most interesting of the things in the 
drawing-room is the model of the 
Duchess of Albany's peculiarly beau- 
tiful hand, which the Duchess had 
specially cast for Mrs. Ward by Mr. 
Williamson, J - the Royal Sculptor, 71 
of Eshen Then in the centre of 
the drawing room there is a cabinet 
that belonged to the great I-ady 
Blessington, and which contains the 
most fascinating of secret drawers 
that must have puzzled even the 
maker to discover, I should think. 
A place of honour is given to the 
excellent photograph of the Duchess 
of Albany and her two children taken 
at the time when the Duchess was a 
pupil of Mrs. Ward, and which I am 
kindly permitted to reproduce with 

Digitized by VjO( 



this article. Then facing 
this photograph is a splendid 
drawing of the late Mr. E. 
M. Ward, R.A., by Mr. 
George Richmond, R.A., 
and surrounding this are 
some exquisite drawings by 
many of Mrs. Ward's count- 
less relations ; but I will 
not he led into an attempt 
to enumerate any of them ! 
The portraits of her child- 
ren, to which I have 
already alluded, are also in 
the drawing-room ; and I 
feel sure that Mr. " Spy " 
Leslie Ward must wonder 

whether he ever were the demure little fellow 

who, toy whip in hand, looks the picture of 

childish s^ood behaviour. 

Hut an account of Mrs. Ward's collection 

would fill a whole number of The Strand 

Magazine. 

" I have so many things," she told me, as 




k" 



THE DL'CHRSS OF ALBANY AND HER CHILPRF-K. 



VERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



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Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



Vol. xvi. 



The Strand Magazine. 



OCTOBER, 1898. 



No. 94. 



Illustrated Interviews. 

LX.— MRS. E. M. WARD. 

"ROYALTIES AS ARTISTS." 

By Ralph W. Maude. 




URELY there could not be a 
more business - like looking 
studio than Mrs. Ward's ! 
There are easels everywhere — 
big easels, little easels, easels 
with nothing on them, easels 

with drawings of the simplest kind, easels 

with elaborate pictures. Then in every 

corner of the room, on every table, on 

every chair, on every cabinet, even on the 

floor itself, are there things that pertain to 

the teaching of 

art. I almost 

tripped over a 

most abandoned- 
looking lay figure, 

with an Indian 

shawl over her 

stuffed shoul- 
ders; there was a 

horse's leg resting 

against a bust ; 

there were paints 

and pencils and 

drawing-pins all 

over the place; 

and finally there 

was the result of 

all this delightful 

confusioft in the 

shape of the work 

of Mrs. Ward's 

many pupils. 
" I am so sorry 

to have kept you 

waiting," Mrs. 

Ward said, " but 

my pupils have 

only just gone, 

and no member 

of your sex, 

Vol xvi.— 40, 



MRS. E. 

From a Drawing by herself, mod* 



except the Academicians, who kindly visit 
from time to time, is ever allowed in here 
while they are at work ! But now I'm quite 
free. Isn't this place in a terrible mess ? 
I am always trying to keep it tidy; but its 
quite impossible." 

Mrs. Ward propped up the lay figure as 

she spoke, and when we had removed a 

mystic-looking plaster hand from one chair 

and a flower-pot from the other, we sat down. 

" Yours was practically the first art school 

of its kind, was 
it not, Mrs. 
Ward?" I asked. 
" Yes, abso- 
lutely. You see, 
when my hus- 
band died, I 
wanted to do 
something beside 
my painting, and 
the idea which 
has resulted in 
this struck me. 
You have no 
idea how I was 
discouraged, 
though. Every- 
body said that it 
could not pos- 
sibly succeed. 
Sir Frederick 
Leighton, among 
others, did his 
best to dissuade 
me. But I am 
a determined 
person, and I 
had my way. 
Nineteen years 

M WARD 

^*J^H^fiM^ICHIG« I started m y 




Original from 



374 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 







1 I AM HE^K, SIR— MRS, WOOP&. 



typhoid fever Dr. I .an a had asked her to 
look in the last thing and let him know how 
her husband was progressing. She observed 
that the light was burning in the study, but 
having knocked several times at the surgery 
door without response, she concluded that 
the doctor had been called out, and so re- 
turned home. 

There is a short, winding drive with a lamp 
at the end of it leading down from the house 
to the road. As Mrs. Madding emerged 
from the gate a man was coming along the foot- 
path. Thinking that it might be Dr. Lana 
returning from some professional visit, she 
wailed for him, and was surprised to see that 
it was Mr. Arthur Morton, the young squire. 
In the light of the lamp she observed that his 
manner was excited, and that he carried in 
his hand a heavy hunting-crop. He was 
turning in at the gate when she addressed 
him. 

l< The doctor is not in, sir," said she. 

"How do you know that?" he asked, 
harshly. 

" I have been to the surgery door, sir/' 

"I see a light," said the young squire, 
looking up the drive. u That is in his study, 
is it not?" 

" Yes, sir ; but I am sure that he is out" 

"Well, he must come in again," said 
young Morton, and passed through tlu i L r ;iU: 
while Mrs, Madding went upon her home- 
ward way, rtrtJ ,| .„ 

7 Digitized by L^OOgle 



A t three 
o'clock that 
morning her 
husband suf- 
fered a sharp 
relapse, and she 
was so alarmed 
by his symp- 
toms that she 
determined to 
call the doctor 
without delay. 
As she passed 
through the gate 
she w + as sur- 
prised to see 
someone lurk- 
ing among the 
laurd bushes. It 
was certainly a 
man, and to the 
best of her be- 
lief Mr, Arthur 
Morton. Preoc- 
cupied with her 
own troubles, 
she gave no particular attention to the 
incident, but hurried on upon her errand* 

When she reached the house she perceived 
to her surprise that the light was still burning 
in the study. She therefore tapped at the 
surgery door There was no answer. She 
repeated the knocking several times without 
effect It appeared to her to be unlikely 
that the doctor would either go to bed or go 
out leaving so brilliant a light behind him, 
and it struck Mrs. Madding that it was pos- 
sible that he might have dropped asleep in 
his chair. She tapped at the study window, 
therefore, but without result. Then, finding 
that there was an opening between the curtain 
and the woodwork, she looked through. 

The small room was brilliantly lighted from 
a large lamp on the central table, which was 
littered with the doctor's books and instru- 
ments* No one was visible, nor did she see 
anything unusual, except that in the further 
shadow thrown by the tabic a dingy white 
glove was lying upon the carpet. And then 
suddenly, as her eyes became more accus- 
tomed to the light, a boot emerged from the 
other end of the shadow, and she realized, 
with a thrill of horror, that what she had 
taken to be a glove was the hand of a man, 
who was prostrate upon the floor. Under- 
standing that something terrible had occurred, 
she rang at the front door, roused Mrs, 
Woods, the housekeeper, and the two women 
made their (Siaigirnlbftbenstudy, having first 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



ILL USTRATED E\TER VIE IVS. 



3^5 



serious school. No, no; my artistic feelings 
are the same as those of my ancestors* And 
I T m a believer in heredity ! J! 

And then Mrs. Ward began to tell me of 
her wonderful artistic pedigree ; and would I 
could remember it all, but honestly I cannot. 
Still 3 when I say that Mrs. Ward, besides being 
herself a distinguished painter, is the great- 
granddaughter of artists, the granddaughter 
of artists, the daughter of artists, the niece of 
artists, the cousin of artists, the widow of 
an artist, the mother of artists, and the 
grandmother of at least one promising 
artist, it will give some .idea of her artistic 
connection, I really got quite bewildered 
over her account of her various relations, 
of which at least five were mem hers of 



material. The wonderful skill of that famous 
animal painter, James Ward, has evidently 
been transmitted to one of Mrs, Ward's 
daughters ; another of her daughters is a 
most charming pastel painter; and Mrs. 
Ward's son, Leslie, is the well-known "Spy," 
of Vanity Fair. And so on— but the 
history of the Ward family must be left in 
more capable hands than mine- 

" Now," Mrs. Ward said, after she had 
had a hearty laugh over my bewilderment, 
" you must see some of my pupils 1 work. 
That drawing just behind you there is by 
Princess Alice of Albany, one of my most 
promising pupils. She is so earnest and pains- 
taking— so thorough- -and takes such interest 
in it all. It is a real delight to me to teach her. 



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(WAIVING UY PKtNCKSS AI.ICK < M- AI.LiANV. 

Reproduced for the find time (*v Ipedtff jjermimm 



the Royal Academy, for, curiously enough, 
though not related in any way, Mrs, Ward 
and her husband were both Wards before 
their marriage, so that my bewilderment 
may be comprehensible. 

For students of the doctrine of heredity 



You know, the Duchess of Albany was one of 
my pupils at one time, and for many years 
she has honoured me with her kind help and 
regard. She drew very well indeed, but her 
public work is so hard now, that she has but 
little time for art. Her sister, the Queen- 



Ma Ward's family offer most interesting Re^fl^^^p^w^^^tand, is al*>p a 



3 66 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



very clever artist I wish that the Duchess 
had been able to go on; hut you know how 
much work our Royalties have to do. How- 
ever, the Princess means to keep to it, and 1 
am very glad, for she has real talent/ 3 

Princess Alice goes to Mrs* Ward's studio 
regularly once a week during the terms, 
and is one of the most industrious or the 
pupils. By the great kindness of the 
Duchess^ I was permitted to have a photo- 
graph taken of the Princess while at her 
work, and the drawing upon which she 
was engaged at the 
time was also photo- 
graphed 

After we had looked 
round the studio, 
which contains 
art treasures of 
which a volume 
might well he 
written, Mrs, 
Ward suggested 
an adjournment 
tu the drawing- 
room and tea. 
"You must want 
some refresh- 
ment after hear- 
ing about all 
my relations," 
she said, laugh- 
ingly, as she led 
the way* 

The drawing- 
room, though, 
of course, free 
from artistic dis- 
order, is just as 
full as, if not 
fuller than, the 
studio of preci- 
ous .art treasures. 
The walls are actually 
covered with pictures, 
and many beautiful 
drawings by the late 
Mr. E. M, Ward are 
among them, one of 
the most interesting 
being a portrait of the Prince 
the age of fourteen, which was 
a picture which Mr. Ward did for the 
Queen and the Prince Consort, for whom 
he executed mueh work. This drawing 
is here reproduced for the first time. 

" Do you see those drawings of the French 
Emperor and of the Empress Eugenie?" 
asked Mrs, W^rci* " Well, they always 




H.R<H« THE PRINCE "F WALES AT TIIK AGE OF T+ 

fVowi the drawing by B. Jf, Ward* RA, Nov i-wndawd for the 



M. Ward, H A, 
Jlrtt tiwe- 



of A Vales at 
a study for 



bring such an amusing story to my 
mind + You must know that my hus- 
band had a command to paint a picture 
of the Emperor being invested with the 
Order of the Garter by the Queen herself. 
My husband, naturally, consulted me con- 
stantly, and this picture gave him a good 
deal of trouble. Somehow or other, the pose 
of the two principal figures — the Emperor 
and the Queen- -puzzled him greatly, and one 
afternoon, when he was quite in despair 
about them, my husband decided that he had 

better paint in the un- 
draped figures in order 
to get the pose cor- 
rect- So in he painted 
the und raped figures, 
and rather ludi- 
crous of course 
they looked. 
Just as he had 
finished them, 
however, and 
we were criticis- 
ing the work, to 
our horror and 
confusion the 
door was swung 
open, and a ser- 
vant announced 
that the Queen 
was coming to 
see how the 
picture was get- 
ting on. My 
husband was 
simply thunder 
struck ! How- 
ever, there was 
nothing to be 
done but to ob- 
literate the fig- 
ures, which he 
did, I don't know how, 
for we writ.: so terribly 
afraid that the Queen 
would -appear before 
he had had time to 
hide them. As it hap- 
pened, though, the 
Queen sent in word that she would come in 
later ; which she did. But you can imagine 
our confusion I " 

" I suppose you had many opportunities 
of seeing the Queen ? " 

u Oh, yes, indeed, And 
it is a common remark, I 
saving how little peoulc can understand 

h °* MmiW!Wfe.N the Queen 



though I know 
never can help 
can 



JL L USTRA TED INTER VIE TVS. 



367 




Fi om tks. DramiNff h>t] 



NAKJLEOK 111. 
*V0» iv;ji7«i «.■*.( fat Uo p& hnir 



is until they have met her. I saw 
most of her when I was painting the 
portrait of Princess Beatrice. The 
Queen had seen some portraits that 
I had done of my own children — 
those very portraits on the wall over 
there— and it was because of them 
that she was good enough to give me 
a command for a portrait of Princess 
Beatrice, who was then ten months 
oldj and such a remarkably pretty 
little baby, and so good-tempered* 
The Queen used to come in con- 
stantly to see how the picture was 
getting on, and took the greatest 
possible interest in it. She is, as you 
probably know, a very clever artist 
herself, but she confined herself 
almost entirely to water-colour. 'I've 
tried to paint in oil, Mrs. Ward/ she 
said to me one day ; ' but there is 
always something to disturb me. So 
I have given it up/" 

" Was Princess Beatrice a good 
sitter?" 

" Most exemplary/' said Mrs. Ward, 



with a laugh. "Though I have no 
doubt that a rattle— which, by the 
way, was given to me, for my litde 
baby, after the picture was finished — 
had most to do with her quietude. 
But, as I told you, she was a most 
good-tempered baby. I really think 
1 can only remember one time when 
she became at all unmanageable, and 
that was when the Queen came in 
and tickled her little toes. The little 
Princess didn't approve of the opera- 
tion at all, and began to kick. * Oh, 
but I will do what I like with my 
own baby,' I remember the Queen 
saying, with that wonderful smile of 
hers, as she went on with the process," 
s * It often seems strange to me to 
think," went on Mrs- Ward, "when I 
am teaching Princess Alice, how the 
late Duke of Albany used to come in 
and pay me visits when quite a little, 
tiny boy. Such a nice little boy he 
was ! His great amusement was to 
put my bonnet on and strut about the 
room with great delight. One day 




JVohi thf /ft-di'-MijrFijl 



ht. Ward Y ti,A. 



UNWR!ThrtJfflllfrlfi?tN 



3^8 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 




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FACSIMILE Of A LETTER FROM THE QUEEN. 



he came in with the Princess Royal, and, 
walking up to my picture, in the background 
of which I had painted a few birds, asked, 
very solemnly, * Is dem co's ? J I remember 
that the Princess pretended to be horrified at 
his grammar." 

"And you saw the Prince Consort ? * 
" Oh j yes. He used to pay my husband 
visits with the Queen. He also took the 
greatest interest in painting, and was always 



full of suggestions, 
nice. His manner 
with children, too, 
was particularly 
charming, and he 
was so devoted to 
them. There was 
nothing he loved 
better, I was told, 
than a romp in 
the nursery, and 
that he would 
often take little 
Princess Beatrice 
on his knee and 
sing softly to her 
while she slept 
The Luncheon- 



He was so kind and 



hour was generally the hour of the most 
perfect freedom, and he would keep the 
children in roars of laughter the whole time. 
By the way, talking of the Prince Consort, 
I shall never forget what happened the first 
time that he came to our house with the 
Queen. After we had talked for a few 
minutes, they said they would like to see our 
children, who were accordingly sent for. 
One of my little daughters came down in 
great excitement, and the Prince Consort 




xi 



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Original from 



1h:inc:|lSS UEATI 



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ROUND THE FIRE. 



379 



save her brother from the gallows by the 
sacrifice of her former lover, The court 
next morning was crammed to overflowing, 
and a murmur of excitement passed over it 
when Mr, Humphrey was observed to enter 
in a state of emotion, which even his trained 
nerves could not conceal, and to confer with 
the opposing counsel. A few hurried words 
— words which left a look of amazement 
upon Mr, Porlock Carres face — passed 
between them, and then the counsel for the 
defence, addressing the judge, announced 
that, with the consent of the prosecution, the 
young lady who had given evidence upon 
the sitting before would not be recalled 

The Judge: But you appear, Mr, Hum- 
phrey, to have left matters in a very unsatis- 
factory state. 

Mr. Humphrey : Perhaps, my lord, my 
next witness may help to clear them up* 

The Judge : Then call your next witness. 

Mr. Humphrey; I call Dr, Aluysius I^ina. 

The learned counsel has made many telling 
remarks in his day, but he has certainly never 
produced such a sensation with so short a 
sentence. The Court was simply 
stunned with amazement as the 
very man whose fate had been 
the subject of so much con- 
tention appeared bodily before 
them in the witness-box, Those 
among the s pec ta tors who had 
known him at Bishop's 
Crossing saw him now, 
gaunt and thin, with 
deep lines of care upon 
his face But in spite of 
his melancholy bearing 
and despondent expres- 
sion, there were few 
who could say that they 
had ever seen a man 
of more distinguished 
presence. Bowing to 
the judge, he asked if 
he might be allowed to 
make a statement, and 
having been duly in- 
formed that whatever 
he said might be used 
against him, he bowed 
once more, and pro- 
ceeded : — 

tE My wish," said he, (< is to hold nc hing 
back, but to tell with perfect frankness all 
that occurred upon the night of the 21st of 
June. Had I known that the innocent had 
suffered, and that so much trouble had been 



brought upon those w + hom I love best in the 
world, I should have come forward long ago ; 
but there were reasons which prevented these 
things from coming to my ears. It was my 
desire that an unhappy man should vanish 
from the world which had known him, but I 
had not foreseen that others would be affected 
by my actions. Let me to the best of my 
ability repair the evil which I have done. 

"To anyone who is acquainted with the 
history of the Argentine Republic the name 
of Lana is well known. My father, who came 
of the best blood of old Spain, filled all the 
highest offices of the State, and would have 
been President but for his death in the riots 
at San Juan. A brilliant career might have 
been open to my twin brother Ernest and 
myself had it not been for financial losses 
which made it necessary that we should earn 

1 




HE HOWEFi TO THE jUP^E, 



our own living. I apologize, sir, if these 
details appear to be irrelevant, but they are 
a necessary introduction to that which is to 
follow. . 

" I ha&W'iTiave said a twin brother 
WERSITY Of MICHIGAN 



38° 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



named Ernest, whose resemblance to trie was 
so great that even when we were together 
people could see no difference between 11*. 
Down to the smallest detail we were exactly 
the same, As we grew older this likeness 
became less marked because our expression 
was not the same, but with our features 
in repose the points of difference were very 
slight. 

"It does not become me to say too much 
of one who is dead, the more so as he is my 
only brother, but 
I leave his char- 
acter to those 
who knew him 
best I will only 
say— for I have 
to say it— that 
in my early man- 
hood I conceived 
a horror of him, 
and that I had 
good reason for 
the aversion 
which filled me. 
My own reputa- 
tion suffered 
from his actions, 
for our close 
rese m b la nee 
caused me to be 
credited with many 
them. Eventually, in i 
peculiarly disgraceful busi- 
ness, he contrived to 
throw the whole odium upon me 
in such a way that I was forced 
to leave the Argentine for ever, 
and to seek a career in Europe. The 
freedom from his hated presence more 
than compensated me For the loss of my 
native land. I had enough money to 
defray my medical studies at Glasgow, and I 
finally settled in practice at Bishop's Crossing, 
in the firm conviction that in that remote 
Lancashire hamlet I should never hear of 
him again. 

" For years my hopes were fulfilled, and 
then at last he discovered me. Some Liver- 
pool man who visited Buenos Ayres put him 
upon my track. He had lost all his money, 
and he thought that he would come over and 
share mine. Knowing my horror of him, he 
rightly thought that I would be willing to buy 
him off. I received a letter from him saying that 
he was coming. It was at a crisis in my own 
affairs, and his arrival might conceivably bring 
trouble, and even disgrace, upon some whom 
I was especially bound to shield from anything 

Digitized by ^_t1 



of the kind I took steps to insure that any 
evil which might come should fall on me only, 
and that" — here he turned and looked at 
the prisoner — "was the cause of conduct 
upon my part which has been too harshly 
judged. My only motive was to screen those 
who were dear to me from any possible 
connection with scandal or disgrace, That 
scandal and disgrace would come with my 
brother was only to say that what had been 
would be again. 




I HEARD A FOOTSTEP UKW THE GRAVEL OITSIOH." 

u My brother arrived himself one night not 
very long after my receipt of the letter. I 
was sitting in my study after the servants 
had gone to bed, when I heard a footstep 
upon the gravel outside, and an instant later 
I saw his face looking in at me through the 
window. He was a clean-shaven man like 
myself, and the resemblance between us was 
still so great that, for an instant, I thought it 
was my own reflection in the glass. He had 
a dark patch over his eye, but our features 
were absolutely the same. Then he smiled 
in a sardonic way which had been a trick of 
his from his boyhood, and I knew that he 
was ihe same brother who had driven me 
from my native land, and brought disgrace 
upon what had he^n an honourable name. 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



ROUND THE FIRE. 



38i 



I went to the door and I admitted him. That 
would be about ten o'clock that night. 

" When he came into the glare of the 
lamp, I saw at once that he had fallen upon 
very evil days. He had walked from Liver- 
pool, and hje was tired and ill. I was quite 
shocked by the expression upon his face. 
My medical knowledge told me that there 
was some serious internal malady. He 
had been drinking also, and his face was 
bruised as the result of a scuffle which he had 
had with some sailors. It was to cover his 
injured eye that he wore this patch, which he 
removed when he entered the room. He 
was himself dressed in a pea-jacket and 
flannel shirt, and his feet were bursting 
through his boots. But his poverty had only 
made him more savagely vindictive towards 
me. His hatred rose to the height of a 
mania. I had been rolling in money in 
England, according to his account, while he 
had been starving in South America. I 
cannot describe to you the threats which he 
uttered or the insults which he poured upon 
me. My impression is, that hardships and 
debauchery had unhinged his reason. He 
paced about the room like a wild beast, 
demanding drink, demanding money, and 
all in the foulest language. I am a hot- 
tempered man, but I thank God that I 
am able to say that I remained master 
of myself, and that I never raised a hand 
against him. My coolness only irritated him 
the more. He raved, he cursed, he shook 
his fists in my face, and then suddenly a 
horrible spasm passed over his features, he 
clapped his hand to his side, and with a loud 
cry he fell in a heap at my feet. I raised 
him up and stretched him upon the sofa, but 
no answer came to my exclamations, and the 
hand which I held in mine was cold and 
clammy. His diseased heart had broken 
down. His own violence had killed him. 

" For a long time I sat as if I were in 
some dreadful dream, staring at the body of 
my brother. I was aroused by the knocking 
of Mrs. Woods, who had been disturbed by 
that dying cry. I sent her away to bed. 
Shortly afterwards a patient tapped at the 
surgery door, but as I took no notice, he or 
she went off again. Slowly and gradually as 
I sat there a plan was forming itself in my 
head in the curious automatic way in which 
plans do form. When I rose from my chair 
my future movements were finally decided 
upon without my having been conscious of 
any process of thought. It was an instinct 
which irresistibly inclined me towards one 
course. 



" Ever since that change in my affairs to 
which I have alluded, Bishop's Crossing had 
become hateful to me. My plans of life 
had been ruined, and I had met with hasty 
judgments and unkind treatment where I 
had expected sympathy. It is true that any 
danger of scandal from my brother had 
passed away with his life ; but still, I was sore 
about the past, and felt that things could 
never be as they had been. It may be that 
I was unduly sensitive, and that I had not 
made sufficient allowance for others, but my 
feelings were as I describe. Any chance of 
getting away from Bishop's Crossing and of 
everyone in it would be most welcome to 
me. And here was such a chance as I could 
never have dared to hope for, a chance which 
would enable me to make a clean break with 
the past. 

" There was this dead man lying upon the 
sofa, so like me that save for some little 
thickness and coarseness of the features there 
was no difference $t all. No one had seen 
him come and no one would miss him. We 
were both clean shaven, and his hair was 
about the same length as my own. If I 
changed clothes with him, then Dr. Aloysius 
Lana would be found lying dead in his study, 
and there would be an end of an unfortunate 
fellow, and of a blighted career. There was 
plenty of ready money in the room, and this 
I could carry away with me to help me to 
start once more in some other land. In my 
brother's clothes I could walk by night 
unobserved as far as Liverpool, and in that 
great seaport I would soon find some means 
of leaving the country. After my lost hopes, 
the humblest existence where I was unknown 
was far preferable in my estimation to a 
practice, however successful, in Bishop's 
Crossing, where at any moment I might come 
face to face with those whom I should wish, 
if it were possible, to forget. I determined 
to effect the change. 

" And I did so. I will not go into par- 
ticulars, for the recollection is as painful as 
the experience; but in an hour my. brother 
lay, dressed down to the smallest detail in 
my clothes, while I slunk out by the surgery 
door, and taking the back path which led 
across some fields, I started off to make the 
best of my way to Liverpool, where I arrived 
the same night. My bag of money and a 
certain portrait were all 1 carried out of the 
house, and I left behind me in my hurry the 
shade which my brother had been wearing 
over his eye. Everything else of his I took 
with mi-. 

"lgivtpfifflrwk^rfiword, sir, that never for 

IVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



Round the Fire. 
By A, Con an Doyle. 

V.— THE STORY OF THE BLACK DOCTOR. 




ISHOFS CROSSING is a 
small village lying ten miles 
in a south-westerly direction 
from Liverpool, Here in the 
early seventies there settled a 
doctor named Aloysius I-nna, 
Nothing was known locally either of his ante- 
cedents or of the reasons which had prompted 
him to come to this I^ncashire ham let. Two 
facts only were certain about him : the one that 
he had gained his medical qualification with 
some distinction at Glas- 
gow j the other that 
he came undoubtedly of 
a tropical race, and was 
so dark that he might 
almost have had a strain 
of the Indian in his com- 
position. His predomi- 
nant features were, how- 
ever, European, and he 
possessed a stately cour- 
tesy and carriage which 
suggested a Spanish ex- 
traction, A swarthy skin, 
raven - black hair, and 
dark, sparkling eyes 
under a pair of heavily- 
tufted brows made a 
strange contrast to the 
flaxen or chestnut rustics 
of England, and the new- 
comer was soon known as 
"The Black Doctor of 
Bishop's Crossing," At 
first it was a term of ridi- 
cule and reproach ; as 
the years went on it 
became a title of honour 
which was familiar to the 
whole country-side, and 
extended far beyond the 
narrow confines of the 
village. 

For the new-comer proved himself to be a 
capable surgeon and an accomplished physi- 
cian. The practice of that district had been 
in the hands o! Edward Rowe, the son of Sir 
William Rowe, the Liverpool consultant, but 
he had not inherited the talents of his father, 
and Dr, I^na, with his advantages of presence 
and of manner, soon beat him out of the 
field. Dr. liana's social success was as rapid 




[UK lil.ACK DOCTOR* 



Copyright^ iBgfip l>y Genr^c Ncwnes, Limited. 



as his professional. A remarkable surgical 
cure in the case of the Hon. James Lowry, 
the second son of Lord Bel ton, was the 
means of introducing him to county society, 
where he became a favourite through the 
charm of his conversation and the elegance 
of his manners. An absence of antecedents 
and of relatives is sometimes an aid rather 
than an impediment to social advancement, 
and the distinguished individuality of the 
handsome doctor was its own recommenda- 
tion. 

His patients had one 
fault — and one fault only 
— to find with him. He 
appeared to be a con- 
firmed bachelor. This 
was the more remarkable 
since the house which he 
occupied was a large one, 
and it was known that his 
success in practice had 
enabled him to save con- 
siderable sums. At first 
the local match-makers 
were continually coupling 
his name with one or 
other of the eligible 
ladies, but as years passed 
and Doctor Lana re- 
mained unmarried, it 
came to be generally 
understood that for some 
reason he must remain 
a bachelor. Some even 
went so far as to assert 
that he was already 
married, and that it was 
in order to escape the 
consequence of an early 
misalliance that he had 
buried himself at Bishop's 
Crossing. And then, just 
as the match-makcrs had 
finally given him up in despair, his engage- 
ment was suddenly announced to Miss 
Frances Morton, of Iveigh Hall. 

Miss Morton was a young lady who was 
well known upon the country-side, her father, 
James Hal da tie Morton, having been the 
Squire of Bishop's Crossing* Both her parents 
were, however, dead, and she lived with her 
only brother, Arthur Morton, who had in- 



YERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



ROUND THE FIRE. 



373 



herited the family estate. In person Miss 
Morton was tall and stately, and she was 
famous for her quick, impetuous nature and 
for her strength of character. She met Dr. 
Lana at a garden-party, and a friendship, 
which quickly ripened into love, sprang up 
between them. Nothing could exceed their 
devotion to each other. There was some 
discrepancy in age, he being thirty-seven, and 
she twenty-four ; but, save in that one respect, 
there was no possible objection to be found 
with the match. The engagement was in 
February, and it was arranged that the 
marriage should take place in August 

Upon the 3rd of June Dr. Lana received 
a letter from abroad. In a small village the 
postmaster is also in a position to be the 
gossip-master, and Mr. Bankley, of Bishop's 
Crossing, had many of the secrets of his 
neighbours in his possession. Of this par- 
ticular letter he remarked only that it was in 
a curious envelope, that it was in a man's 
handwriting, that the postscript was Buenos 
Ayres, and the stamp of the Argentine Re- 
public. It was the first letter which he had 
ever known Dr. Lana have from abroad, and 
this was the reason why his attention was 
particularly called to it before he handed it 
*o the local postman. It was delivered by 
the evening delivery of that date. 

Next morning — that is, upon the. 4th of 
June— Dr. Lana called upon Miss Morton, 
and a long interview followed, from which he 
was observed to return in a state of great 
agitation. Miss Morton remained in her 
room all that day, and her maid found her 
several times in tears. In the course of a 
week it was an open secret to the whole 
village that the engagement was at an end, that 
Dr. Lana had behaved shamefully to the young 
lady, and that Arthur Morton, her brother, 
was talking of horse- whipping him. In what 
particular respect the doctor had behaved 
badly was unknown — some surmised one 
thing and some another ; but it was observed, 
and taken as the obvious sign of a guilty 
conscience, that he would go for miles round 
rather than pass the windows of I>eigh Hall, 
and that he gave up attending morning 
service upon Sundays where he might have 
met the young lady. There was an advertise- 
ment also in the Lancet -as to the sale of a 
practice which mentioned no names, but 
which was thought by some to refer to 
Bishop's Crossing, and to mean that Dr. 
I,ana was thinking of abandoning the scene 
of his success. Such was the position 
of affairs when, upon the evening of 
Monday, June 21st, there came a fresh 

O 



development which changed what had been 
a mere village scandal into a tragedy 
which arrested the attention of the whole 
nation. Some detail is necessary to cause 
the facts of that evening to present their full 
significance. 

The sole occupants of the doctor's house 
were his housekeeper, an elderly and most 
respectable woman, named Martha Woods, 
and a young servant — Mary Pilling. The 
coachman and the surgery-boy slept out. It 
was the custom of the doctor to sit at night 
in his study, which was next the surgery in 
the wing of the house which was farthest 
from the servants' quarters. .This side of the 
house had a door of its own for the con- 
venience of patients, so that it was possible 
for the doctor to admit and receive a visitor 
there without the knowledge of anyone. As 
a matter of fact, when patients came late it 
was quite usual for him to let them in and 
out by the surgery entrance, for the maid and 
the housekeeper were in the habit of retiring 
early. 

On this particular night Martha Woods 
went into the doctor's study at half-past nine, 
and found him writing at his desk. She 
bade him good-night, sent the maid to bed, 
and then occupied herself until a quarter to 
eleven in household matters. It was striking 
eleven upon the hall clock when she went to 
her own room. She had been there about a 
quarter of an hour or twenty minutes when 
she heard a cry or call, which appeared to 
come from within the house. She waited 
some time, but it was not repeated. Much 
alarmed, for the sound was loud and urgent, 
she put on a dressing-gown, and ran at the 
top of her speed to the doctor's study. 

" Who's there ? " cried a voice, as she 
tapped at the door. 

" I am here, sir — Mrs. Woods." 

"I beg that you will leave me in peace. 
Go back to your room this instant ! " cried 
the voice, which was, to the best of her 
belief, that of her master. The tone was so 
harsh and so unlike her master's usual 
manner, that she was surprised and hurt. 

" I thought I heard you calling, sir," she 
explained, but no answer was given to her. 
Mrs. Woods looked at the clock as she re- 
turned to her room, and it was then half-past 
eleven. 

At some period between eleven and twelve 
(she could not be positive as to the exact 
hour) a patient called upon the doctor and 
was unable to get any reply from him. This 
late visitor was Mrs. Madding, the wife of 
the village grocer, who was dangerously ill of 

IVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



374 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 







AM HERE, SIR— MRS. WOODS* 



typhoid fever. Dr. Lana had asked her to 
look in the last thing and let him know how 
her husband was progressing. She observed 
that the light was burning in the study, but 
having knocked several times at the surgery 
door without response, she concluded that 
the doctor had been called out, and so re- 
turned home. 

There is a short, winding drive with a lamp 
at the end of it leading down from the house 
to the road, As Mrs, Madding emerged 
from the gate a man was coming along the foot- 
path. Thinking that it might be Dr, I,ana 
returning from some professional visit, she 
waited for him, and was surprised to see that 
it was Mr. Arthur Morton, the young squire. 
In the light of the lamp she observed that his 
manner was excited, and that he carried in 
his hand a heavy hunting-crop. He was 
turning in at the gate when she addressed 
him. 

" The doctor is not in, sir/ 1 said she* 
" How do you know that ? " he asked, 
harshly, 

" 1 have been to the surgery door, sir." 
"I see a light/ 3 said the young squire, 
looking up the drive. "That is in his study, 
is it not ? * 

" Yes, sir ; but lam sure that he is out." 
"Well, he must come in again," said 
young Morton, and passed through the gnte 
while Mrs, Madding went upon her home- 
ward way. 



by Google 



At three 
o'clock that 
morning her 
husband suf- 
fered a sharp 
relapse, and she 
was so alarmed 
by his symp- 
toms that she 
determined to 
call the doctor 
without delay. 
As she passed 
through the gate 
she was sur- 
prised to see 
someone lurk- 
ing among the 
laurel bushes. It 
was certainly a 
man, and to the 
best of her be- 
lief Mr. Arthur 
Morton, Preoc- 
cupied with her 
own troubles, 
she gave no particular attention to the 
incident, but hurried on upon her errand. 

When she reached the house she perceived 
to her surprise that the light was still burning 
in the study. She therefore tapped at the 
surgery door. There was no answer. She 
repeated the knocking several times without 
effect It appeared to her to be unlikely 
that the doctor would either go to bed or go 
out leaving so brilliant a light behind him, 
and it struck Mrs, Madding that it was pos- 
sible that he might have dropped asleep in 
his chair. She tapped at the study window, 
therefore, but without result, Then, finding 
that there was an opening between the curtain 
and the woodwork, she looked through. 

The small room was brilliantly lighted from 
a large lamp on the central table, which was 
littered with the doctor's books and instru- 
ments. No one was visible, nor did she see 
anything unusual, except that in the further 
shadow thrown by the table a dingy white 
glove was lying upon the carpet. And then 
suddenly, as her eyes became more accus^ 
tomed to the light, a boot emerged from the 
other end of the shadow, and she real i zed y 
with a thrill of horror, that what she had 
taken to be a glove was the hand of a man, 
who was prostrate upon the floor. Under- 
standing that something terrible had occurred, 
she rang at the front door, roused Mrs. 
Woods, the housekeeper, and the two women 
made their I*$jt|in1s1 H&. study, having first 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



ROUND THE FIRE. 



375 




IT WAS MR. AHTHUR MORTON, THF. TOtfKG SQUIRE* 



dispatched the maidservant to the police- 
station. 

At the side of the table, away from the 
window, Dr. Lana was discovered stretched 
upon his back and quite dead. It was 
evident that he had been .subjected to 
violence, for one of his eyes was blackened, 
and there were marks of bruises about his 
face and neck. A slight thickening and 
swelling of his features appeared to suggest 
that the cause of his death had been strangu- 
lation. He was dressed in his usual pro- 
fessional clothes, but wore cloth slippers, the 
soles of which were perfectly clean. The 
carpet was marked all over, especially on the 
side of the door, with traces of dirty boots, 
which were presumably left by the murderer. 
It was evident that someone had entered by 
the surgery door, had killed the doctor, and 
had then made his escape unseen. That the 
assailant was a man was certain, from the 
size of the footprints and from the nature of 
the injuries. But beyond that point the 
police found it very difficult to go. 

There were no signs of robbery, and the 
doctor's gold watch was safe in his pocket. 



He kept a heavy 
cash - box in the 
room, and this was 
discovered to be 
locked but empty. 
Mrs, Woods had 
an impression that 
a large sum was 
usually kept there, 
but the doctor had 
paid a heavy corn 
bill in cash only 
that very day, and 
it was conjectured 
that it was to this 
and not to a robber 
that the emptiness 
of the box w T as 
due. One thing 
in the room was 
missing — but that 
one thing was sug- 
gestive. The por- 
trait of Miss 
Morton, which had 
always stood upon 
the side-table, had 
been taken from 
its frame and 
carried off. Mrs. 
Woods had ob- 
served it there 
when she waited 
upon her employer that evening, and now 
it was gone. On the other hand, there 
was picked up from the floor a green eye- 
patch, which the housekeeper could not 
remember to have seen before. Such a patch 
might, however, be in the possession of a 
doctor, and there was nothing to indicate that 
it was in any way connected with the crime. 

Suspicion could only turn in one direction, 
and Arthur Morton, the young squire, was 
immediately arrested. The evidence against 
him was circumstantial, but damning. He 
was devoted to his sister, and it was shown 
that since the rupture between her and Dr* 
I^ana he had been heard again and again to 
express himself in the most vindictive terms 
towards her former lover. He had, as stated, 
been seen somewhere about eleven o'clock 
entering the doctor's drive with a hunting- 
crop in his hand. He had then, according 
to the theory of the police, broken in upon 
the doctor, whose exclamation of fear or of 
anger had been loud enough to attract the 
attention of Mrs. Woods, When Mrs. 
Woods descended, Dr. Lana had made up 
his mind'^iffllMlitfw'Br with his visitor, and 
tfERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



376 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



had, therefore, sent his housekeeper back to 
her room. This conversation had lasted a long 
time, had become more and more fiery, and had 
ended by a personal struggle, in which the 
doctor lost his life. The fact, revealed by a 
post mortem, that his heart was much diseased 
— an ailment quite unsuspected during his 
life— would make it possible that death might 
in his case ensue from injuries which would 
not be fatal to a healthy man. Arthur 
Morton had then removed his sister's photo- 
graph, and had made his way homeward, 
stepping aside into the laurel bushes to avoid 
Mrs. Madding at the gate. This was the 
theory of the prosecution, and the case 
which they presented was a formidable one. 

On the other hand, there were sortie strong 
points for the defence. Morton was high- 
spirited and impetuous, like his sister, but he 
was respected and liked by everyone, and 
his frank and honest nature seemed to be 
incapable of such a crime. His own explana- 
tion was that he was anxious to have a con- 
versation with Dr. Lana about some urgent 
family matters (from first to last he refused 
even to mention the name of his sister). He 
did not attempt to deny that this conversation 
would probably have been of an unpleasant 
nature. He heard from a patient that the 
doctor was out, and he therefore waited until 
about three in the morning for his return, 
but as he had seen nothing of him up to that 
hour, he had given it up and had returned 
home. As to his death, he knew no more 
about it than the constable who arrested him. 
He had formerly been an intimate friend 
of the deceased man; but circumstances, 
which he would prefer not to mention, had 
brought about a change in his sentiments. 

There were several facts which supported 
his innocence. It was certain that Dr. Lana 
was alive and in his study at half-past eleven 
o'clock. Mrs. Woods was prepared to swear 
that it was at that hour that she had heard 
his voice. The friends of the prisoner con- 
tended that it was probable that at that time 
Dr. Lana was not alone. The sound which 
had originally attracted the attention of the 
housekeeper, and her master's unusual im- 
patience that she should leave him in peace, 
seemed to point to that If this were so, 
then it appeared to be probable that he 
had met his end between the moment 
when the housekeeper heard his voice and 
the time when Mrs. Madding made her first 
call and found it impossible to attract his 
attention. But if this were the time of his 
death, then it was certain that Mr. Arthur 
Morton could not be guilty, as it was after 

-D 



this that she had met the young squire at the 
gate. 

If this hypothesis were correct, and some- 
one was with Dr. Lana before Mrs. Madding 
met Mr. Arthur Morton, then who was this 
someone, and what motives had he for 
wishing evil to the doctor ? It was universally 
admitted that if the friends of the accused 
could throw light upon this, they would 
have gone a long way towards establish- 
ing his innocence. But in the meanwhile 
it was open to the public to say — as 
they did say — that there was no proof that 
anyone had been there at all except the 
young squire ; while, on the other hand, there 
was ample proof that his motives in going 
were of a sinister kind. When Mrs. Madding 
called, the doctor might have retired to his 
room, or he might, as she thought at the time, 
have gone out and returned afterwards to 
find Mr. Arthur Morton waiting for him. 
Some of the supporters of the accused 
laid stress upon the fact that the photo- 
graph of his sister Frances, which had been 
removed from the doctor's room, had not 
been found in her brother's possession. 
This argument, however, did not count for 
much, as he had ample time before his arrest 
to burn it or to destroy it. As to the only 
positive evidence in the case — the muddy foot- 
marks upon the floor — they were so blurred 
by the softness of the carpet that it was 
impossible to make any trustworthy deduction 
from them. The most that could be said 
was that their appearance was . not incon- 
sistent with the theory that they were made 
by the accused, and it was further shown that 
his boots were very muddy upon that night 
There had been a heavy shower in the after- 
noon, and all boots were probably in the 
same condition. 

Such is a bald statement of the singular 
and romantic series of events which centred 
public attention upon this Lancashire tragedy. 
The unknown origin of the doctor, his curious 
and distinguished personality, the position of 
the man who was accused of the murder, 
and the love affair which had preceded the 
crime, all combined to make the affair one of 
those dramas which absorb the whole interest 
of a nation. Throughout the three kingdoms 
men discussed the case of the Black Doctor 
of Bishop's Crossing, and many were the 
theories put forward to explain the facts ; but 
it may safely be said that among them all 
there was not one which prepared the minds 
of the public for the extraordinary sequel, 
which caused so much excitement upon 
the first day of the trial, and came to a 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



THE CHAMPION HORSE-BREAKER. 



387 



power to handle the most vicious horse. A 
glance at the next illustration shows another 
part of the first lesson, called the drum care. 
An ordinary big drum is placed on the 
horse's back and head alternately, and 
beaten first gently and then louder, until 
the horse stands perfectly still. 

The training of kickers is one of Professor 
Smith's strong points, and the process causes 
much merriment among the audience. 




THE TIN-JHAM CUfifc 



A number of noisy tin pans, strongly fixed 
together, are tied to the horse's hind-quarters, 
a little above the tail, and then the fun 
begins fast and furious. The horse lashes 
out for all he h 
worth. The Pro- 
fessor walks behind, 
generally at a safe 
distance, but some- 
times almost too 
near to seem plea- 
sant. Soon the 
kicking loses much 
of its vigour, energy 
gives way to fatigue, 
foolishness suc- 
cumbs to common 
sense. The horse 
begins to realize 
that the pans are 
very commonplace 
things, and hardly 
worth so much 
attention. It is 
then that the won- 
derful intelligence 
of a horse is seen 

to the best advantage. He will give a 
little hop or two, look behind, see that all is 
quiet and snug— and give in. That is the 

Digitized by W 



first part of the kicking cure. The second, 
the paper cure, is no less amusing and 
effective. A couple of large bundles of 
papers are hung on in the same way as 
the pans, and the fun begins anew. But the 
previous lesson has done mueh towards the 
kicker's education. He soon realizes that 
his efforts are futile, and the kicking cure is 
complete. In cases of great viciousness and 
obstinacy, the H foot-strap" is used, This is 

a very simple con- 
trivance, also of 
the Professors in- 
vention, and con- 
sists of a foot-strap 
and rope whereby 
one of the front 
legs is drawn up at 
will by the trainer. 
The horse stand- 
ing on one fore-leg 
only is practically 
unable to kick, and 
after a time he be- 
comes so anxious 
that his leg should 
be left him for 
use, that he fears 
to kick lest it 
should be drawn up again. 

The kicking cure, however, is not without 
its dangers, as the following anecdote will 
show. It was in Johannesburg that Professor 




THE I'AE'EK: CUKE* 



Smith met with one of (he most serious 
accidents that has, as yet, befallen him. He 
was engaged in handling a vicious, kicking 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



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THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



she replied that she did not feel that she had 
any grievance whatever against Dr. Lana, 
and that in her opinion he had acted in a 
perfectly honourable manner. Her brother, 
on an insufficient knowledge of the facts, 
had taken another view, and she was 
compelled to acknowledge that, in spite 
of her entreaties, he had uttered threats 
of personal violence against the doctor, and 
had, upon the evening of the tragedy, an- 
nounced his intention of " having it out with 
him." She had done her best to bring him 
to a more reasonable frame of mind, but he 
was very headstrong where his emotions or 
prejudices were concerned. 

Up to this point the young lady's evidence 
had appeared to make against the prisoner 
rather than in his favour. The questions of 
her counsel, however, soon put a very different 
light upon the matter, and disclosed an un- 
expected line of defence. 

Mr. Humphrey : Do you believe your 
brother to be guilty of this crime ? 

The Judge : I cannot permit that question, 
Mr. Humphrey. We are here to decide upon 
questions of fact — not of belief. 

Mr. Humphrey : Do you know that your 
brother is not guilty of the death of Doctor 
Lana? 

M iss Morton : Yes. 

Mr. Humphrey : How do you know it? 

Miss Morton : Because Dr. Lana is not 
dead. 

There followed a prolonged sensation in 
court, which interrupted the cross examina- 
tion of the witness. 

Mr. Humphrey : And how do you know, 
Miss Morton, that Dr. lana is not dead? 

Miss Morton : Because I have received a 
letter from him since the date of his supposed 
death. 

Mr. Humphrey : Have you this letter? 

Miss Morton : Yes, but I should prefer not 
to show it. 

Mr. Humphrey : Have you the envelope ? 

Miss Morton : Yes, it is here. 

Mr. Humphrey : What is the post-mark? 

Miss Morton : Liverpool. 

Mr. Humphrey : And the date ? 

Miss Morton : June the 22nd. 

Mr. Humphrey : That being the day after 
his alleged death. Are you prepared to 
swear to this handwriting, Miss Morton? 

Miss Morton : Certainly. 

Mr. Humphrey : I am prepared to call six 
other witnesses, my lord, to testify that this 
letter is in the writing of Doctor I ana. 

The Judge : Then you must call them to 
morrow. 

by L^OOgle 



Mr. Porlock Carr (counsel for the prosecu- 
tion) : In the meantime, my lord, we claim 
possession of this document, so that we may 
obtain expert evidence as to how far it is an 
imitation of the handwriting of the gentleman 
whom we still confidently assert to be 
deceased. I need not point out that the 
theory so unexpectedly sprung upon us may 
prove to be a very obvious device adopted by 
the friends of the prisoner in order to divert 
this inquiry. I would draw attention to the 
fact that the young lady must, according to 
her own account, have possessed this letter 
during the proceedings at the inquest and at 
the police-court. She desires us to believe 
that she permitted these to proceed, although 
she held in her pocket evidence which would 
at any moment have brought them to an end. 

Mr. Humphrey : Can you explain this, 
Miss Morton ? 

Miss Morton : Dr. Lana desired his secret 
to be preserved. 

Mr. Porlock Carr: Then why have you 
now made this public? 

Miss Morton : To save my brother. 

A murmur of sympathy broke out in court, 
which was instantly suppressed by the Judge. 

The Judge : Admitting this line of defence, 
it lies with you, Mr. Humphrey, to throw 
a light upon who this man is whose body 
has been recognised by so many friends 
and patients of Dr. I .ana as being that of 
the doctor himself. 

A Juryman : Has anyone up to now ex- 
pressed any doubt about the matter ? 

Mr. Porlock Carr : Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Humphrey : We hope to make the 
matter clear. 

The Judge : Then the Court adjourns 
until tomorrow. 

This new development of the case excited 
the utmost interest among the general public. 
Press comment was prevented by the fact 
that the trial was still undecided, " but the 
question was everywhere argued as to how 
far there could be truth in Miss Morton's 
declaration, and how far it might be a daring 
ruse for the purpose of saving her brother. 
The obvious dilemma in which the missing 
doctor stood was that if by any extraordinary 
chance he was not dead, then he must be 
held responsible for the death of this 
unknown man, who resembled him so 
exactly, and who was found in his 
study. This letter which Miss Morton 
refused to produce was possibly a confes- 
sion of guilt, and she might find herself in 
the terrible position of only being able to 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



THE CHAMPION HORSE BREAKER. 



3S9 



realizes your power over him, he will 
almost anything that a horse could do." 

Our illustrations 
will give a vury good 
idea of the wrestling 
and throwing feat. 
In the first place, 
the horse's front leg 
is being pulled up 
and tht, . Hkjw pres- 
sure is begun ; then 
we have a snap-shot 
of the actual throw- 
ing, when both 



do 




WKESTL1NG, 



horse and trainer fall together ; while the 
third picture shows the horse on the ground, 
being educated to stand the 
various startling sounds and 
acts, such as the cracking 
of the whip, the beating of 
the drum, the waving of the 
flag, and the rattling of tin 
pans. The horse shown 
here is a powerful creature ; 
a huge van-horse, very 
vicious and heavy. The 
process of throwing, how- 
ever, only took a little under 
two minutes, and those 
who were fortunate enough 
to witness the struggle 
were unanimous in their 
admiration of the plucky 
feat. 

When people first 
hear of the marvellous 
changes Mr. Smith can effect in the temper, 
behaviour, and even character of horses, they 
are more or less sceptical. Rut seeing is 
believing, and after a visit to the exhibition 
they come away quite convinced of the power 
possessed by the wonderful horse- tamer. 
"There was an old lady in Manchester," 
remarked the Professor, u a genial old soul, 
who told me after the show that she did 
not think it possible for a man to have 
such power over vicious beasts. She 
was talking in this strain for a good 
while, about horses and their tempers, the 
way to manage them and so on, and I was 




A I ILK J 1 1 £ WRE.STLLNO 



oogle 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



38* 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE, 



named Ernest, whose resemblance to me was 
so great that even when we were together 
people could see no difference between us, 
Down to the smallest detail we were exactly 
the same. As we grew older this likeness 
became less marked because our expression 
was not the same, but with our features 
in repose the points of difference were very 
slight 

"It does not become me to say too much 
of one who is dead, the more so as he is my 
only brother, but 
I leave his char- 
acter to those 
who knew him 
best, I will only 
say— for I have 
to say it — that 
in my early man- 
hood I conceived 
a horror of him, 
and that I had 
good reason for 
the aversion 
which filled me. 
My own reputa- 
tion suffered 
from his actions, 
for our close 
resem b la nee 
caused me to be 
credited with many 
them. Eventually, in a 
peculiarly disgraceful busi- 
ness, he contrived to 
throw the whole odium upon me 
in such a way that I was forced 
to leave the Argentine for ever, 
and to seek a career in Europe, The 
freedom from his hated presence more 
than compensated me for the loss of my 
native land. I had enough money to 
defray my medical studies at Glasgow, and I 
finally settled in practice at Bishop's Crossing, 
in the firm conviction that in that remote 
Lancashire hamlet I should never hear of 
him again. 

" For years my hopes were fulfilled, and 
then at last he discovered ine. Some Liver- 
pool man who visited Buenos Ayres put him 
upon my track. He had lost all his money, 
and he thought that he would come over and 
share mine, Knowing my horror of him, he 
rightly thought that I would be willing to buy 
him off. I received a letter from him saying that 
he was coming. It was at a crisis in my own 
affairs, and his arrival might conceivably bring 
trouble, and even disgrace, upon some whom 
I was especially bound to shield from anything 

Digitized by G 



of the kind I took steps to insure that any 
evil which might come should fall on me only, 
and that" — here he turned and looked at 
the prisoner — "was the cause of conduct 
upon my part which has been too harshly 
judged. My only motive was to screen those 
who were dear to me from any possible 
connection with scandal or disgrace. That 
scandal and disgrace would come with my 
brother was only to say that what had been 
would be again. 




'l HEARD A FOOTSTEP UftJfJ THE UHAVF.l, OU TSIl>E. " 

" My brother arrived himself one night not 
very long after my receipt of the letter, I 
was sitting in my study after the servants 
had gone to bed, when I heard a footstep 
upon the gravel outside, and an instant later 
I saw his face looking in at me through the 
window. He was a clean-shaven man like 
myself, and the resemblance between us was 
still so great that, for an instant, I thought it 
was my own reflection in the glass. He had 
a dark patch over his eye, but our features 
were absolutely the same. Then he smiled 
in a sardonic way which had been a trick of 
his from his boyhood, and I knew that he 
was the same brother who had driven me 
from my native land, and brought disgrace 
upon what had been an honourable name. 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



ROUND THE FIRE. 



38i 



I went to the door and I admitted him. That 
would be about ten o'clock that night. 

"When he came into the glare of the 
lamp, I saw at once that he had fallen upon 
very evil days. He had walked from Liver- 
pool, and hje was tired and ill. I was quite 
shocked by the expression upon his face. 
My medical knowledge told me that there 
was some serious internal malady. He 
had been drinking also, and his face was 
bruised as the result of a scuffle which he had 
had with some sailors. It was to cover his 
injured eye that he wore this patch, which he 
removed when he entered the room. He 
was himself dressed in a pea-jacket and 
flannel shirt, and his feet were bursting 
through his boots. But his poverty had only 
made him more savagely vindictive towards 
me. His hatred rose to the height of a 
mania. I had been rolling in money in 
England, according to his account, while he 
had been starving in South America. I 
cannot describe to you the threats which he 
uttered or the insults which he poured upon 
me. My impression is, that hardships and 
debauchery had unhinged his reason. He 
paced about the room like a wild beast, 
demanding drink, demanding money, and 
all in the foulest language. I am a hot- 
tempered man, but I thank God that I 
am able to say that I remained master 
of myself, and that I never raised a hand 
against him. My coolness only irritated him 
the more. He raved, he cursed, he shook 
his fists in my face, and then suddenly a 
horrible spasm passed over his features, he 
clapped his hand to his side, and with a loud 
cry he fell in a heap at my feet. I raised 
him up and stretched him upon the sofa, but 
no answer came to my exclamations, and the 
hand which I held in mine was cold and 
clammy. His diseased heart had broken 
down. His own violence had killed him. 

" For a long time I sat as if I were in 
some dreadful dream, staring at the body of 
my brother. I was aroused by the knocking 
of Mrs. Woods, who had been disturbed by 
that dying cry. I sent her away to bed. 
Shortly afterwards a patient tapped at the 
surgery door, but as I took no notice, he or 
she went off again. Slowly and gradually as 
I sat there a plan was forming itself in my 
head in the curious automatic way in which 
plans do form. When I rose from my chair 
my future movements were finally decided 
upon without my having been conscious of 
any process of thought. It was an instinct 
which irresistibly inclined me towards one 
course. 

Digitized by L*OOgle 



" Ever since that change in my affairs to 
which I have alluded, Bishop's Crossing had 
become hateful to me. My plans of life 
had been ruined, and I had met with hasty 
judgments and unkind treatment where I 
had expected sympathy. It is true that any 
danger of scandal from my brother had 
passed away with his life ; but still, I was sore 
about the past, and felt that things could 
never be as they had been. It may be that 
I was unduly sensitive, and that I had not 
made sufficient allowance for others, but my 
feelings were as I describe. Any chance of 
getting away from Bishop's Crossing and of 
everyone in it would be most welcome to 
me. And here was such a chance as I could 
never have dared to hope for, a chance which 
would enable me to make a clean break with 
the past. 

" There was this dead man lying upon the 
sofa, so like me that save for some little 
thickness and coarseness of the features there 
was no difference ^t all. No one had seen 
him come and no one would miss him. We 
were both clean shaven, and his hair was 
about the same length as my own. If I 
changed clothes with him, then Dr. Aloysius 
Lana would be found lying dead in his study, 
and there would be an end of "an unfortunate 
fellow, and of a blighted career. There was 
plenty of ready money in the room, and this 
I could carry away with me to help me to 
start once more in some other land. In my 
brother's clothes I could walk by night 
unobserved as far as Liverpool, and in that 
great seaport I would soon find some means 
of leaving the country. After my lost hopes, 
the humblest existence where I was unknown 
was far preferable in my estimation to a 
practice, however successful, in Bishop's 
Crossing, where at any moment I might come 
face to face with those whom I should wish, 
if it were possible, to forget I determined 
to effect the change. 

"And I did so. I will not go into par- 
ticulars, for the recollection is as painful as 
the experience; but in an hour my. brother 
lay, dressed down to the smallest detail in 
my clothes, while I slunk out by the surgery 
door, and taking the back path which led 
across some fields, I started off to make the 
best of my way to Liverpool, where I arrived 
the same night. My bag of money and a 
certain portrait were all I carried out of the 
house, and I left behind me in my hurry the 
shade which my brother had been wearing 
over his eye. Everything else of his I took 
with mt . 

" 1 give pniiqm^lilvieQrd} sir, that never for 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



38* 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



one instant did the idea occur to me that 
people might think that I had been murdered, 
nor did I imagine that anyone might be 
caused serious danger through this stratagem 
by which I endeavoured to gain a fresh 
start in the world 
On the contrary, it 
was the thought of 
relieving others from 
the burden of my 
presence which was 
always uppermost in 
my mind, A sailing 
vessel was leaving 
Liverpool that very 
day for Corunna, 
and in this I took 
my passage, think- 
ing that the voyage 
would give me time 
to recover my 
balance, and to con- 
sider the future. But 
before I left my 
resolution softened- 
I bethought me that 
there was one person 
in the worl/1 to 
whom I would not 
cause an hour of 
sadness. She would 
mourn me in her 
heart, however harsh 
and unsympathetic 
her relatives might 
be. She understood 
and appreciated the 
motives upon which 
I had acted, and if the rest of her family 
condemned me, she, at least, would not 
forget. And so I sent her a note under 
the seal of secrecy to save her from a 
baseless grief. If under the pressure of events 
she broke that seal, she has my entire 
sympathy and forgiveness. 

u It was only last night that I returned to 
England, and during all this time I have 
heard nothing of the sensation which my 
supposed death had caused, nor of the accu- 



vestigation 



1 t SLUNK OUT BV THE SURCitHV DOOK. 



sation that Mr. Arthur Morton had been 
concerned in it It was in a late evening 
paper that I read an account of the proceed- 
ings of yesterday, and I have come this 
morning as fast as an express train could bring 

me to testify to the truth." 

-■ 

Such was the remarkable state- 
ment of Dr. Aloysius Lana which 
brought the trial to a sudden 
termination, A subsequent in- 
corroborated it to 
the extent of find- 
ing out the vessel 
in which his brother 
Ernest I^ana had 
come over from 
South America. The 
ship's doctor was 
able to testify that 
he had complained 
of a weak heart 
during the voyage, 
and that his symp- 
toms were consistent 
with such a death as 
was described. 

As to Dr. Aloysius 
Lana, he returned 
to the village from 
which he had made 
so dramatic a dis- 
appear nee> and a 
complete reconcilia- 
tion was effected between him and 
the young squire, the latter having 
acknowledged that he had entirely 
misunderstood the other's motives 
in withdrawing from his engage- 
ment. That another reconciliation followed 
may he judged from a notice extracted from a 
prominent column in the Morning Post : — 

"A marriage was solemnized upon Sep- 
tember 19th, by the Rev. Stephen Johnson, 
at the parish church of Bishop's Crossing, 
between Aloysius Xavier I -ana, son of Don 
Alfredo Lana, formerly Foreign Minister of the 
Argentine Republic, and Frances Morton, only 
daughter of the late James Morton, J. P., of 
Leigh Hall, Bishop's Crossing, Lancashire." 




by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



THE CHAMPION HORSE BREAKER, 



393 



ring. No, they were perfect demons then ; 
fifteen minutes later they stood the test without 
flinching, and were successfully photographed. 

The stories that have reached us of the 
wonderful feats per- 
formed by cowboys 
of the West in con- 
quering their tricky 
bronchos are daily 
verified by Pro- 
fessor Smith in his 
exhibitions. When 
a broncho once 
takes it into his 
head to a buck, :, he 
bucks so hard that 
his rider really does 
not know where he 
is* The twisting , 
twirling, and topsy- 
turvy tricks of the 
animal are marvel- 
lous to behold. 
The coloured gen- 
tleman in the saddle 
(most of the time 
he is half out of it) 
gets his salary for sticking on the horse ; and 
it almost looks as though the horse were 
especially engaged at a double salary to get 
him off. 

The modern horse's most modern bogey 
is the steam-roller — to him a most terrible 
engine of destruction and lumbering obnox- 




TUB BUCK- JUMPER* 



iousness. Round goes the roller, and up 
goes the horse— that is the sad, complete 
story of a thousand and one horses of the 
present day. Hence it is not surprising that 

the steam-roller 
should be one of 
Professor Smith's 
most modern appli- 
ances for curing a 
"shier." In our last 
illustration we may 
note one of the 
difficulties experi- 
enced in meeting a 
steam-roller. 

It is wonderful to 
note what a lot of 
paraphernalia a 
horse-tamer carries 
with him. Drums, 
flags, bells, rockets, 
steam-whistles and 
sirens, archways, 
newspapers, tin 
pans, harnesses, 
buggies (and emer- 
gency buggies!), 
miles of rope, umbrellas, and hay. All these 
are part of his stock in trade ; and we know 
that when the twentieth century comes in 
with its navigable balloons and flying 
machines, the Professor will be among the 
first to add these wonders to his stock for the 
edification of his nervous pupils. 




KOL'ND GOES THE ROLLER, ANU Ui' GOKtt THF HftKSfc. 



VoL XV i.— 50. 



by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



Miss Cayley's Adventures. 



By Grant Allen. 
VIIL— THE ADVENTURE OF THE PEA-GREEN PATRICIAN. 




WAY to India ! " A life on the 
ocean wave once more ; and — 
may it prove less wavy ! 

In plain prose, my arrange- 
ment with "my proprietor/' 
Mr. El worthy (thus w^e speak 
in the newspaper trade), included a trip to 
Bombay for myself and Elsie. So, as soon 
as we had drained Upper Egypt journalisti- 
cally dry, we returned to Cairo on our road 
to Suez. I am glad to say, my letters to the 
Daily Telephone gave satisfaction. My em- 
ployer wrote, "You are a born journalist." I 
confess this surprised me ; for I have always 
considered myself a truthful person. Still, 
as he evidently meant it for praise, I took 
the doubtful compliment in good part, and 
offered no remonstrance, 

I have a mercurial temperament My 
spirits rise and fall as if they were Consols. 
Monotonous Egypt de- 
pressed me, as it de- 
pressed the Israelites ; 
but the passage of the 
Red Sea set me sound- 
ing my timbrel. I love 
fresh air ; I love the sea, 
if the sea will but behave 
itself; and I positively 
revelled in the change 
from Egypt 

Unfortunately, we had 
taken our passages by a 
R and O. steamer from 
Suez to Bombay many 
weeks beforehand, so as 
to secure good berths ; 
and still more unfortu- 
nately, in a letter to 
I^ady Georgina, I had 
chanced to mention the 
name of our ship and 
the date of the voyage. 
I kept up a spasmodic 
correspondence with 
Lady Georgina nowa- 
days— tuppence- 
ha'penny a fortnight \ 
the dear, cantankerous, 
racy old lady had been 
the foundation of my 
fortunes, and I was 




AX OLD- LOOKING VOL'NG MAN, 



genuinely grateful to her ; or, rather, I 
ought to say, she had been their second 
foundress, for I will do myself the justice 
to admit that the first was my own initiative 
and enterprise. I flatter myself I have the 
knack of taking the tide on the turn, and 
I am justly proud of it. But, being a 
grateful animal, I wrote once a fortnight to 
report progress to Lady Georgina. Besides 
— let me w T hisper — strictly between ourselves 
— 'twas an indirect way of hearing about 
Harold. 

This time, however, as events turned out, 
I recognised that I had made a grave mistake 
in confiding my movements to my shrewd 
old lady. She did not betray me on purpose, 
of course ; but I gathered later that casually 
in conversation she must have mentioned the 
fact and date of my sailing before somebody 
who ought to have had no concern in it ; and 
the somebody, I found, 
had governed himself 
accordingly. All this, 
however, I only dis- 
covered afterwards. So, 
/ without anticipating, I 

will narrate the facts 
exactly as they occurred 
to me. 

When we mounted 
the gangway of the 
, Jumna at Suez, and 
began the process of 
frizzling down the Red 
Sea, I noted on deck 
almost at once an odd- 
looking young man of 
twenty - two or there- 
abouts, with a curious 
fa i n t pea - green com- 
plexiom He was the 
wishy - washiest young 
man I ever beheld in 
my life; an achromatic 
stud}' : in spite of the 
delicate pea - greeniness 
of his skin, all the 
colouring matter of the 
body seemed somehow 
to have faded out of 
him. Perhaps he had 
been bleached. As he 



by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



MISS CAYLEY'S ADVENTURES. 



395 



leant over the taffrail, gazing down with 
open mouth and vacant stare at the water, I 
took a good long look at him. He interested 
me much — because he was so exceptionally 
uninteresting; a pallid, anaemic, indefinite 
hobbledehoy, with a high, narrow forehead, 
and sketchy features. He had watery, restless 
eyes of an insipid light blue ; thin, yellow 
hair, almost white in its paleness ; and twitch- 
ing hands that played nervously all the time 
with a shadowy moustache. This shadowy 
moustache seemed to absorb as a rule the 
best part of his attention ; it was so sparse 
and so blanched that he felt it continually — to 
assure himself, no doubt, of the reality of its 
existence. I need hardly add that he wore 
an eye-glass. 

He was an aristocrat, I felt sure; Eton 
and Christ Church : no ordinary person 
could have been quite so flavourless. Imbe- 
cility like his is only to be attained as the 
result of long and judicious selection. 

He went on gazing in a vacant way at the 
water below, an ineffectual patrician smile 
playing feebly round the corners of his mouth 
meanwhile. Then he turned and stared at 
me as I lay back in my deck-chair. For a 
minute he looked me over as if I were a 
horse for sale. When he had finished 
inspecting me, he beckoned to somebody at 
the far end of the quarter-deck. 

The somebody sidled up with a deferential 
air which confirmed my belief in the pea- 
green young man's aristocratic origin. It 
was such deference as the British flunkey 
pays only to blue blood ; for he has grada- 
tions of flunkeydom. He is respectful to 
wealth ; polite to acquired rank ; but servile 
only to hereditary nobility. Indeed, you can 
make a rough guess at the social status of the 
person he addresses by observing which one 
of his twenty-seven nicely graduated manners 
he adopts in addressing him. 

The pea-green young man glanced over in 
my direction, and murmured something to 
the satellite, whose back was turned towards 
me. I felt sure, from his attitude, he was 
asking whether I was the person he suspected 
me to be. The satellite nodded assent, 
whereat the pea-green young man, screwing 
up his face to fix his eye-glass, stared harder 
than ever. He must be heir to a peerage, I 
felt convinced; nobody short of that rank 
would consider himself entitled to stare 
with such frank unconcern at an unknown 
lady. 

Presently it further occurred to me that 
the satellite's back seemed strangely familiar. 
" I have seen that man somewhere, Elsie," I 



by L^OOgle 



whispered, putting aside the wisps of hair 
that blew about my face. 

"So have I, dear/' Elsie answered, with a 
slight shudder. And I was instinctively 
aware that I too disliked him. 

As Elsie spoke, the man turned, and 
strolled slowly past us, with that ineffable 
insolence which is the other side of the 
flunkey's insufferable self-abasement. He 
•cast a glance at us as he went by, a withering 
glance of brazen effrontery. We knew him 
now, of course : it was that variable star, our 
old acquaintance, Mr. Higginson the courier. 

He was here as himself this time ; no 
longer the count or the mysterious faith- 
healer. The diplomat hid his rays under the 
garb of the man-servant. 

" Depend upon it, Elsie," I cried, clutching 
her arm with a vague sense of fear, "this 
man means mischief. There is danger 
ahead. When a creature of Higginson's sort, 
who has risen to be a count and a fashionable 
physician, descends again to be a courier, you 
may rest assured it is because he has some- 
thing to gain by it. He has some deep 
scheme afloat. And we are part of it." 

" His master looks weak enough and silly 
enough for anything," Elsie answered, eyeing 
the suspected lordling. " I should think he 
is just the sort of man such a wily rogue 
would naturally fasten upon." 

" When a wily rogue gets hold of a weak 
fool, who is also dishonest," I said, " the two 
together may make a formidable combination. 
But never mind. We're forewarned. I think 
I shall be even with him." 

That evening, at dinner in the saloon, the 
pea-green young man strolled in with a 
jaunty air and took his seat next to us. The 
Red Sea, by the way, was kinder than the 
Mediterranean : it allowed us to dine from 
the very first evening. Cards had been laid 
on the plates to mark our places. I glanced 
at my neighbour's. It bore the inscription, 
"Viscount Southminster." 

That was the name of Lord Kynaston's 
eldest son — Lady Georgina's nephew ; Harold 
Tillington's cousin ! So this was the man 
who might possibly inherit Mr. Marmaduke 
Ashurst's money ! I remembered now how 
often and how: fervently Lady Georgina had 
said, " Kynaston's sons are all fools." If the 
rest came up to sample, I was inclined to 
agree with her. 

It also flashed across me that Lord 
Southminster might have heard through 
Higginson of our meeting with Mr. Marma- 
duke Ashurst at Florence, and of my 
acquaintance with Harold Tillington at 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



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THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



Schlangenbad and Lungern. With a woman's 
instinct, I jumped at the fact that the pea- 
green young man had taken passage by this 
boat, on purpose to baffle both me and 
Harold. 

Thinking it over, it seemed to me, too, 
that he might have various possible points of 
view on the matter. He might desire, for 
example, that Harold should marry me, 
under the impression that his marriage with 
a penniless outsider would annoy his uncle; 
for the pea -green young man doubtless 
thought that 1 was still to Mr, Ashurst just 
that dreadful adventuress. If so, his obvious 
cue would be to promote a good under- 
standing between Harold and myself, in 
order to make us marry, so that the urbane 
old gentleman might then disinherit his 
favourite nephew, and make a new will in 
Lord Southminster's interest. Or again, the 
pea-green young man might, on the contrary, 
be aware that Mr 
Ashurst and I had 
got on admirably 
together when we 
met at Florence ; 
in which case his 
aim would naturally 
be to find out some- 
thing that might set 
the rich uncle 
against me. Yet 
once more, he J* 
might merely have 
heard that I had 
drawn up Uncle 
Marmaduke's will 
at the office, and 
he might desire to 

worm the contents of it out of me. Which- 
ever was his design, I resolved to be upon my 
guard in every word I said to him, and leave 
no door open to any trickery either way; 
For of one thing I felt sure, that the colour- 
less young man had torn himself away from 
the mud-honey of Piccadilly for this voyage 
to India only because he had heard there 
was a chance of meeting me. 

That was a politic move, whoever planned 
it — himself or Higginson ; for a week on 
board ship with a person or persons is the 
very best chance of getting thrown in with 
them ; whether they like it or lump it, they 
can't easily avoid you. 

It was while I was pondering these things 
in my mind, and resolving with myself not to 
give myself away, that the young man with 
the pea-green face lounged in and dropped 
into the next seat to me* He was dressed 




(amongst other things) in a dinner jacket and 
a white tie ; for myself, I detest such fopperies 
on board ship ; they seem to me out of place : 
they conflict with the infinite possibilities of 
the situation. One stands too near the 
realities of things. Evening dress and 
mal-de-mtr sort ill together 

As my neighbour sat down, he turned to 
me with an inane smile which occupied all 
his face. " Good evening," he said, in a 
baronial drawl. " Miss Cayley, I gathah ? 
I asked the skippah's leave to set next yah. 
We ought to be friends — rathah. I think 
yah know my poor deah old aunt, Lady 
Georgina Fawley." 

I bowed a somewhat freezing bow. " Lady 
Georgina is one of my dearest friends," I 
answered. 

"No, really? Poor deah old Georgey ! 
Got somebody to stick up for her at last, has 
she? Now, that's what I call chivalrous of 



*S&a 











*HE TURNED TO ME WITH Att INANE SMILE. 



by \*j 



Tt 



yah. Magnanimous, isn't it? I like to see 
people Stick up for their friends. And it 
must be a novelty for Georgey, For between 
you and me, a moah cantankerous, spiteful, 
acidulated old cough-drop than the poor deah 
soul it 'ud be difficult to hit upon," 

"Lady Georgina has brains," I answered ; 
"and they enable her to recognise a fool 
when she sees him. I will admit that she 
does not suffer fools gladly." 

He turned to me with a sudden, sharp 
look in the depths of the lack-lustre eyes. 
Already it began to strike me that, though 
the pea-green young man was inane, he had 
his due proportion of a certain insidious 
practical cunning. ( * That's true," he 
answered, measuring me. "And according 
to her, almost every body's a fool — especially 
her relations. There's a fine knack of 
sweeping generalization about deah skinny 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



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397 



old Georgey. The few people she reablly 
likes are all archangels ; the rest are blither- 
ing idiots ; there's no middle course with 
her." 

I held my peace frigidly. 

"She thinks me a very special and 
peculiah fool," he went on, crumbling his 
bread. 

" Lady Georgina," I answered, " is a 
person of exceptional discrimination. I 
would almost always accept her judgment 
on anyone as practically final." 

He laid down his soup-spoon, fondled the 
imperceptible moustache with his tapering 
fingers, and then broke once more into a 
cheerful expanse of smile which reminded me 
of nothing so much as of the village idiot 
It spread over his face as the splash from a 
stone spreads over a mill-pond. " Now that's 
a nice cheerful sort of thing to say to a 
fellah," he ejaculated, fixing his eye-glass in 
his eye, with a few fierce contortions of his 
facial muscles. "That's encouraging, don't 
yah know, as the foundation of an acquaint- 
ance. Makes a good cornah-stone. Calcu- 
lated to place things at once upon what yah 
call a friendly basis. Georgey said you had 
a pretty wit ; I see now why she admiahed 
it. Birds of a feathah : very wise old pro- 
verb." 

I reflected that, after all, this young man 
had nothing overt against him, beyond a fishy 
blue eye and an inane expression ; so, feeling 
that I had, perhaps, gone a little too far, I 
continued, after a minute, " And your uncle, 
how is he ? " 

" Marmy ? " he inquired, with another 
elephantine smile ; and then I perceived it 
was a form of humour with him (or rather, a 
cheap substitute) to speak of his elder relations 
by their abbreviated Christian names, with- 
out any prefix. " Marmy's doing very well, 
thank yah ; as well as could be expected. 
In fact, bettah. Habakkuk on the brain : it's 
carrying him off at last. He has Bright's 
disease very bad — drank port, don't yah 
know — and won't trouble this wicked world 
much longah with his presence. It will be a 
happy release — especially for his nephews." 

I was really grieved, for I had grown to 
like the urbane old gentleman, as I had grown 
to like the cantankerous old lady. In spite 
of his fussiness and his Stock Exchange views 
on the interpretation of Scripture, his genuine 
kindliness and his real liking for me had 
softened my heart to him ; and my face must 
have shown my distress, for the pea-green 
young man added quickly with an after- 
thought : " But you needn't be afraid, yah 



by L^OOgle 



know. It's all right for Harold Tillington. 
You ought to know that as well as anyone — and 
bettah : for it was you who drew up his will 
for him at Florence." 

I flushed crimson, I believe. Then he 
knew all about me ! "I was not asking on 
Mr. Tillington's account," I answered. " I 
asked because I have a personal feeling of 
friendship for your uncle, Mr. Ashurst." 

His hand strayed up to the straggling 
yellow hairs on his upper lip once more, and 
he smiled again, this time with a curious 
under-current of foolish craftiness. " That's 
a good one," he answered. " Georgey told 
me you were original. Marmy's a millionaire, 
and many people love millionaires for their 
money. But to love Marmy for himself — I 
do call that originality ! Why, weight for 
age, he's acknowledged to be the most por- 
tentous old boah in London society ! " 

"I like Mr. Ashurst because he has a 
kind heart and some genuine instincts," I 
answered. " He has not allowed all human 
feeling to be replaced by a cheap mask of 
Pall Mall cynicism." 

" Oh, I say ; how's that for preaching ? 
Don't you manage to give it hot to a fellah, 
neithah ! And at sight, too, without the 
usual three days of grace. Have some of 
my champagne? I'm a forgiving creechah." 

" No, thank you. I prefer this hock," 

" Your friend, then ? " And he motioned 
the steward to pass the bottle. 

To my great disgust, Elsie held out her 
glass. I was annoyed at that. It showed 
she had missed the drift of our conversa- 
tion, and was therefore lacking in feminine 
intuition. I should be sorry if I had allowed 
the higher mathematics to kill out in me the 
most distinctively womanly faculty. 

From that first day forth, however, in spite 
of this beginning, Lord Southminster almost 
persecuted me with his persistent attentions. 
He did all a fellah could possibly do to 
please me. I could not make out precisely 
what he was driving at ; but I saw he had 
some artful game of his own to play, and 
that he was playing it subtly. I also saw 
that, vapid as he was, his vapidity did 
not prevent him from being worldly wise 
with the wisdom of the self-seeking man 
of the world, who utterly distrusts and 
disbelieves in all the higher emotions of 
humanity. He harped so often on this string 
that on our second day out, as we lolled 
on deck in the heat, I had to rebuke him 
sharply. He had been sneering for some 
hours. " There are two kinds of silly sim- 
plicity, Ix>rd Southminster," I said, at last. 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



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THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



**One kind is the silly simplicity of the rustic 
who trusts everybody ; the other kind is the 
silly simplicity of the I'all Mall clubman who 
trusts nobody. It is just as foolish and just 
as one-sided to overlook the good as to over- 
look the evil in humanity. If you trust 
everyone* you are likely to be taken in ; but 
if you trust no one, you put yourself at a 
serious practical disadvantage, be sides losing 
half the joy of living/' 

"Then you think me a fool, like Georgey?" 
he broke out. 

M I should never be rude enough to say 
so," I answered, fanning myself, 

11 Well, you're what I call a first-rate com- 
panion for a voyage down the Red Sea," he 
put in, gazing abstractedly at the awnings. 
" Such a lovely freezing mixture ! A fellah 
doesn't need ices when you're on tap. I 
recommend you as a refrigeratah." 

"I am glad," I answered, demurely, "if 
I have secured your approbation in that 
humble capacity. I'm sure I 
have tried hard for it" 

Yet nothing that I could say 
seemed to put the man down. 
In spite of rebuffs, he was 
assiduous in running down the 
companion-ladder for my 
parasol or my smelling-bottle ; 
he fetched me chairs ; he stayed 
me with cushions; he offered 
to lend me books ; he pestered 
me to drink his wine; and he 
kept Elsie in champagne, which 
she annoyed me by accepting. 
Poor dear Elsie clearly failed 
to understand the creature, 
* 4 He's so kind and polite, 
Brownie, isn't he? ?t she would 
observe, in her simple fashion, 
"Do you know, I think he's 
taken quite a fancy to you ! 
And hell be an carl by-and by. 
I call it romantic. How lovely 
it would seem, dear, to see you 
a countess." 

"Elsie/ 5 I said, severely, with 
one hand on her arm, t4 you are a dear little 
soul, and I am very fond of you ; but if 
you think I could sell myself for a coronet 
to a pasty-faced young man with a pea- 
green complexion and glassy blue eyes— I 
can only say, my child, you have misread 
my character. He isn't a man ; he's a lump 
of putty 1 v 

I think Elsie was quite shocked that I 
should apply these terms to a courtesy 
lord, the eldest son of a peer. Nature had 



endowed her with the profound British 
belief that peers should be spoken of in 
choice and peculiar language. " If a peer's 
a fool," Lady Georgina said once to me, 
" people think you should say his tempera- 
ment does not fit him for the conduct of 
affairs : if he's a roue or a drunkard, they 
think you should say he has unfortunate 
weaknesses." 

What most of all convinced me, however, 
that the wishy-washy young man with the 
pea -green complexion must be playing some 
stealthy game, was the demeanour and mental 
attitude of Mr. Htgginson, his courier. After 
the first clay, Higginson appeared to be 
politeness and deference itself to us. He 
behaved to us both, almost as if we belonged 
to the titled classes. He treated us with the 
second best of his twenty-seven graduated 
manners. He fetched and carried for us 
with a courtly grace which recalled that dis- 
tinguished diplomat, the Comte de Laroche- 





by 



Gc 



Ic 



"nothing seemed to put the man down," 

sur-Loiret, at the station at Malines 
*& with l^ady Georgina. It is true, 
at his politest moments, 1 often 
caught the under - current of a wicked 
twinkle in his eye, and felt sure he was 
doing it all with some profound motive. 
But his external demeanour was everything 
that one could desire from a well-trained 
man servant ; I could hardly believe it was 
the same man who had growled to me at 
Florence, 4 * I shall be even with you yet/' as 
he left our office- 

*' Do you know, Brownie," Elsie mused 
once, i: I really begin to think we must have 
Original from 
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399 



misjudged Higgtnson. He's so extremely 
polite. Perhaps, after all, he is really a 
count, who has been exiled and impoverished 
for his political opinions." 

I smiled and held my tongue. Silence 
costs nothing, But Mr. Higginson's political 
opinions, I felt sure, were of that simple 
communistic sort which the law in its blunt 
way calls fraudulent They consisted in a 
belief that all was his which he could lay his 
hands on. 

M Higginson's a splendid fellah for his 
place, yah know, Miss Cay ley," Lord South- 
minster said to me one evening as we were 
approaching Aden. " What I like about him 
is, he's so doosid intelligent." 

" Extremely so/ 1 I answered. Then the 
devil entered into me again, "He had the 
doosid intelligence even to take in Lady 
Ceorgina." 

u Yaas ; that's just it, don't you know. 
Georgey told me that story. Screamingly 
funny, wasn't it? And I said to myself at 
once, ' Higginson's the man for me. I want 
a courier with jolly lots of brains and 
no blooming scruples, I'll entice this 
chap away from Marmy/ And I did. I 
outbid Marmy. Oh, yaas, he's a first-rate 
fellah, Higginson. What /want is a man 
who will do what he's told, and ask no 
beastly unpleasant questions. Higginson's 
that man. He's as sharp as a ferret." 

"And as dishonest as they make them. ,J 

He opened his hands with a gesture of 
unconcern. fi All the bettah for my purpose. 



See how frank I am, Miss Cayley. I tell the 
truth. The truth is very rare* Vou ought 
to respect me for it" 

"It depends somewhat upon the kind of 
truth/ 1 l answered, with a random shot. "1 
don't respect a man, for instance, for confess- 
ing to a forgery." 

He winced. Not for months after did I 
know how a stone thrown at a venture had 
chanced to hit the spot, and had vastly en- 
hanced his opinion of my cleverness. 

" You have heard about Dr. Fortescue- 
Langley too, I suppose ? " I went on. 

" Oh, yaas. Wasn't it real jam ? He did 
the doctor-trick on a lady in Switzerland. 
And the way he has come it ovah deah simple 
old Marmy ! He played Marmy with Ezekiel! 
Not so dusty t was it ? He's too lovely for 
anything ! " 

" He's an edged tool," I said. 

" Yaas ; that's why I use htm." 

u And edged tools may cut the user's 
fingers," 

"Not mine," he answered, taking out a 
cigarette, (i Oh, deah, no. He can't turn 
against me. He wouldn't dare to. Yah see, 
I have the fellah entirely in my powah. I 
know all his little games, and I can expose 
him any day. But it suits me to keep him + 
I don't mind telling yah, since I respect your 
intellect, that he and I are engaged in pulling 
off a big coup togethah. If it were not for 
that, I wouldn't be heah. Yah don't catch 
me going away so fah from Newmarket and 
the Empire for nothing." 




' VAH DON'T CATCH HE CQINfc £U FAK F ROM -J<BW MARKET, 

uri gin i\ from 



by ^OOgie 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



400 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



" I judged as much," I answered. And 
then I was silent 

But I wondered to myself why the neutral- 
tinted young man should be so communica- 
tive to an obviously hostile stranger. 

For the next few days it amused me to 
see how hard our lordling tried to suit his 
conversation to myself and Elsie. He was 
absurdly anxious to humour us. Just at first, 
it is true, he had discussed the subjects that 
lay nearest to his own heart He was an 
ardent votary- of the noble quadruped : and 
he loved the turf — whose sward, we judged, 
he trod mainly at TattersalFs. He spoke to 
us with erudition on " two-year-old form," 
and gave us several " safe things " for 
the spring handicaps. The Oaks he con- 
sidered " a moral " for Clorinda. He also 
retailed certain choice anecdotes about 
ladies whose Christian names were chiefly 
Tottie and Flo, and whose honoured sur- 
names have escaped my memory. Most 
of them flourished, I recollect, at the 
Frivolity Music Hall. But when he learned 
that our interest in the noble quadruped was 
scarcely more than tepid, and that we had 
never even visited "the Friv.," as he affec- 
tionately called it, he did his best in turn to 
acquire our subjects. He had heard us talk 
about Florence, for example, and he gathered 
from our talk that we loved its art treasures. 
So he set himself to work to be studiously 
artistic. It was a beautiful study in human 
ineptitude. " Ah, yaas," he murmured, turn- 
ing up the pale blue eyes ecstatically towards 
the mast-head. " Chawming place, Florence ! 
I dote on the pickchahs. 1 know them all 
by heart I assuah yah, I've spent houahs 
and houahs feeding my soul in the galleries." 

" And what particular painter does your 
soul most feed upon ? "' I asked, bluntly, with 
a smile. 

The question staggered him. I could see 
him hunting through the vacant chambers of 
his brain for a Florentine painter. Then a 
faint light gleamed in the leaden eyes, and he 
fingered the straw-coloured moustache with 
tint nervous hand till he almost put a visible 
point upon it. " Ah, Raphael?" he said, 
tentatively, with an inquiring air, yet beaming 
at his success. " Don't you think so ? 
Splendid artist, Raphael !" 

44 And a very safe guess,'' I answered, 
leading him on. " You can't go far wrong 
in mentioning Raphael, can you? But after 
him?" 

He dived into the recesses of his memory 
again, peered about him for a minute or two, 
and brought back nothing. "I can't remem- 



by Google 



bah the othah fellahs' names," he went on ; 
" they're all so much alike : all in e/A\ don't 
yah know ; but I recollect at the time they 
impressed me awfully." 

" No doubt," I answered. 

He tried to look through me, and failed. 
Then he plunged like a noble sportsman that 
he was on a second fetch of memory. "Ah — 
and Michael Angelo," he went on, quite proud 
of his treasure-trove. " Sweet things, Michael 
Angelo's ! " 

"Very sweet," I admitted. " So simple ; 
so touching ; so tender ; so domestic ! " 

I thought Elsie would explode ; but she 
kept her countenance. The pea-green young 
man gazed at me uneasily. He had half an 
idea by this time that I was making game of 
him. 

However, he fished up a name once more, 
and clutched at it "Savonarola, too," he 
adventured. " I adore Savonarola. His 
pickchahs are beautiful." 

" And so rare ! " Elsie murmured. 

" Then there is Fra Diavolo ? " I suggested, 
going one better. " How do you like Fra 
Diavolo?" 

He seemed to have heard the name before, 
but still he hesitated. "Ah — what did he 
paint ? " he asked, with growing caution. 

I stuffed him valiantly. " Those charming 
angels, you know," I answered. " With the 
roses and the glories ! " 

" Oh, yaas ; 1 recollect All askew, aren't 
they ; like this ! I remem bah them very 

well. But " a doubt flitted across his 

brain, " wasn't his name Fra Angelico?" 

" His brother," I replied, casting truth to 
the winds. "They worked together, you 
must have heard. One did the saints ; the 
other did the opposite. Division of labour, 
don't you see ; Fra Angelico, Fra Diavolo." 

He fingered his cigarette with a dubious 
hand, and wriggled his eye-glass tighter. 

" Yaas, beautiful ; beautiful ! But " 

growing suspicious apace, " wasn't Fra 
Diavolo also a composah ? " 

" Of course," I assented. " In his off 
time, he composed. Those early Italians — 
so versatile, you see ; so versatile ! ? ' 

He had his doubts, but he suppressed 
them. 

" And Torricelli," I went on, with a side 
glance at Elsie, who was choking by this time. 
" And Chianti, and Frittura, and Cinquevalli, 
and Giulio Romano." 

His distrust increased. " Xow you're 
tiying to make me commit myself," he 
drawled out " I remembah Torricelli — he's 
the fellah who used to paint all his women 

Original from 
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MISS CAYLEY* S ADVENTURES, 



401 




WASN'T K'KA 1)1 A YOLO ALSO A COMPOS AH ': 



crooked. But Chianti's a wine ; I've often 
drunk it ; and Romano's — well, every fellah 
knows Romano's is a restaurant near the 
Gaiety Theatre." 

" Besides/' I continued, in a drawl like his 
own, " there are Risotto, and Gnocchi, and 
Vermicelli, and Anchovy — all famous paintahs, 
and all of whom I don't doubt you admiah." 

Elsie exploded at last. But he took no 
offence. He smiled inanely, as if he rather 
enjoyed it M Look heah, you know," he said, 
with his crafty smile ; " that's one too much. 
I'm not taking any. You think yourselves 
very clevah for kidding me with paintahs 
who are really macaroni and cheese and 
claret \ yet if I were to tell you the Lejah 
was run at Ascot, or the Cesarewitch at 
Doncastah, why, you'd be no wisah* When 
it comes to art, I don't have a look in : but 
I could tell you a thing or two about starting 
prices. : ' 

And I was forced to admit that there he 
had reason. 

Still, I think he realized that he had better 
avoid the subject of art in future, as we 
avoided the noble quadruped He saw his 
limitations. 

Not till the last evening before we reached 
Bombay did I really understand the nature of 
my neighbour's project That evening, as it 
chanced, Elsie had a headache and went 
below early. I stopped with her till she 
dozed off; then I slipped up on deck once 
more for a breath of fresh air, before retiring 
for the night to the hot and stuffy cabins. 
It was an exquisite evening. The moon rode 
in the pale green sky of the tropics. A strange 



Vol 



-fit, 



light still lingered on the western horizon. 
The stifling heat of the Red Sea had given 
way long since to the refreshing coolness of 
the Indian Ocean* 1 strolled awhile on the 
quarter-deck, and sat down at last near the 
stern. Next moment, I was aware of some- 
body creeping up to me. 

" Look heah, Miss Cayley," a voice broke 
in ; "I'm in luck at last ! Pve been waiting, 
oh, evah so long, for this opportunity/' 

I turned and faced him* " Have you, 
indeed?" I answered. "Well, I have not, 
Lord Southminster." 

I tried to rise, but he motioned me back 
to my chair. There were ladies on deck, 
and to avoid being noticed I sank into my 
seat again. 

" I want to speak to you/ 3 he went on, in a 
voice that (for him) was almost impressive. 
" Haifa mo, Miss Cayley, I want to say— 
this last night — you misunderstand me," 

"On the contrary," I answered, "the 
trouble is— that I understand you perfectly." 

" No, yah dealt Look heath" He bent 
forward quite romantically. " I'm going to be 
perfectly frank. Of course yah know that 
when I came on board this ship I came — to 
checkmate yah." 

" Of course," I replied. " Why else should 
you and Higginson have bothered to come 
here?" 

He rubbed his hands together. "That's 
just it You're always clevah. You hit it 
first shot But there's wheah the point comes 
in. At first, I only thought of how we could 
circumvent yah. I treated yah as the enemy. 
Now, it's all the othah way. Miss Cayley, 

IVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



402 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE, 



you're the cleverest woman I evah met in this 
world \ you extort my admiration : " 

I could not repress a smile, I didn't 
know how It was, but I could see I possessed 
some mysterious attraction for the Asburst 
family. I was fatal to Ashursts. Lady 
Georgina, Harold Tillingtoii, the Honourable 
Mar mad tike, Lord Sou thm in ster— different 
types as they were, all succumbed without 
one blow to me. 

" You flatter me," I answered, coldly. 

" No, I don't," he cried, Hashing his cuffs, 
and gazing affectionately at his sleeve-links, 
"Ton my soul, I assuah yah, I mean it I 
can't tell you how much I admiah yah. I 
admiah your intellect Every day I have 
seen yah, I feel it moah and moah. Why, 
you're the only person who has evah out- 
flanked my fellah, Higginson. As a rule, I 
don't think much of women. IVe been 
through several 1 ,ondon seasons, and iots of 
J em have tried their level best to catch me ; 
the cleverest mammas have been aftah me for 
their Ethels. But I wasn't so easily caught : 
I dodged the Ethels. With you, it's different. 
I fee!" — he paused — " you're a woman a 
fellah might be really proud of* ,J 

"You are too kind," I answered, in my 
refrigerator voice. 

" Well, will you take me ? " he asked, trying 
to seize my hand, 
" Miss Cay ley, if 
you will, you will 
make me unspeak- 
ably happy*' 1 

It was a great 
effort— for him— 
and I was sorry 
to crush it. U I 
regret, 71 I said, 
" that I am com- 
pelled to deny 
you unspeakable 
happiness." 

14 Oh, but you 
don't catch on. 
You mistake. Let 
Tin; explain. You Ye 
backing the othah 
man. Now, I 
happen to know 
about that ; and I 
assuah you, it's an 
error. Take my 
word for it, you're 
staking your 
money on the 
wrong fellah." 

"I do not 



understand you," I replied, drawing away 
from his approach. " And what is more, I 
may add, you could never understand me*" 

"Yaas, but I do. I understand perfectly, 
I can see where you go wrong. You drew 
up Manny's will; and you think Manny has 
left all he's worth to Harold Tillingtoii ; so 
you're putting every penny you've got on 
Harold. Well, that's mere moonshine, 
Harold may think it's all right ; but it's not 
all right. There's many a slip 'twist the cup 
and the Probate Court Listen heah, Miss 
Cay ley : Higginson and I are a jolly sight 
sharpah than your friend Harold. Harold's 
what they call a clevah fellah in society, and 
Fin what they call a fool; but I know 
bettah than Harold which side of my bread's 
buttahed." 

" I don't doubt it," I answered. 

lt Well, I have managed this business. I 
don't mind telling you now, I had a telegram 
from Marmy's valet when we touched at 
Aden : and poor old Marmy's sinking* 
Habakkuk's been too much for him. Six- 
teen stone going under. Why am I not with 
him ? yah may ask. Because, when a man 
of Marmy's temperament is dying, it T s safah 
to be away from him. There's plenty of 
time for Mar my to altah his will yet— and 
there are othah contingencies, Still, Harold's 







"TAKE ,MV WUKU K0« IT 3 YOU'RE STAKJNG YoVR MUKtV US THE 

YERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



WJtOtfti FELLAH, 



MISS CAYLEY'S ADVENTURES. 



403 



quite out of it. You take my word for it : if 
you back Harold, you back a man who's not 
going to get anything ; while if you back me, 
you back the winnah, with a coronet into the 
bargain." And he smiled fatuously. 

I looked at him with a look that would 
have made a wiser man wince. But it fell 
flat on Lord Southminster. " Do you know 
why I do not rise and go down to my cabin 
at once ? " I said, slowly. " Because, if I 
did, somebody as I passed might see my 
burning cheeks — cheeks flushed with shame 
at your insulting proposal — and might 
guess that you had asked me, and that 
I had refused you. And I should shrink 
from the disgrace of anyone's knowing 
that you had put such a humiliation upon 
me. You have been frank with me — 
after your kind, Lord Southminster; frank 
with the frankness of a low and purely com- 
mercial nature. I will be frank with you in 
turn. You are right in supposing that I love 
Harold Tillington — a man whose name I 
hate to mention in your presence. But you 
are wrong in supposing that the disposition of 
Mr. Marmaduke Ashurst's money has or can 
have anything to do with the feelings I enter- 
tain towards him. I would marry him all the 
sooner if he were poor and penniless. You 
cannot understand that state of mind, of 
course : but you must be content to accept 
it. And I would not marry you if there 
were no other man left in the world to marry. 
I should as soon think of marrying a lump 
of dough." I faced him, all crimson. " Is 
that plain enough ? Do you see now that I 
really mean it ? " 

He gazed at me with a curious look, and 
twirled what he considered his moustache 
once more, quite airily. The man was 
imperturbable — a pachydermatous imbecile. 
" You're all wrong, yah know," he said, after 
a long pause, during which he had regarded 
me through his eye-glass as if I were a 
specimen of some rare new species. " You're 
all wrong, and yah won't believe me. But I 
tell yah, I know what I'm talking about. 
You think it's quite safe about Marmy's 
money — that he's left it to Harold, because 
you drew the will up. I assuah you that 
will's not worth the paper it's written on. 
You fancy Harold's a hot favourite : he's a 



rank outsidah. I give you a chance, and 
you won't take it. I want yah because you're 
a remarkable woman. Most of the Ethels 
cry when they're trying to make a fellah 
propose to 'em ; and I don't like 'em damp : 
but you have some go about yah. You insist 
upon backing the wrong man. But you'll 
find your mistake out yet." A bright idea 
struck him. " I say — why don't you hedge ? 
Leave it open till Marmy's gone, and then 
marry the winnah ? " 

It was hopeless trying to make this clod 
understand. His brain was not built with 
the right cells for understanding me. " Lord 
Southminster," I said, turning upon him, 
and clasping my hands, " I will not go away 
while you stop here. But you have some 
spark enough of a gentleman in your com- 
position, I hope, not to inflict your company 
any longer upon a woman who does not 
desire it. I ask you to leave me here alone. 
When you have gone, and I have had time 
to recover from your degrading offer, I may, 
perhaps, feel able to go down to my cabin." 

He stared at me with open blue eyes — 
those watery blue eyes. "Oh, just as you 
like," he answered. " I wanted to do you a 
good turn, because you're the only woman I 
evah really admiahed — to say admiah, don't 
you know; not trotted round like the Ethels : 
but you won't allow me. I'll go if you wish 
it ; though I tell you again, you're backing 
the wrong man, and soonah or latah you'll 
discover it. L don't mind laying you six to 
four against him. Howevah, I'll do one 
thing for yah : I'll leave this offah always 
open. I'm not likely to marry any othah 
woman — not good enough, is it? — and if 
evah you find out you're mistaken about 
Harold Tillington, remembah, honour bright, 
I shall be ready at any time to renew my 
offah." 

By this time, I was at boiling point. I 
could not find words to answer him. I waved 
him away angrily with one hand. He raised 
his hat with quite a jaunty air and strolled off 
forward, puffing his cigarette. I don't think 
he even knew the disgust with which he 
inspired me. 

I sat some hours with the cool air playing 
about my burning cheeks before I mustered 
up courage to rise and go down below again. 



by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



A nimal Actualities. 



NOTE. — Under this title we intend frttiting a series of perfectly authentic anecdotes of animal life, 
illustrated by Mr, J \ A, Skfphfrd t an artisl long a favourite with readers of The STRAND Magazine* 
We shall be glad l& receive similar anecdotes, fully authenticated by names of witnesses , for use in future 
numbers. Whik the stories themselves will be matters of fa/t t it must he understood that t/u* artist will 
treat the subject with freedom and fancy y mor* with a view to an amusing commentary than to a mere 
representation of the occurrence. 

IV. 




/"\ 



T)cv 



^^ 



■»"^l A 



O^v 




glSPLACEI) attachments among 
I animals would seem to be some- 
| what less rare than one might 
J expect. I-ast month we had an 
odd rase of tove at first sight, 
on the part of a very fat and motherly old 




being a toad, A goose and a barn-door 
fowl are at least both birds, while the 
toad and the turtle-dove are of different 
classes in the animal kingdom. More, it 
was the turtle-dove who was enamoured 
— the beautiful turtle-dove, type of felicity 




1 EN rh'k THE li]G TOADi 



goose, for a ham-door cock. Now we have 
a quainter thing still --the love-making of 
a turtle-dove, the object of its affections 



in affection; and it was the toad — the 
dank, uglv* despised toad — who rejected 
its proffered lov& tnairn 

L, IVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



MISS CAYLEY'S ADVENTURES. 



395 



leant over the taffrail, gazing down with 
open mouth and vacant stare at the water, I 
took a goed long look at him. He interested 
me much — because he was so exceptionally 
uninteresting; a pallid, anaemic, indefinite 
hobbledehoy, with a high, narrow forehead, 
and sketchy features. He had watery, restless 
eyes of an insipid light blue ; thin, yellow 
hair, almost white in its paleness ; and twitch- 
ing hands that played nervously all the time 
with a shadowy moustache. This shadowy 
moustache seemed to absorb as a rule the 
best part of his attention ; it was so sparse 
and so blanched that he felt it continually — to 
assure himself, no doubt, of the reality of its 
existence. I need hardly add that he wore 
an eye-glass. 

He was an aristocrat, I felt sure; Eton 
and Christ Church : no ordinary person 
could have been quite so flavourless. Imbe- 
cility like his is only to be attained as the 
result of long and judicious selection. 

He went on gazing in a vacant way at the 
water below, an ineffectual patrician smile 
playing feebly round the corners of his mouth 
meanwhile. Then he turned and stared at 
me as I lay back in my deck-chair. For a 
minute he looked me over as if I were a 
horse for sale. When he had finished 
inspecting me, he beckoned to somebody at 
the far end of the quarter-deck. 

The somebody sidled up with a deferential 
air which confirmed my belief in the pea- 
green young man's aristocratic origin. It 
was such deference as the British flunkey 
pays only to blue blood ; for he has grada- 
tions of flunkeydom. He is respectful to 
wealth ; polite to acquired rank ; but servile 
only to hereditary nobility. Indeed, you can 
make a rough guess at the social status of the 
person he addresses by observing which one 
of his twenty-seven nicely graduated manners 
he adopts in addressing him. 

The pea-green young man glanced over in 
my direction, and murmured something to 
the satellite, whose back was turned towards 
me. I felt sure, from his attitude, he was 
asking whether I was the person he suspected 
me to be. The satellite nodded assent, 
whereat the pea-green young man, screwing 
up his face to fix his eye-glass, stared harder 
than ever. He must be heir to a peerage, I 
felt convinced; nobody short of that rank 
would consider himself entitled to stare 
with such frank unconcern at an unknown 
lady. 

Presently it further occurred to me that 
the satellite's back seemed strangely familiar. 
"I have seen that man somewhere, Elsie," I 



by Google 



whispered, putting aside the wisps of hair 
that blew about my face. 

" So have I, dear," Elsie answered, with a 
slight shudder. And I was instinctively 
aware that I too disliked him. 

As Elsie spoke, the man turned, and 
strolled slowly past us, with that ineffable 
insolence which is the other side of the 
flunkey's insufferable self-abasement. He 
Tast a glance at us as he went by, a withering 
glance of brazen effrontery. We knew him 
now, of course : it was that variable star, our 
old acquaintance, Mr. Higginson the courier. 

He was here as himself this time ; no 
longer the count or the mysterious faith- 
healer. The diplomat hid his rays under the 
garb of the man-servant. 

" Depend upon it, Elsie," I cried, clutching 
her arm with a vague sense of fear, "this 
man means mischief. There is danger 
ahead. When a creature of Higginson's sort, 
who has risen to be a count and a fashionable 
physician, descends again to be a courier, you 
may rest assured it is because he has some- 
thing to gain by it. He has some deep 
scheme afloat. And we are part of it." 

" His master looks weak enough and silly 
enough for anything," Elsie answered, eyeing 
the suspected lordling. " I should think he 
is just the sort of man such a wily rogue 
would naturally fasten upon." 

" When a wily rogue gets hold of a weak 
fool, who is also dishonest," I said, " the two 
together may make a formidable combination. 
But never mind. We're forewarned. I think 
I shall be even with him." 

That evening, at dinner in the saloon, the 
pea-green young man strolled in with a 
jaunty air and took his seat next to us. The 
Red Sea, by the way, was kinder than the 
Mediterranean : it allowed us to dine from 
the very first evening. Cards had been laid 
on the plates to mark our places. I glanced 
at my neighbour's. It bore the inscription, 
" Viscount Southminster." 

That was the name of Lord Kynaston's 
eldest son — Lady Georgina's nephew ; Harold 
Tillington's cousin ! So this was the man 
who might possibly inherit Mr. Marmaduke 
Ashurst's money ! I remembered now how 
often and how fervently Lady Georgina had 
said, " Kynaston's sons are all fools." If the 
rest came up to sample, I was inclined to 
agree with her. 

It also flashed across me that Lord 
Southminster might have heard through 
Higginson of our meeting with Mr. Marma- 
duke Ashurst at Florence, and of my 
acquaintance with Harold Tillington at 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



39 6 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



Schlangenbad and Lungern* With a woman's 
instinct, I jumped at the fact that the pea- 
green young man had taken passage by this 
boat, on purpose to baffle both me and 
Harold. 

Thinking it over, it seemed to me, too, 
that he might have various possible points of 
view on the matter. He might desire, for 
example, that Harold should marry me, 
under the impression that his marriage with 
a penniless outsider would annoy his uncle \ 
for the pea-green young man doubtless 
thought that 1 was still to Mr, Ashurst just 
that dreadful adventuress, If so, his obvious 
cue would be to promote a good under- 
standing between Harold and myself, in 
order to make us marry, so that the urbane 
old gentleman might then disinherit his 
favourite nephew, and make a new will in 
Lord South minster's interest. Or again, the 
pea-green young man might, on the contrary, 
be aware that Mr. 
Ashurst and 1 had 
got on admirably 
together when we 
met at Florence ; 
in which case his 
aim would naturally 
be to find out some- 
thing that might set 
the rich uncle 
against me. Yet 
once more, he 
might merely have 
heard that I had 
drawn up Uncle 
Marmaduke's will 
at the office, and 



(amongst other things) in a dinner jacket and 
a white tie ; for myself, I detest such fopperies 
on board ship ; they seem to me out of place : 
they conflict with the infinite possibilities of 
the situation. One stands too near the 
realities of things. Evening dress and 
mai-de-mer sort ill together. 

As my neighbour sat down, he turned to 
me with an inane smile which occupied all 
his face. * l Good evening/' he said, in a 
baronial drawl. " Miss Cay ley, I gathah ? 
I asked the skippah's leave to set next yah. 
We ought to be friends — rathah. I think 
yah know my poor deah old aunt, Lady 
Georgina Fawley*' s 

I bowed a somewhat freezing bow. u I^ady 
Georgina is one of my dearest friends/' I 
answered. 

"No, really? Poor deah old Georgey ! 
(Jot somebody to stick up for her at last, has 
she ? Now, that's what I call chivalrous of 



M. 




"HE TUfctfEt TO M£ WITH AN" INAMT: SmILF, 




M ^\£S^ 



he might desire to 

worm the contents of it out of me. Which- 
ever was his design, I resolved to be upon my 
guard in every word I said to him, and leave 
no door open to any trickery either way. 
For of one thing I felt sure, that the colour- 
less young man had torn himself away from 
the mudhoney of Piccadilly for this voyage 
to India only because he had heard there 
was a chance of meeting me. 

That was a politic move> whoever planned 
it — himself or Higginson; for a week on 
board ship with a person or persons is the 
very best chance of getting thrown in with 
them ; whether they like it or lump it, they 
can't easily avoid you. 

It was while I was pondering these things 
in my mind, and resolving with myself not to 
give myself away, that the young man with 
the pea-green face lounged in and dropped 
into the next seat to me. He was dressed 



by Google 



yah. Magnanimous, isn't it? I like to see 
people stick up for their friends, And it 
must be a novelty for Georgey, For between 
you and me, a moah cantankerous, spiteful, 
acidulated old cough-drop than the poor deah 
soul it *ud be difficult to hit upon*" 

(< Lady Georgina has brains," I answered ; 
" and they enable her to recognise a fool 
when she sees him. I will admit that she 
does not suffer fools gladly." 

He turned to me with a sudden, sharp 
look in the depths of the lack-lustre eyes- 
Already it began to strike me that, though 
the pea -green young man was inane, he had 
his due proportion of a curtain insidious 
practical cunning, '* That's true/' he 
answered, measuring me, "And according 
to her, almost everybody's a fool — especially 
her relations, There's a fine knack of 
Sweeping generalization about deah skinny 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



MISS CAYLEY'S ADVENTURES. 



397 



old Georgey. The few people she reahlly 
likes are all archangels ; the rest are blither- 
ing idiots ; there's no middle course with 
her." 

I held my peace frigidly. 

"She thinks me a very special and 
peculiah fool," he went on, crumbling his 
bread. 

" Lady Georgina," I answered, " is a 
person of exceptional discrimination. I 
would almost always accept her judgment 
on anyone as practically final." 

He laid down his soup-spoon, fondled the 
imperceptible moustache with his tapering 
fingers, and then broke once more into a 
cheerful expanse of smile which reminded me 
of nothing so much as of the village idiot. 
It spread over his face as the splash from a 
stone spreads over a mill-pond. " Now that's 
a nice cheerful sort of thing to say to a 
fellah," he ejaculated, fixing his eye-glass in 
his eye, with a few fierce contortions of his 
facial muscles. "That's encouraging, don't 
yah know, as the foundation of an acquaint- 
ance. Makes a good cornah-stone. Calcu- 
lated to place things at once upon what yah 
call a friendly basis. Georgey said you had 
a pretty wit ; I see now why she admiahed 
it. Birds of a feathah : very wise old pro- 
verbs 

I reflected that, after all, this young man 
had nothing overt against him, beyond a fishy 
blue eye and an inane expression ; so, feeling 
that I had, perhaps, gone a little too far, I 
continued, after a minute, " And your uncle, 
how is he ? " 

"Marmy?" he inquired, with another 
elephantine smile ; and then I perceived it 
was a form of humour with him (or rather, a 
cheap substitute) to speak of his elder relations 
by their abbreviated Christian names, with- 
out any prefix. " Marmy's doing very well, 
thank yah ; as well as could be expected. 
In fact, bettah. Habakkuk on the brain : it's 
carrying him off at last. He has Bright's 
disease very bad — drank port, don't yah 
know — and won't trouble this wicked world 
much longah with his presence. It will be a 
happy release — especially for his nephews." 

I was really grieved, for I had grown to 
like the urbane old gentleman, as I had grown 
to like the cantankerous old lady. In spite 
of his fussiness and his Stock Exchange views 
on the interpretation of Scripture, his genuine 
kindliness and his real liking for me had 
softened my heart to him ; and my face must 
have shown my distress, for the pea-green 
young man added quickly with an after- 
thought : " But you needn't be afraid, yah 



know. It's all right for Harold Tillington. 
You ought to know that as well as anyone — and 
bettah : for it was you who drew up his will 
for him at Florence." 

I flushed crimson, I believe. Then he 
knew all about me ! "I was not asking on 
Mr. Tillington's account," I answered. " I 
asked because I have a personal feeling of 
friendship for your uncle, Mr. Ashurst." 

His hand strayed up to the straggling 
yellow hairs on his upper lip once more, and 
he smiled again, this time with a curious 
under-current of foolish craftiness. " That's 
a good one," he answered. " Georgey told 
me you were original. Marmy's a millionaire, 
and many people love millionaires for their 
money. But to love Marmy for himself — I 
do call that originality ! Why, weight for 
age, he's acknowledged to be the most por- 
tentous old boah in London society ! " 

"I like Mr. Ashurst because he has a 
kind heart and some genuine instincts," I 
answered. " He has not allowed all human 
feeling to be replaced by a cheap mask of 
Pall Mall cynicism." 

" Oh, I say ; how's that for preaching ? 
Don't you manage to give it hot to a fellah, 
neithah ! And at sight, too, without the 
usual three days of grace. Have some of 
my champagne? I'm a forgiving creechah." 

" No, thank you. I prefer this hock." 

" Your friend, then ? " And he motioned 
the steward to pass the bottle. 

To my great disgust, Elsie held out her 
glass. I was annoyed at that. It showed 
she had missed the drift of our conversa- 
tion, and was therefore lacking in feminine 
intuition. I should be sorry if I had allowed 
the higher mathematics to kill out in me the 
most distinctively womanly faculty. 

From that first day forth, however, in spite 
of this beginning, Lord Southminster almost 
persecuted me with his persistent attentions. 
He did all a fellah could possibly do to 
please me. I could not make out precisely 
what he was driving at ; but I saw he had 
some artful game of his own to play, and 
that he was playing it subtly. I also saw 
that, vapid as he was, his vapidity did 
not prevent him from being worldly wise 
with the wisdom of the self-seeking man 
of the world, who utterly distrusts and 
disbelieves in all the higher emotions of 
humanity. He harped so often on this string 
that on our second day out, as we lolled 
on deck in the heat, I had to rebuke him 
sharply. He had been sneering for some 
hours. "There are two kinds of silly sim- 
plicity, Ix>rd Southminster," I said, at last. 



by L^OOgle 



■--■I I '-| 1 1 I '.1 I \\s 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



398 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE, 



"One kind is the silly simplicity of the rustic 
who trusts everybody ; the other kind is the 
silly simplicity of the Pall Mall clubman who 
trusts nobody. It is just as foolish and just 
as one-sided to overlook the good as to over- 
look the evil in humanity. If you trust 
everyone, you are likely to be taken in ; but 
if you trust no one, you put yourself at a 
serious practical disadvantages besides losing 
half the joy of living.'' 

li Then you think me a fool, like Georgey? " 
he broke out. 

14 I should never be rude enough to say 
so," I answered, fanning myself. 

"Well, you're what I call a first-rate com- 
panion for a voyage down the Red Sea," he 
put in, gazing abstractedly at the awnings. 
11 Such a lovely freezing mixture ! A fellah 
doesn't need ices when yoiire on tap* I 
recommend you as a refrigeratah." 

"I am glad/' I answered, demurely, IA if 
I have secured your approbation in that 
humble capacity. I'm sure I 
have tried hard for it" 

Yet nothing that I could say 
seemed to put the man down. 
In spite of rebuffs, he was 
assiduous in running down the 
companion-ladder for my 
parasol or my smelling-bottle ; 
he fetched me chairs ; he stayed 
me with cushions ; he offered 
to lend me books ; he pestered 
me to drink his wine; and he 
kept Elsie in champagne, which 
she annoyed me by accepting. 
Poor dear Elsie clearly failed 
to understand the creature. 
i£ Hes so kind and polite, 
Brownie, isn't he?" she would 
observe, in her simple fashion. 
41 Do you know, I think he's 
taken quite a fancy to you ! 
And he'll be an earl by-and-by, 
I call it romantic. How lovely 
it would seem, dear, to see you 
a countess/ 1 

" Elsie," I said, severely, with 
one hand on her arm, '* you are a dear little 
soul, and I am very fond of you ; hut if 
you think I could yell myself for a coronet 
to a pasty faced young man with a pea- 
green complexion and glassy blue eyes— I 
can only say, my child, you have misread 
my character, He isn't a man : he's a lump 
of putty ! " 

I think Elsie was quite shocked that I 
should apply these terms to a courtesy 
lord, the eldest son of a peer Nature had 



endowed her with the profound British 
belief that peers should be spoken of in 
choice and peculiar language. "If a peer's 
a fool," Lady Georgina said once to me, 
" people think you should say bis tempera- 
ment does not fit him for the conduct of 
affairs : if he's a roue or a drunkard, they 
think you should say he has unfortunate 
weaknesses." 

What most of all convinced me, however, 
that the wishy-washy young man with the 
pea -green complexion must be playing some 
stealthy game, was the demeanour and mental 
attitude of Mr. Higginson, his courier. After 
the first day, Higginson appeared to be 
politeness and deference itself to us. He 
behaved to us both, almost as if we belonged 
to the titled classes. He treated us with the 
second best of his twenty-seven graduated 
manners- He fetched and carried for us 
with a courtly grace which recalled that dis- 
tinguished diplomat* the Comte de Laroche- 





by LiC 



IC 



" N'QTHING FLEEMED TO PUT TIFF MAN DOWN. 

sur-hoiret, at the station at Malines 
with Lady Georgma. It is true, 
at his politest moments, I often 
caught the under ~ current of a wicked 
twinkle in his eye, and felt sure he was 
doing it all with some profound motive. 
But his external demeanour was everything 
that one could desire from a well-trained 
manservant ; I could hardly believe it was 
the same man who had growled to me at 
Florence, " I shall be even with you yet," as 
he left our office. 

u Do you know, Brownie/' Elsie mused 
once, s ' I really begin to think we must have 

Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



MYSTERIES OF SOUND. 



409 




Fnrtn a} 



INSTRUMENTS FOR TESTING SOUNDS. 



1 1 'Aotoprnph, 



hours in the loftiest chamber of the building 
watching the readings of an instrument, 
while a colleague watched a similar instru- 
ment in the .crypt 400ft. below. It was while 
occupying this elevated position, with atten- 
tion well braced, and in that night silence 
which falls even over our great Metropolis, 
that 1 learned how remarkably certain sounds 
can be recorded over vast distances. The 
measured tramp of the policeman rang as 
sharp or sharper than if I had been on 
the pavement beside him. The fog-horn 
of the bicycle — then in vogue— could be 
heard streets away, and railway whistles 
on distant lines and hooters on the ship- 
ping far down the river seemed unearthly 
in their carrying power and clearness, 

The experiences of that night were further 
confirmed on yet another occasion when, 
about the same period, I chanced to make 
my first balloon voyage, and when, by rare 
fortune, our balloon drifted over the very 
heart of London and almost directly over 
Sl Paul's Cathedral, at an elevation of 
3,000ft. above its golden cross. It was a 
noteworthy voyage, and deeply impressed 
upon my mind afterwards by the fact that 
it was one of the last conducted by the late 
Captain Dale, who shortly afterwards lost his 
life while ascending from the Crystal Palace 
grounds. It was while we were maintaining a 
high elevation that we made out Kennington 



by Google 



Oval immediately below us, and we could 
actually watch a game of cricket in progress. 
Soon, however, it became apparent that play 
was suspended, and then, manifestly in our 
honour, a ringing cheer came up with a dis- 
tinctness that I was wholly unprepared for. 
I learned, then, that an English cheer is a 
very arousing, and may become a very 
astonishing, sound; but my wonder grew as 
we swept on and presently caught the 
gathering rattle of the streets below, which 
soon increased and &{rew to a deafening roar 
positively painful by its harshness and 
intensity. 

So far, these experiences were but proofs 
of the great carrying power aloft of loud and 
familiar natural noises, but I was now to be 
impressed quite equally with the penetration 
into upper air of Nature's softer music. It 
was squally weather that day, and, as evening 
approached^ the wind grew rough with gather- 
ing storm. We were at that time scudding 
fast over Hertfordshire, where the country 
was well timbered, and ever as we passed 
high over woods, then in full foliage, a soft 
murmur would fill our ears, and it seemed 
almost incredible that this was but the tossing 
trees singing to us half a mile below, There 
were other sounds, of course. Anon would 
come the bark of a clog from— where? Or 
the whistle of a train scarcely yet visible in 
the distance deep down* 

Original from 

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400 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



" I judged as much/' I answered. And 
then I was silent 

But I wondered to myself why the neutral- 
tinted young man should be so communica- 
tive to an obviously hostile stranger. 

For the next few days it amused me to 
see how hard our lordling tried to suit his 
conversation to myself and Elsie. He was 
absurdly anxious to humour us. Just at first, 
it is true, he had discussed the subjects that 
lay nearest to his own heart He was an 
ardent votary of the noble quadruped : and 
he loved the turf — whose sward, we judged, 
he trod mainly at Tattersall's. He spoke to 
us with erudition on " two-year-old form," 
and gave us several "safe things" for 
the spring handicaps. The Oaks he con- 
sidered " a moral " for Clorinda. He also 
retailed certain choice anecdotes about 
ladies whose Christian names were chiefly 
Tottie and Flo, and whose honoured sur- 
names have escaped my memory. Most 
of them flourished, I recollect, at the 
Frivolity Music Hall. But when he learned 
that our interest in the noble quadruped was 
scarcely more than tepid, and that we had 
never even visited "the Friv.," as he affec- 
tionately called it, he did his best in turn to 
acquire our subjects. He had heard us talk 
about Florence, for example, and he gathered 
from our talk that we loved its art treasures. 
So he set himself to work to be studiously 
artistic. It was a beautiful study in human 
ineptitude. " Ah, yaas," he murmured, turn- 
ing up the pale blue eyes ecstatically towards 
the mast-head. " Chawming place, Florence ! 
I dote on the pickchahs. 1 know them all 
by heart. I assuah yah, I've spent houahs 
and houahs feeding my soul in the galleries." 

" And what particular painter does your 
soul most feed upon ? " I asked, bluntly, with 
a smile. 

The question staggered him. I could see 
him hunting through the vacant chambers of 
his brain for a Florentine painter. Then a 
faint light gleamed in the leaden eyes, and he 
fingered the straw-coloured moustache with 
thnt nervous hand till he almost put a visible 
point upon it. "Ah, Raphael?" he said, 
tentatively, with an inquiring air, yet beaming 
at his success. " Don't you think so ? 
Splendid artist, Raphael !" 

" And a very safe guess," I answered, 
leading him on. "You can't go far wrong 
in mentioning Raphael, can you? But after 
him?" 

He dived into the recesses of his memory 
again, peered about him for a minute or two, 
and brought back nothing. "I can't remem- 



by Google 



bah the othah fellahs' names," he went on ; 
" they're all so much alike : all in e/A\ don't 
yah know ; but I recollect at the time they 
impressed me awfully." 

" No doubt," I answered. 

He tried to look through me, and failed. 
Then he plunged like a noble sportsman that 
he was on a second fetch of memory. "Ah — 
and Michael Angeto," be went on, quite proud 
of his treasure-trove. " Sweet things, Michael 
Angelo's ! " 

"Very sweet," I admitted. " So simple ; 
so touching ; so tender ; so domestic ! " 

I thought Elsie would explode ; but she 
kept her countenance. The pea-green young 
man gazed at me uneasily. He had half an 
idea by this time that I was making game of 
him. 

However, he fished up a name once more, 
and clutched at it. "Savonarola, too," he 
adventured. "I adore Savonarola. His 
pickchahs are beautiful." 

"And so rare .!" Elsie murmured. 

" Then there is Fra Diavolo ? " I suggested, 
going one better. "How do you like Fra 
Diavolo?" 

He seemed to have heard the name before, 
but still he hesitated. "Ah — what did he 
paint?" he asked, with growing caution. 

I stuffed him valiantly. " Those charming 
angels, you know," I answered. "With the 
roses and the glories ! " 

" Oh, yaas ; 1 recollect. All askew, aren't 
they ; like this ! I remembah them very 

well. But " a doubt flitted across his 

brain, " wasn't his name Fra Angelico ? " 

" His brother," I replied, casting truth to 
the winds. "They worked together, you 
must have heard. One did the saints ; the 
other did the opposite. Division of labour, 
don't you see ; Fra Angelico, Fra Diavolo." 

He fingered his cigarette with a dubious 
hand, and wriggled his eye-glass tighter. 

" Yaas, beautiful ; beautiful ! But " 

growing suspicious apace, " wasn't Fra 
Diavolo also a composah ? " 

" Of course," I assented. " In his off 
time, he composed. Those early Italians — 
so versatile, you see ; so versatile ! " 

He had his doubts, but he suppressed 
them. 

" And Torricelli," I went on, with a side 
glance at Elsie, who was choking by this time. 
" And Chianti, and Frittura, and Cinquevalli, 
and Ciiulio Romano." 

His distrust increased. " Now you're 
tiying to make me commit myself," he 
drawled out. " I remembah Torricelli — he's 
the fellah who used to paint all his women 

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MISS CAYLEY'S ADVENTURES. 



401 




WAhS T KKA J?IAVQUO AUSO A COMPU5AK T 



crooked. But Chiangs a wine; Fve often 
drunk it ; and Romano's— well, every fellah 
knows Romano's is a restaurant near the 
Gaiety Theatre." 

** Besides/" I continued, in a drawl like his 
own, " there are Risotto, and Gnocchi, and 
Vermicelli, and Anchovy —all famous paintahs, 
and all of whom I don't doubt you admiah. 1 ' 

Elsie exploded at last. But he took no 
offence. He smiled inanely, as if he rather 
enjoyed it " Look heah, you know," he said, 
with his crafty smile ; " that's one too much. 
I'm not taking any. You think yourselves 
very clevah for kidding me with paintahs 
who are really macaroni and cheese and 
claret ; yet if I were to tell you the Lejah 
was run at Ascot, or the Cesarewitch at 
Doncastah, why, you'd be no wisah. When 
it comes to art, I don't have a look in : but 
I could tell you a thing or two about starting 
prices-" 

And 1 was forced to admit that there he 
had reason. 

Still, I think he realized that he had better 
avoid the subject of art in future, as we 
avoided the noble quadruped- He saw his 
limitations. 

Xot till the last evening before we reached 
Bombay did I really understand the nature of 
my neighbours project That evening, as it 
chanced, Elsie had a headache and went 
below early, I stopped with her till she 
dozed off; then I slipped up on deck once 
more for a breath of fresh air, before retiring 
for the night to the hot and stuffy cabins. 
It was an exquisite evening. The moon rode 



in the pale green %ky of the tro 



v*l 



@5dgte 



light still lingered on the western horizon. 
The stifling heat of the Red Sea had given 
way long since to the refreshing coolness of 
the Indian Ocean, I strolled awhile on the 
quarter-deck, and sat down at last near the 
stern. Next moment, I was aware of some- 
body creeping up to me. 

1( Look heah, Miss Cay ley," a voice broke 
in ; " I'm in luck at last I I've been waiting, 
oh, evah so long, for this opportunity, ?] 

I turned and faced him, *' Have you, 
indeed ? " I answered* " Well, I have not^ 
Lord Southminster." 

I tried to rise, but he motioned me back 
to my chair There were ladies on deck, 
and to avoid being noticed I sank into my 
seat again. 

" I want to speak to you," he went on, in a 
voice that (for him) was almost impressite. 
" Half a mo, Miss Cayley. I want to say— 
this last night — you misunderstand me/' 

M On the contrary," I answered, " the 
trouble is— that I understand you perfectly." 

" No, yah don't Look heah." He bent 
forward quite romantically. ** I'm going to be 
perfectly frank. Of course yah know that 
when I came on board this ship I came— to 
checkmate yah." 

" Of course,'* I replied. w Why else should 
you and Higginson have bothered to come 
here?" 

He rubbed his hand* together. "That's 
just it You're always clevah. Von hit it 
first shot But there's wh^ah the point comes 
in. At first, 1 only thought of how we couid 
circumvent yah. I traced vah as the enemy, 
\"ow f it's MrJouiakfEAnwav, Mi*-. Or. ley, 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



412 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



may be sounds of much penetration as 
interpreted by the hearing faculty of other 
creatures. A curious illustration of this fact 
is to be noticed near my own home in 
Berkshire. I have often gone out on my 
lawn just before nine o'clock on a still night, 
when the wind was either dead calm or else 
blowing softly from the south, and having 
accurate time, have listened with all my ears 
for the report of the evening gun at Ports- 
mouth, forty miles away, but neither myself 
nor any friends who have been with me have 
ever succeeded in catching even the slightest 
suspicion of the sound. Yet you may go to 
the neighbouring preserves, and, precisely 
after the hour, the pheasants will give a 
startled flutter. Unquestionably, the birds 
detect the sound that, too feeble to affect 
ourselves, yet conveys alarm to their more 
sensitive hearing. The same may also be 
said of other vibrations which are not 
feeble, but on the contrary intense and rapid 
— in fact, so rapid as to be just beyond 
the human auditory scale, Mr, F. Galton, 
the famous anthropologist, has invented a 
little whistle with an adjustable plug, by 
which it can be rendered more and more 
shrill until it ceases to give any true note 
at all to our ears ; yet a little dog may clearly 
hear it as a whistle still, and respond readily 




WHISTLE IKVBNTRD RY MK. F + G ALTON, WHICH A POG CAN 

Prom a] not a human heinc;, 

to its call The little instrument, in use, is 
here pictured. 

Many of the facts just mentioned were 
dealt with by the late Professor Tyndall in a 
memorable series of experiments carried on 
chiefly at South Foreland, The results of 
that inquiry fairly took the scientific world 
by surprise* It went to show that the 



by Oc 



IC 



behaviour of sound was not always the same* 
That on some occasions horns could be heard 
farther than guns ; on another occasion the 
guns would surpass the horns, In some 
conditions of atmosphere, irrespective of 
wind , sounds would penetrate much farther 
than at other times; while it was taken, as 
the result of former experiment, that sounds 
attain greatest audibility not down the wind, 
but across it. The maximum range of sound 
was sought out at sea and obtained 3 but this 
experiment, as then carried out, was far 
inferior to the same when tried from a 
balloon. In the case of observers at sea, 
there is always some extraneous sound 
present — the lapping of the water against the 
vessel's side ; the breeze stirring through the 
rigging, and so on; while in a lofty balloon 
the silence is profound. Moreover, the 
sound must travel directly down the wind 
and with the farther advantage of ascent ; 
thus a greater and surer record may 
be obtained. The most curious dis- 
covery, however, that the learned Professor 
claimed to have made was the existence of 
what he termed 4 * acoustic clouds/' £*,, 
floating masses of air of different density to 
that of the surrounding atmosphere, and 
which, though wholly invisible, are incapable 
of reflecting sound and causing echoes out of 
the empty air. Indeed, it was 
assumed that the rolling of 
thunder is due to reverberations 
not from frowning thunder- 
packs, but from flocculent 
masses of these acoustic 
vapours present always around 
us. 

Altogether the above-men- 
tioned investigations under- 
taken by Professor Tyndall 
under the auspices of Trinity 
House are the most important 
on record, and give the valu- 
able results of one of our most 
eminent experimentalists, 

Facilities, however, for further 
observations have rapidly de- 
veloped since then. Principles 
are better understood. New 
methods have been found, and 
instruments of extreme . delicacy introduced. 
Even the microscope has been called upon 
to lend its aid, and the trace of a suitable 
phonograph can be made to reveal to the 
eye differences of sound intensities difficult 
to compare by ear. 

It was, therefore, under most propitious 
circumstances that the first ascent which I 

Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



HEAR KUT 

[Fltotnaraph. 



MISS CAYLEY'S ADVENTURES. 



403 



quite out of it. You take my word for it : if 
you back Harold, you back a man who's not 
going to get anything ; while if you back me, 
you back the winnah, with a coronet into the 
bargain." And he smiled fatuously. 

I looked at him with a look that would 
have made a wiser man wince. But it fell 
flat on Lord Southminster. " Do you know 
why I do not rise and go down to my cabin 
at once ? " I said, slowly. " Because, if I 
did, somebody as I passed might see my 
burning cheeks — cheeks flushed with shame 
at your insulting proposal — and might 
guess that you had asked me, and that 
I had refused you. And I should shrink 
from the disgrace of anyone's knowing 
that you had put such a humiliation upon 
me. You have been frank with me — 
after your kind, Lord Southminster; frank 
with the frankness of a low and purely com- 
mercial nature. I will be frank with you in 
turn. You are right in supposing that I love 
Harold Tillington — a man whose name I 
hate to mention in your presence. But you 
are wrong in supposing that the disposition of 
Mr. Marmaduke Ashurst's money has or can 
have anything to do with the feelings I enter- 
tain towards him. I would marry him all the 
sooner if he were poor and penniless. You 
cannot understand that state of mind, of 
course : but you must be content to accept 
it. And I would not marry you if there 
were no other man left in the world to marry. 
I should as soon think of marrying a lump 
of dough." I faced him, all crimson. " Is 
that plain enough ? Do you see now that I 
really mean it ? " 

He gazed at me with a curious look, and 
twirled what he considered his moustache 
once more, quite airily. The man was 
imperturbable — a pachydermatous imbecile. 
" You're all wrong, yah know," he said, after 
a long pause, during which he had regarded 
me through his eye-glass as if I were a 
specimen of some rare new species. " You're 
all wrong, and yah won't believe me. But I 
tell yah, I know what I'm talking about. 
You think it's quite safe about Marmy's 
money — that he's left it to Harold, because 
you drew the will up. I assuah you that 
will's not worth the paper it's written on. 
You fancy Harold's a hot favourite : he's a 



rank outsidah. I give you a chance, and 
you won't take it. I want yah because you're 
a remarkable woman. Most of the Ethels 
cry when they're trying to make a fellah 
propose to 'em ; and I don't like 'em damp : 
but you have some go about yah. You insist 
upon backing the wrong man. But you'll 
find your mistake out yet." A bright idea 
struck him. " I say — why don't you hedge ? 
Leave it open till Marmy's gone, and then 
marry the winnah ? " 

It was hopeless trying to make this clod 
understand. His brain was not built with 
the right cells for understanding me. " Lord 
Southminster," I said, turning upon him, 
and clasping my hands, " I will not go away 
while you stop here. But you have some 
spark enough of a gentleman in your com- 
position, I hope, not to inflict your company 
any longer upon a woman who does not 
desire it. I ask you to leave me here alone. 
When you have gone, and I have had time 
to recover from your degrading offer, I may, 
perhaps, feel able to go down to my cabin." 

He stared at me with open blue eyes — 
those watery blue eyes. "Oh, just as you 
like," he answered. " I wanted to do you a 
good turn, because you're the only woman I 
evah really admiahed — to say admiah, don't 
you know; not trotted round like the Ethels : 
but you won't allow me. I'll go if you wish 
it ; though I tell you again, you're backing 
the wrong man, and soonah or latah you'll 
discover it. I don't mind laying you six to 
four against him, Howevah, I'll do one 
thing for yah : I'll leave this offah always 
open. I'm not likely to marry any othah 
woman — not good enough, is it? — and if 
evah you find out you're mistaken about 
Harold Tillington, remembah, honour bright, 
I shall be ready at any time to renew my 
offah." 

By this time, I was at boiling point. I 
could not find words to answer him. I waved 
him away angrily with one hand. He raised 
his hat with quite a jaunty air and strolled off 
forward, puffing his cigarette. I don't think 
he even knew the disgust with which he 
inspired me. 

I sat some hours with the cool air playing 
about my burning cheeks before I mustered 
up courage to rise and go down below again. 



by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



A nimal A dualities. 



Note, — Under this title we intend printing a series of perfectly authentic anecdotes of animal fife, 
illustrated by Mr. J. A, Shepherd \ an artist tang a favourite with readers of The Stfand Magazine, 
We shall be glad to receive similar anecdotes , fuliy authenticated by names of witnesses t for use in future 
number s w White the stories themselves will he matters of fact t it must be understood thai the artist Witt 
treat the subject with freedom and fancy ^ more with a view to art amusing commentary than to a mere 
representation of the occurrence. 



IV. 




*»i 



"D 








IISPLACED attachments among 



being a toad. A goose and a barn-door 
fowl are at least both birds, while the 



; | animals would seem to be some 

| what less rare than one might toad and the turtle-dove are of different 

J: expect. Last month we had an classes in the animal kingdom. More, it 

odd ease of love at first sight, was the turtle-dove who was enamoured 

on the part of a very fat and motherly old - the beautiful turtle-dove s type of felicity 




^> 




ESTER THE BIG TOAD, 



goose, for a barn-door cock. Now we have in affection; and it was the toad — the 
a quainter thing still- -the love-making of dank, ugljj^. despised toad — who rejected 
a turtle-do ve, the object of its affections its profferea lifi^tf 1 a 

L, IVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



ANIMAL ACTUALITIES. 



405 



I L A 1 

rYYVY 

? t I t I 

I 1' I J 1 



TYYXX 




1 SEFJMS SATISFACTORY, Otf THJE WHOUE," 



The creatures belonged to the private 
collection—some might call it a menagerie — 
kept by Mr. J. A. Shepherd, the artist It is 
a collection continually changing its personnel, 
there ars frequent additions of all sorts, and 
occasional subtractions because of death or 
escape. And as these fluctuations occur with 
little or no notice, questions of accommoda- 
tion are apt to arise, sometimes resulting in the 



" chumming-in * of strange companions, the 
governing consideration being that of who is 
likely to eat what On one of these occa- 
sions a number of lizards arrived at the 
menagerie — so many, that they filled the only 
reptile case then available, and crowded out 
an immense Italian toad + The problem of 
what to do with the homeless toad was con- 
sidered at length, and in the end it was 




by LiOOglC 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



4o6 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE, 



t AG 
TIYVA: 




decided that he could come to no harm in 
that part of the aviary reserved for the turtle- 
doves—at any rate, for a little while. 

Now, the collection happened just then to 
be rather short of turtle -doves, There were 
only three — a pair and a spinster, The pair 



from the sheltered comer he had been put in 
at. He crawled cautiously toward the centre 
of the aviary, and looked about him. The pair 
of doves took no notice, but the spinster was 
instantly alert. Here was the longed-for 
truelove at last. The dove was down from 



MNVYr 




11 COCHXt-Qu! 



were as ardent lovers as turtle-doves usually 
are, and all day long they billed and cooed, 
greatly to the jealous disgust of the solitary 
spinster. Till enter the big toad, very quietly. 



its perch immediately, bowing and rising and 
bending and cooing, to the extreme astonish- 
ment of the unenthusiastic toad, 

"Coo! " wfiwaiedft&'j' rt 'ooo ! coo^oo-oo!" 

IVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



ANIMAL ACTUALITIES. 



407 



ttVVV* 




And she rose to her best height, ducked 
alluringly, flopped and nestled, as is the 
manner of doves in their love-making. But 
the prosaic toad was not in the least in love ; 
in the phrase of the street, he * J wasn't taking 
any. 73 "Coo-00!" pleaded the dove once 
more, desperately, curtsying again, and 
then bobbing and rising like clockwork, 
M Coo-00-00 ! " But the toad had never seen 
love-making of this sort before, and didn't 
understand it at all. It struck him that 



on the whole the wisest proceeding would 
be to get out of it while he was safe. So 
he got 

He sneaked off sheepishly to a corner of 
the aviary where a few plants and pieces of 
rock offered shelter, and there he remained 
till accommodation was found for him else- 
where, and no blandishments of the discon- 
solate dove could bring him out. Till at 
last the dove gave up the attempt, and 
resigned itself to single blessedness. 




1 Goo<?k*--< —»«■ 0riQinal from 

by VjUUgn UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



Mysteries of Sound. 



By John M. Bacon. 




OME curious experiences with 
regard to the trickery of sound 
occurred to me during under- 
graduate days at Cambridge, 
to which I attribute an early 
predilection for the science 
and study of acoustics. 

While yet an out-college man, I was un- 
expectedly offered a set of rooms in the Old 
Court of Trinity, which rooms had been 
somewhat hurriedly vacated by a man of 
uncertain health and nervous temperament, 
who assigned no satisfactory reasons for sud- 
denly going into lodgings. It was the com- 
mencement of a dull October term, and 
I remember well how the bedmaker 
warned me against the rooms, which she 
characterized as "dreadful dismal." The 
cause, however, of this forbidding description 
was not revealed to me till some weeks after- 
wards, when boisterous winds chanced to set 
in with gloomy November weather, about 
which period, when sitting up reading, I 
used frequently to hear low, moaning sounds, 
as if some creature were in distress some- 
where in the lane outside. No one could 
explain the phenomenon, and it was not 
until months afterwards that I myself 
searched for the cause, and after some little 
difficulty discovered it. It was common- 
place enough. In a side room a piece of 
wall-paper pasted across a chink had de- 
veloped a crack, leaving two jagged or 
toothed edges, which, under certain con- 
ditions of draught, vibrated rapidly together, 
forming, as it were, a reed, and thus pro- 
ducing the sound above described. 

That ghost, like all others in my experience, 
was readily laid ; but another uncanny and 
more noteworthy occurrence shortly after- 
wards taught me yet more clearly how 
capricious sounds may become, and how 
hard to locate or explain. 

In a neighbouring staircase there lived 
(I beg pardon, "kept") another friend of 
mine, a man of much tougher fibre, who was 
reading — and over-reading — for a medical 
exam., and once, through a sleepless night, 
he was driven to distraction by what, in the 
morning, he described as mysterious voices 
apparently in the court outside, accompanied 
by rappings on a tin tray or the like ; yet, 
often as he rose and went to the window, 
there was nothing to be seen, and at last his 



over-wrought nerves gave way, and were not 
to be relieved until some of his friends 
succeeded in finding the cause of his 
disturbance, which was this : Over the 
way, in Caius College, where building 
was going on, an engine had broken 
down and workmen had been employed 
through the night in tinkering it up. This 
was the sole and sufficient explanation. It 
satisfactorily accounted for the existence of 
midnight voices and for the weird tappings, 
excited imagination supplying all the rest 
The instructive fact, however, brought home 
to my own mind was how unaccountably 
sounds may seem to behave themselves when 
the mind fails to interpret them aright, and 
how strangely different even a familiar noise 
may sound when heard amid dead silence. 
It has been my good fortune more than once 
since then to dispel idle imaginings that had 
been causing real disturbance and distress.* 

Occasions also have arisen which have 
stimulated me to construct sound instruments 
which, in performing certain novel functions, 
should attain objects of practical value. For 
example, on the occasion of an annual flower 
show held in my grounds, it has been neces- 
sary to summon visitors, many hundreds in 
number, and scattered over a large area, to 
certain side-shows. A horn or bell conveyed 
nothing in particular, but a specially-made 
trumpet, rigged on a scaffold 30ft high, 
commanded the whole ground, and a polite 
invitation gently spoken to the four winds 
has been easily heard by all. In the accom- 
panying illustration the instrument referred 
to is that in the foreground, and its efficiency 
and due proportions were only tentatively 
arrived at. 

Some ten years ago my attention was 
accidentally directed towards kindred acous- 
tical problems by circumstances which again 
may be considered as outside common 
experience. 

By the kindness and courtesy of the late 
Dean Church, I had been granted the 
privilege of making use of St. Paul's Cathe- 
dral for carrying out certain experiments deal- 
ing with terrestrial magnetism. I had chosen 
for my purpose a quiet summer's night, and 
all due arrangements having been made, I 
commenced a long vigil, sitting alone for 

* Once in 1895. in the case of the famous Ham ghost, near 
Hungerford. 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



THE BROTHERHOOD Of THE SEVEN KINGS, 



419 



" But have you no clue whatever to its 
whereahouts ? 75 I asked. 

" Nothing which I can call a clue. My 
belief is that we shall have to pull down the 
old pile before we find the passage." 

"I should like to search for it," I said, 
impulsively; "these sorts of things interest 
me immensely," 

" I could give you a sort of key, Head, if 
that would be any use," said Sherwood ; '* it is 
in an old black-letter book," As he spoke 
he crossed the room, took a book bound in 
vellum j with silver clasps, from a locked book- 
case, and, opening it, laid it before me, 

11 This book contains a history of Rokesby," 
he continued. "Can you read black-letter?" 
I replied that I could 
He then turned a page, and pointed to 
some rhymed words, " More than one 
expert has puzzled over these lines/ 3 he con- 
tinued. " Read for yourself." 
I read aloud, slowly : — 

When the Yew and Siar combines 
Draw it twenty cubits line ; 
Wait until the saintly lips 
Shall the belfry spire eclipse. 
Cubits eight across the first, 
There shall lie ihe tomb accurst* 




l REAP ALOUD, 



li And you have never succeeded in 
solving this?" I continued. 

M Wo have often tried, but never with 
success. The legend runs that the passage 
goes into the churchyard, and has a connec- 
tion with one of the old vaults, but I know 
nothing more. Shall we join Rosaly in the 
drawing-room ? " 

" May I copy this old rhyme first ? " I 
asked. 

My host looked at me curiously ; then he 
nodded. 1 took a memorandum-book irom 
my pocket and scribbled down the words. 
Mr. Sherwood then locked up the book in its 
accustomed place, and we left the subject of 
the secret passage and the ghost, to enjoy 
the rest of the evening in a more everyday 
manner. 

The next morning, Christmas Eve, was 
damp and chill, for a thaw had set in during 
the night. Miss Sherwood asked Dufrayer 
and me to help her with the church decora- 
tions, and we spent a busy morning in the 
very old Norman church just at the back of the 
vicarage. When we left it, on our way home 
to lunch, I could not help looking round the 
churchyard with interest. Where was the 
tomb accurst into which the 
secret passage ran ? As I 
could not talk, however, on 
the subject with Miss Sher- 
wood, I resolved, at least for 
the present, to banish it from 
my mind. A sense of strong 
depression was still hanging 
over me, and Mme. Koluchy, 
herself, seemed to pervade 
the air. Yet, surely, no 
place could be farther from 
her accustomed haunts than 
this secluded rectory at the 
base of the Cumberland Hills. 
"The day is brightening," 
.said Rosaly, turning her eyes 
on my face, as wc were 
entering the house ; " sup- 
pose we go for a walk after 
lunch ? If you like, we could 
go up Grey Tor and pay a 
visit to Mother Heriot. 3 ' 

"Mother Heriot?" I re- 
peated, in astonishment, 

" Yes— the herb-woman — 

but do you know about her ? " 

" Your father spoke about 

a woman of the name last 

night." 

" Oh, I know," replied 
qj^lift^i^herwood, hastily; 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



4io 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



Altogether it was firmly impressed upon 
me from that time onwards that a balloon 
ascent properly arranged would offer an ex- 
ceptional opportunity for studying many 
problems in sound which could nut fail to 
repay fresh investigation and experiment ; and 
it is not a little curious that, although acoustics 
have occupied the special attention of many 
scientists, no one has come forward to 
systematically utilize the balloon in the service 
of that all important branch of science. 

I am confident, however, that the subject 
here broached is likely to become a popular 
one, and considering how important a part 
sound signals play- -and always must play 
on our railways, and yet more especially in 
navigation rotond our coasts, any inquiry that 
may lead to further knowledge and improve- 
ment in this direction cannot fail to possess 
interest. 

The results o( former investigation have 
been instructive, in many ways, and I may be 
pardoned for a brief retrospect 

On scientific matters our grandfathers, 
apparently, were easily satisfied with such 
plausible theories as seemed fairly convincing 
and intelligible, and it was with reluctance 
that they admitted any facts tending to upset 
preconceived opinions. This statement is 



the passage of light, so must rain or fog, of 
sorts, deaden sound. This was formerly 
regarded as self-evident It is now know + n 
to be absolutely untrue. It has been proved 
over and over again that when the sky is 
thickest, when all view is lost and danger 
may be at hand, and unsuspected, then it is 
that Nature comes to our aid in her own 
way, It is just then that sounds lend us 
their readiest warning; that the approaching 
train may be heard a mile farther than 
usual ; that the horse's footfall, the rattle of 
the wheels, the shout of a human voice — 
all such sounds ring out with umvonted 
clearness. 
# And Nature in another mood will some- 
times give other utterance to her secrets, and 
in mysterious echoes mock our words and 
taunt us as it were for our lack of knowledge 
of her laws. A symmetrical building, or 
courtyard, rigidly four-square, will give us an 
echo the elements of which common sense 
can assign and calculate. But if we hunt 
for them, we can pick up other echoes un- 
accountable enough to set mere theory well- 
nigh at defiance. Killarney is the home of 
such echoes, but you may find a like natural 
magic in any woodland or rocky district 
Take the Cumberland lake country, where 




From ff| 



CKUMMOCK TftATfcl?. 



I i'ktiittffiaph. 



at least true with regard to the science of 
sound, and we can easily support it. 

For example, we find it accepted as a fact, 
not to be challenged, that as rain and mist 
and haze of any kind obviously interfere with 



by Google 



not only will the cliff rising bluff from 
Crummock return your voice across the 
silent lake, but at times even down the slant 
of Lodore amid the plash of water, and where 
all around is but broken rock and dense 

Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE SEVEN KINGS, 



42; 



Mother Heriot has a visitor staying with her, 
no less a person than the greatest fortune- 
teller in England, the Queen of the Gipsies ; 
she is spending a couple of nights in the hut. 
Mother Heriot suggests that the Queen of 
the Gipsies shall tell us our fortunes. It will 
be quite magnificent. " 

" I wonder if the woman she alludes to is 
one of the gipsies who arrived at Rokesby 
Station yesterday," I said, turning to Dufrayer. 

" Very possibly," he answered, just raising 
his brows. 

Rosaly continued to speak, in great excite- 
ment. 

" You consent, don't you ? " she said to us 
both. 

" Certainly," said Dufrayer, with a smile. 

" All right, mother," cried Miss Sherwood, 
turning once again to the herb-woman ; " we 
will have our fortunes told, and your gipsy 
friend shall tell them. Will she come out to 
us here, or shall we go in to her ? " 

Again there was a quick pantomime of 
fingers and hands. Rosaly began to interpret. 

" Mother Heriot says that she will speak to 
her first She seems to stand in considerable 
awe of her." 

The herb-woman vanished inside the hut. 
We continued to stand on the threshold. 

I looked at Dufrayer, who gave me an 
answering glance of amusement. Our po- 
sition was ridiculous, and yet, ridiculous as it 
seemed, there was a curiously tense feeling 
at my heart, and my depression grew greater 
than ever. I felt myself to be standing on 
the brink of a great catastrophe, and could 
not understand my own sensations. 

The herb - woman returned, and Miss 
Sherwood eagerly interpreted. 

" How queer ! " she exclaimed. " The 
gipsy will only see me alone. I am to meet 
her in the hut. Shall I go ? " 

"I should advise you to have nothing to 
do with the matter," ^aid Dufrayer. 

" Oh, but I am curious. I should like to," 
she answered. 

"Well, we will wait for you ; but don't put 
faith in her silly words." 

The girl's face slightly paled. She entered 
the hut ; we remained outside. "* 

" Knowing her peculiar idiosyncrasy, I 
wonder if we did right to let her go in ? " I 
said to my friend. 

" Why not ? " said Dufrayer. 

"With such a disposition she ought not to 
be indulged in ridiculous superstitions," I 
said. 

"She cannot take such nonsense seriously," 
was his reply. He was leaning up against 

Digitized by Gt 



the lintel of the little hut, his arms folded, 
his eyes looking straight before him. I had 
never seen his face look keener or more 
matter-of-fact. 

A moment later Miss Sherwood re-appeared. 
There was a marked, and quite terrible, 
change in her face — it was absolutely white. 
She avoided our eyes, slipped a piece of 
silver into Mother Heriot's hand, and said, 
quickly : — 

" Let us hurry home ; it is turning very 
cold." 

"Now, what is it?" said Dufrayer, as we 
began to descend the mountain ; " you look 
as if you had heard bad news." 

"The Queen of the Gipsies was very 
mysterious," said the girl. 

" What sort of person was she ? " I asked. 

" I cannot tell you, Mr. Head ; I saw very 
little of her. She was in a dark part of the 
hut, and was in complete shadow. She took 
my hand and looked at it, and said what I 
am not allowed to repeat." 

" I am sorry you saw her," I answered, " but 
surely you don't believe her ? You are too 
much a girl of the latter end of the 
nineteenth century to place your faith in 
fortune-tellers." 

" But that is just it," she answered ; " I am 
not a girl of the nineteenth century at all, 
and I do most fully believe in fortune- 
telling and all kinds of superstitions. I 
wish we hadn't gone. What I have heard 
does affect me strangely, strangely. I wish 
we had not gone." 

We were now descending the hill, but 
as we walked Miss Sherwood kept glancing 
behind her as if afraid of someone or some- 
thing following us. Suddenly she stopped, 
turned round and clutched my arm. 

" Hark ! Who is that?" she whispered, 
pointing her hand towards a dark shadow 
beneath the trees. " There is someone 
coming after us, I am certain there is. 
Don't you see a figure behind that clump ? 
Who can it be ? Listen." 

We waited and stood silent for a moment, 
gazing towards the spot which the girl had 
indicated. The sharp snap of a dead twig 
followed by the rustling noise of rapidly 
retreating footsteps sounded through the 
stillness. I felt Miss Sherwood's hand 
tremble on my arm. 

" There certainly was someone there," said 
Dufrayer ; " but why should not there be ? " 

" Why, indeed ? " I echoed. " There is 
nothing to be frightened about, Miss Sher- 
wood. It is doubtless one of Mother 
Heriot's bucolic patients." 



I I CI I I I -• I I I 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



412 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



may be sounds of much penetration as 
interpreted by the hearing faculty of other 
creatures, A curious illustration of this fact 
is to be noticed near my own home in 
Berkshire. I have often gone out on my 
lawn just before nine o'clock on a still night, 
when the wind was either dead calm or else 
blowing softly from the south, and having 
accurate time, have listened with all my ears 
for the report of the evening gun at Ports- 
mouth, forty miles away, but neither myself 
nor any friends who have been with me have 
ever succeeded in catching even the slightest 
suspicion of the sound. Yet you may go to 
the neighbouring preserves, and, precisely 
after the hour, the pheasants will give a 
startled flutter. Unquestionably, the birds 
detect the sound that, too feeble to affect 
ourselves, yet conveys alarm to their more 
sensitive hearing* The same may also be 
said of other vibrations which are not 
feeble, but on the contrary intense and rapid 
— in fact, so rapid as to be just beyond 
the human auditory scale. Mr. F. Gal ton, 
the famous anthropologist, has invented a 
little whistle with an adjustable plug, by 
which it can be rendered more and more 
shrill until it ceases to give any true note 
at all to our ears ; yet a little dog may clearly 
hear it as a whistle still, and respond readily 




WHISTLE 

From, a I 



INVENTED BY MR. F. GALTON, WHICH A DOG CAN 
NOT A HUMAN PIKING. 



to its call. The little instrument, in use, is 
here pictured. 

Many of the facts just mentioned were 
dealt with by the late Professor Tyndall in a 
memorable series of experiments carried on 
chiefly at South Foreland. The results of 
that inquiry fairly took the scientific world 
by surprise. It went to show that the 



byCiC 



k" 



behaviour of sound was not always the same. 
That on some occasions horns could be heard 
farther than guns ; on another occasion the 
guns would surpass the horns. In some 
conditions of atmosphere, irrespective of 
wind, sounds would penetrate much farther 
than at other times; w T hile it was taken, as 
the result of former experiment, that sounds 
attain greatest audibility not down the wind, 
but across it. The maximum range of sound 
was sought out at sea and obtained, but this 
experiment, as then carried out, was far 
inferior to the same when tried from a 
balloon. In the case of observers at sea, 
there is always some extraneous sound 
present — the lapping of the water against the 
vessel's side ; the breeze stirring through the 
rigging, and so on; while in a lofty balloon 
the silence is profound. Moreover, the 
sound must travel directly down the wind 
and with the farther advantage of ascent j 
thus a greater and surer record may 
be obtained. The most curious dis- 
covery, however, that the learned Professor 
claimed to have made was the existence of 
what he termed u acoustic clouds," i.e., 
floating masses of air of different density to 
that of the surrounding atmosphere, and 
which, though wholly invisible, are incapable 
of reflecting sound and causing echoes out of 
the empty air* Indeed, it was 
assumed that the rolling of 
thunder is due to reverberations 
not from frowning thunder- 
packs, but from flocculent 
masses of these acoustic 
vapours present always around 
us. 

Altogether the above-men- 
tioned investigations under- 
taken by Professor Tyndall 
under the auspices of Trinity 
House are the most important 
on record, and give the valu- 
able results of one of our most 
eminent experimentalists. 

Facilities, however, for further 
observations have rapidly de- 
veloped since then. Principles 
are better understood. New 
methods have been found, and 
instruments of extreme . delicacy introduced. 
Even the microscope has been called upon 
to lend its aid, and the trace of a suitable 
phonograph can be made to reveal to ihe 
eye differences of sound intensities difficult 
to compare by ear. 

It was, therefore, under most propitious 
circumstances that the first ascent which I 

Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



HEAR liVT 

[ Photograph, 



THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE SEVEN KINGS. 



4*3 



" Vou are troubled about something/' I 
said 

" Oh, lama very silly girl/' she replied. 

" Will you not tell me about it ? " I con- 
tinued. " I will respect your confidence, and 
give you my sympathy."' 

M I ought not to encourage my nervous 
fears," she replied. " By the way, did father 
tell you about the legend connected with this 
house ? " 

" He did." 

" This is the night when the herb-woman 
appears." 

"My dear child, you don't suppose that a 
spirit from the other world really comes back 
in that fashion ! 
Dismiss it from 
your mind — 
there is nothing 
in it." 

"So you say/' 
she answered, 
u but you never 
saw " — she be- 
gan to tremble, 
and raising her 
hand brushed it 
across her eyes, 
"I feel a ghostly 
influence in the 
air," she said ; 
** I know that 
something 
dreadful will 
happen to- 
night." 

"You think 
that, because 
the fortune-teller 
frightened you 
yesterday." 

She gave me 
a startled and 
wide-awake 
glance. 

"What do 
you mean ? " 

u I judge from 
your face and manner* If you will take 
courage and unburden your mind, I may, 
doubtless, be able to dispel your fears." 

" But she told me what she did under the 
promise of secrecy ; dare I break my word ? " 

" Under the circumstances, yes/' I 
answered, quickly. 

" Very well, I will tell you* 1 don't feel 
as if I could keep it to myself another 
moment. But you on your part must faith- 
fully promise that it shall go no farther." 

Digitized by Google 




MISS SHERWOOD TuOK OtfE «F MV HASDS I % f IIOTH IIF.tt OWN, 



H I will make the promise," I said. 
She looked me full in the face, 
" Come into the conservatory," she said. 
She took my hand, and led me out of the 
long, low drawing-room into a great con- 
servatory at the farther end. It was lit with 
many Chinese lanterns, which gave a dim, 
and yet bright, effect. We went and stood 
under a large lemon tree, and Miss Sherwood 
took one of my hands in both her own. 

" I shall never forget that scene yester- 
day," she said. " I could scarcely see the face 
of the gipsy, but her great, brilliant eyes 
pierced the gloom, and the feel of her hand 
thrilled me when it touched mine. She 

asked me to 
kneel by her, 
and her voice 
was very full, 
and deep, and 
of great power ; 
it was not like 
that of an un- 
educated wo- 
man. She spoke 
very slowly, with 
a pause between 
each word, 

" ' I pity you, 

for you are close 
to death, 3 she 
began. 

" I felt myself 
quite incapable 
of replying, and 
she continued :— 
11 ' Not your 
own death, nor 
even that of 
your father, but 
all the same you 
are very close to 
death. Death 
will soon touch 
you, and it will 
be cold, and 
mysterious, and 
awful, and try as 
you may, you cannot guard against it, for it 
will come from a very unlooked-for source, 
and be instant and swift in its work. Now 
ask me no more— go ! ' 

" ' But what about the fortunes of the two 
gentlemen who are waiting outside ? ' I said. 
" ( 1 have told you the fortunes of those 
men/ she answered ; ( go ! ' 

" She waved me away with her hand, and I 
went out That is all, Mr. Head. I do not 
know what it means, but you can understand 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



424 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



that to a nervous girl like me it has come as 
a shock." 

44 1 can, truly," I replied ; " and now you 
must make up your mind not to think of it 
any more. The gipsy saw that you were 
nervous, and she thought she would heighten 
the impression by words of awful portent, 
which doubtless mean nothing at all." 

Rosaly tried to smile, and I think my 
words comforted her. She little guessed the 
battle I was having with my own heart. The 
unaccountable depression which had assailed 
me of late now gathered thick like a pall. 

Late that evening I went to Dufrayer's 
room. I had promised Miss Sherwood that 
I would not betray her confidence, but the 
words of the gipsy in the herb-woman's hut 
kept returning to me again and again. 

44 1 pity you, for you are close to death. You 
cannot guard against it, for it will come from 
an unlooked-for source, and be instant and 
swift in its work" 

44 What is the matter ? " said Dufrayer, 
glancing into my face. 

44 1 am depressed," I replied ; 44 the ghostly 
legend belonging to this house is affecting me." 

He smiled. 

44 And by the way," I added, 4C you are 
sleeping in the room where the murder was 
committed." 

He smiled again, and gave me a glance of 
amused commiseration. 

44 Really, Head," he cried, 44 this sort of 
thing is unlike you. Surely old wives' fables 
ought not to give you a moment's serious 
thought. The fact that an unfortunate lad 
was murdered in this room cannot affect my 
nerves some twenty years afterwards. Do go 
to bed, my dear fellow ; you need a long sleep." 

He bade me good-night/ I had no excuse 
to linger, and I left him. 

Just as 1 had reached the door, he called 
after me. 

44 Good-night, old man ; sleep well." 

I turned and looked at him. He was 
standing by the window, his face was towards 
me, and he still wore that inscrutable smile 
which was one of his special characteristics. 
I left him. I little guessed .... 

I retired to my room ; my brain was on 
fire ; it was impossible for me to rest. What 
was yesterday but a vague suspicion was now, 
assuming the form of a certainty. Only one 
person could have uttered the words which 
Miss Sherwood had heard. Beyond doubt, 
Madame Koluchy had known ofour proposed 
visit to Rokesby. Beyond doubt, she, in 
company with some gipsies, had joined our 
train, and when we arrived at Rokesby, she 



by L^OOgle 



alighted there also. With her knowledge of 
the gipsies, an acquaintanceship with Mother . 
Heriot would be easily made. To take 
refuge in her hut would be a likely contin- 
gency. Why had she done so? What 
mischief could she do to us from such a 
vantage point ? Suddenly, like a vivid flash, 
the memory of the secret passage, which 
none of the inmates of the house could dis- 
cover, returned to me. In all probability 
this passage was well known to Mother 
Heriot, for had not her mother committed 
the murder which had taken place in this 
very house, and did not the legend say that 
she had entered the house, and quitted it 
again, through the secret passage ? 

I quickly made up my mind. I must act, 
and act at once. I would go straight to the 
hut ; I would confront Madame ; I would meet 
her alone. In open combat I had nothing 
to fear. Anything was better than this wear- 
ing and agonizing suspense. 

I waited in my room until the steps of the 
old rector retiring for the night were heard, 
and then went swiftly downstairs. I took 
the key of the hall door from its hook on the 
wall, opened it, locked it behind me, went to 
the stables, secured a lantern, and then began 
my ascent of Grey Tor. 

The night was clear and starlit, the moon 
had not yet risen, but the stars made sufficient 
light for me to see my way. After a little 
over an hour's hard walking, I reached the 
herb-woman's hut. I thundered on the door 
with my stick, and in a minute the dame 
appeared. Suddenly I remembered that she 
was dumb, but she could hear. I spoke to her. 

44 1 have a word to say to the stranger 
who was here yesterday," I began. 44 Is she 
within ? I must see her at once." 

The herb-woman shook her head. 

44 1 do not believe you," I said ; 44 stand 
aside, I must search the hut" 

She stood aside, and I entered. There 
was no one else present. The hut was small, 
a glance showed me each corner — the herb- 
woman's guest had departed. 

Without even apologizing for my abrupt 
intrusion, I quickly ran down the mountain, 
and, as I d!d so, the queer rhyme which con- 
tained the key to the secret passage occurred 
to my memory. I had my memorandum- 
book with me ; I opened it now, and read 
the words : — 

When the Yew and Star combine, 
Draw it twenty cubits line ; 
Wait until the saintly lips 
Shall the belfry spire eclipse. 
Cubits eight across the first, 
There shall lie the tomb accurst. 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



MYSTERIES OF SOUND, 



4'5 




THE CAPTIVE BALLOON, 



[ I'ln.twir^tfh 



may be gathered from the first illustra- 
tion of this paper, where a photograph 
or some of them is reproduced, and in 
which it may be noticed that the tarr- 
ing of the longer tubes is less abrupt than 
in the short instrument— really made for a 
foreign Government The right degree of 
taper was discovered only by experiment, and 
was found to be a most important factor in 
construction. The tub-like resonant receiver 
on the left responds to concussions by the 
singing of piano-wires stretched within, and 
the duration of their vibrations is the measure 
of the sound tested* Among other instru- 
ments used must here be mentioned the 
ubiquitous bicycle, which proved simply 
invaluable for rapidly and silently travelling 
from station to station. 

Our balloon, of 4,000 cubic feet capacity, 
under the pilotage of Messrs, P. and A. 
Spencer, was first utilized as a "captive/' 
after which it was liberated at an exact 
moment, and as it rose aloft the well -rehearsed 
programme was once more carried through, 
and without a hitch. At every half-minute pre- 
concerted signals were delivered below, and 
their arrival accurately timed and determined 



in the steadily retreating car. 
First in order came simple 
speech, a word of command, 
a cry, a shout, then the blast of 
a horn, of two horns, of various 
forms of horns, of horns in 
unison, in harmony, and in dis- 
cord. Then a rifle party formed 
up and fired single shots, then 
a roll, then a volley. After that, 
steam-power instruments lent 
their voices: and lastly the 
powerful fog-signals were requi- 
sitioned, and ear-splitting 
reports roared out at due in- 
tervals, until the voyagers had 
got a start of full half an houn 

Meanwhile, it had been 
arranged that the tenor bell of 
a neighbouring church should 
be set ringing, and guns of 
different calibre fired at Ports- 
mouth, so that any exalted 
power of hearing aloft might 
be estimated. All worked well. 
The comparison of sounds 
travelling upwards was well 
registered, their penetration 
tested in calm silence, the 
blending of different notes, the 
toning -down of discord, and 
even the velocity of sound as 
to upper strata. This was not 
The occupants of the car 



by Google 



it travelled 
a difficult feat 

knew to a fraction of a second when each 
fog - signal was fired, They also knew 
every field and homestead over which they 
journeyed, and their own height Thus, the 
elements of time and space were determined, 
and the mean of many observations could be 
taken. Many other problems were grappled 
with, and among many results perhaps none 
was more convincing than when at a great 
height we tried the effect of a trumpet 
upon a group of harvesters below, and put 
the question : u What's the time ? t: and after 
due interval the answer, gathered in our big 
receiver, came up with an unmistakable — 
u Six o'clock." 

This was a record in itself, and would have 
given sufficient proof, if proof had been 
wanting, that our maiden scientific ascent 
has brought us excellent promise for the 
future. Our memorandum-books are filled 
with notes, and we may at least assert that 
of all our previous results, noticed above, 
none have been disproved, while we fairly 
feel ourselves in hot pursuit of fresh and 
further fact 

Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



The Brotherhood of the Seven - Kings. 

By L. T. Meade and Robert Eustace. 
X.— THE DOOM. 




HE mysterious disappearance 
of Mme, Koluchy was now 
the universal topic of conver- 
sation. Her house was de- 
serted, her numerous satellites 
were not to be found. The 
woman herself had gone as it were from the 
face of the earth. Nearly every detective in 
London was engaged in her pursuit. Scot- 
land Yard had never been more agog with 
excitement ; but day after day passed, and 
there was not the most remote tidings of her 
capture. No clue to her whereabouts could 
be obtained. That she was alive was certain, 
however, and my apprehensions never 
slumbered. I began to see that cruel face 
in my dreams, and whether I went abroad or 
whether I stayed at home, it equally haunted 
me. 

A few days before Christmas I had a visit 
from Dufrayer. He found me pacing up 
and down my laboratory. 

" What is the matter ? " he said. 

" The old story," I answered. 

He shook his head. 

" This won't do, Norman ; you must turn 
your attention to something else." 

44 That is impossible," I replied, raising 
haggard eyes to his face. 

He came up and laid his hand on my 
shoulder. 

" You want change, Head, and you must 
have it. I have come in the nick of time 
with an invitation which ought to suit us 
both. We have been asked down to Rokesby 
Rectory to spend Christmas with my old 
friend, the rector. You have often heard 
me talk of William Sherwood. He is one 
of the best fellows I know. Shall I accept 
the invitation for us both ? " 

" Where is Rokesby Rectory ? " I asked. 

" In Cumberland, about thirty miles 
from Lake Windermere, a most picturesque 
quarter. We shall have as much seclusion 
as we like at Sherwood's house, and the air 
is bracing. If we run down next Monday, 
we shall be in time for a merry Christmas. 
What do you say? " 

I agreed to accompany Dufrayer, and the 
following Monday, at an early hour, we started 
on our journey. Nothing of any moment 
occurred, except that at one of the large 
junctions a party of gipsies got into a third- 
class compartment near our own. Amongst 



by Google 



them I noticed one woman, taller than the 
rest, who wore a shawl so arranged over her 
head as to conceal her face. The unusual 
sight of gipsies travelling by train attracted 
my attention, and I remarked on it to 
Dufrayer. Later on I noticed, too, that they 
were singing, and that one voice was clear, 
and full, and rich. The circumstance, how- 
ever, made very little impression on either 
of us. 

At Rokesby Station the gipsies left the 
train, and each of them carried his or her 
bundle, disappearing almost immediately into 
a thick pine forest, which stretched away to 
the left of the little station. 

The peculiar gait of the tall woman attracted 
me, and I was about to mention it to 
Dufrayer, when Sherwood's sudden appear- 
ance and hurried, hospitable greeting put it 
out of my head. Sherwood was a true 
specimen of a country parson ; his views were 
broad-minded, and he was a thorough sports- 
man. 

The vicarage was six miles from the 
nearest station, but the drive through the 
bracing air was invigorating, and I felt some 
of the heaviness and depression which had 
made my life a burden of late already leaving 
me. 

When we reached the house we saw a 
slenderly-made girl standing in the porch. 
She held a lamp in her hand, and its bright 
light illuminated each feature. She had 
dark eyes and a pale, somewhat nervous face ; 
she could not have been more than eighteen 
years of age. 

" Here we are, Rosaly," called out her 
father, " and cold too after our journey. I 
hope you have seen to the fires." 

" Yes, father ; the house is warm and com- 
fortable," was the reply. 

The girl stepped on to the gravel, and 
'held out her hand to Dufrayer, who was an 
old friend. Dufrayer turned and introduced 
me. 

"Mr. Head, Rosaly," he said; "you have 
often heard me talk of him." 

" Many times," she answered. " How do 
you do, Mr. Head ? I am very glad indeed 
to welcome you here — you seem quite like an 
old friend ; but come in both of you, do —you 
must be frozen." 

She led the way into the house, and we 
found ourselves in a spacious and very lofty 

Original from 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE SEVEN KINGS. 



427 



r 











^--l*r& 



A KUirtiH'LUOJCJNf; MAN WAS B&MDIEtti QVRK JAIL. 

moment my eyes met his, u The lady said 
to throw cold water on you and you'd be 
tetter*" 

The man's words roused me as no ordinary 
restorative could do. I sat up, and the next 
moment had tottered to my feet. 

" The lady ? " I said " Did you mention 
a lady? What lady?" 

" A tall lady/ 1 was the reply, u a stranger 
in these parts. She was bending over you 
when I come along. She had black eyes, 
and I thought she was giving you something 
to bring you round. When she saw me she 
said, l You dash cold water over him, and 
he'll come to,' " 

" But where is the lady now ? " I gasped. 

** There by yonder hill, just going over the 
brow, don't you see ? n 

"I do, and I know who she is. I must 
overtake her. Good-bye, my man, I am all 
right." 

So I was : the sudden stimulus had renewed 
my faltering strength, I recognised that 
figure. With that grace, inimitable and 
perfect, which never at any moment deserted 
it, it was. moving from my view. Yes, I 
knew it. Mme. Koluchy hud doubtless 



by Google 



found me by the wayside, and 
had meant to complete the 
work which she had begun last 
night- Had she still possessed 
her syringe I should now have 
been a dead man. Where was 
she going ? Doubtless to catch 
the very train to which I was 
hurrying. If so, we should meet 
almost immediately. I hurried 
forward, Once again I caught 
sight of the figure in the far 
distance. I could not get up 
to it, and suddenly I felt that 
I did not want to, I should 
meet her in London to-night. 
That was my thought of 
thoughts* 

As I approached the great 
junction I heard the whistle of 
a coming train. It was the 
express. It dashed into the 
station just as I reached it I 
was barely in time. Without 
waiting for a ticket I stumbled 
almost in a fainting condition 
into the first carriage I could 
reach, The train moved on. 
I felt a sudden sense of satisfac- 
tion. Mme* Koluchy was also 
on board. 

How that awful journey was 
passed is difficult for me to remember. 
Beyond the thought of thoughts that 
Madame and I were rushing to London by 
the same train, that we should beyond doubt 
meet soon, I had little feeling of any sort. 
Her hour was close at hand my hour of 
vengeance was nigh. 

At the first junction I handed two telegrams 
to a porter and desired him to send them off 
immediately. They were to Tyler and Ford, 
When between eight and nine o'clock that 
night we reached Euston, the detectives were 
waiting for me. 

tl Mme. Koluchy is in the train/ 5 I said 
to them ; " you can apprehend her if you are 
quick — there is not an instant to lose." 

The men in wild excitement began to 
search along the platform, I followed them* 
Surely Madame could not have already es- 
caped. She had not the faintest idea that I 
was in the train ; she would take things 
leisurely when she reached Eustom So I had 
hopedj but my hopes were falsified. Nowhere 
could we get even a glimpse of the face for 
which we sought. 

"Ne\er mind/ 1 said Ford, "I also have 
news, and I believe that our success is 
Original from 

UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



4i8 



THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



dropped her voice, and a faint sigh escaped 
her lips. 

I looked at her again with curiosity. 

" The place was spoiled by the last rector/' 
she went on. " He and his family committed 
many acts of vandalism, but father has done 
his best to restore the house to its ancient 
appearance. You shall see it to-morrow, if 
you are really interested." 

" I take a deep interest in old houses," I 
answered ; " and this, from the little I have 
seen of it, is quite to my mind. Doubtless 
you have many old legends in connection 
with it, and if you have a real ghost it will 
complete the charm." 

I smiled as I spoke, but the next instant 
the smile died on my lips. A sudden flame 
of colour had rushed into' Miss Sherwood's 
face, leaving it far paler than was natural. 
She dropped her napkin, and stooped to pick 
it up. As she did so, I observed that the 
rector was looking at her anxiously. He 
immediately burst into conversation, com- 
pletely turning the subject into what I 
considered a trivial channel. 

A few moments later the young girl rose 
and left us to our wine. 

As soon as we were alone, Sherwood asked 
us to draw our chairs to the fire and began to 
speak. 

"I heard what you said to Rosaly, Mr. 
Head," he began ; u and I am sorry now that 
I did not warn you. There is a painful legend 
connected with this old house, and the ghost 
whom you so laughingly alluded to exists, as 
far as my child is concerned, to a painful 
degree." 

" Indeed," I answered. 

"I do not believe in the ghost myself," he 
continued ; " but I do believe in the 
influence of a very strong, nervous terror 
over Rosaly. If you like, I will tell you the 
story." 

" Nothing could please me better," I 
answered. 

The rector opened a fresh box of cigars, 
handed them to us, and began. 

" The man who was my predecessor here 
had a scapegrace son, who got into serious 
trouble with a peasant girl in this forest. He 
took the girl to London, and then deserted 
her. She drowned herself. The boy's 
father vowed he would never see the- lad 
again, but the mother pleaded for him, and 
there was a sort of patched-up reconciliation. 
He came down to spend Christmas in the 
house, having faithfully promised to turn 
over a new leaf. There were festivities and 
high mirth. 



by Google 



"On Christmas night the whole family 
retired to bed as usual, but soon afterwards 
a scream was heard issuing from the room 
where the young man slept — the West Room 
it is called. By the way, it is the one you are 
to occupy, Dufrayer. The rector rushed into 
the room, and, to his horror and surprise, 
found the unfortunate young man dead, 
stabbed to the heart. There was, naturally, 
great excitement and alarm, more particularly 
when it was discovered that a well-known 
herb-woman, the mother of the girl whom the 
young man had decoyed to London, had 
been seen haunting the place. Rumour 
went so far as to say that she had entered 
the house by means of a secret passage 
known only to herself. Her name was 
Mother Heriot, and she was regarded by 
the villagers as a sort of witch. This woman 
was arrested on suspicion ; but nothing was 
definitely proved against her, and no trial 
took place. Six weeks later she was found 
dead in her hut, on Grey Tor, and since 
then the rumour is that she haunts the 
rectory on each Christmas night — entering 
the house through the secret passage which 
we none of us can discover. This story is 
rife in the house, and I suppose Rosaly heard 
it from her old nurse. Certain it is that, 
when she was about eight years old, she was 
found on Christmas night screaming violently, 
and declaring that she had seen the herb- 
woman, who entered her room and bent 
down over her. Since then her nerves have 
never been the same. Each Christmas as it 
comes round is a time of mental terror to her, 
although she tries hard to struggle against 
her fears. On her account I shall be glad 
when Christmas is over. I do my best to 
make it cheerful, but I can see that she 
dreads it terribly." 

" What about the secret passage ? " I inter- 
rupted. 

" Ah ! I have something curious to tell 
you about that," said the old rector, rising as 
he spoke. " There is not the least doubt 
that it exists. It is said to have been made 
at the time of the Monmouth Rebellion, and 
is supposed to be connected with the church- 
yard, about two hundred yards away; but 
although we have searched, and have even 
had experts down to look into the matter, we 
have never been able to get the slightest clue 
to its whereabouts. My impression is that it 
was bricked up long ago, and that whoever 
committed the murder entered the house by 
some other means. Be that as it may, the 
passage cannot be found, and we have long 
ceased to trouble ourselves about it," 



u I I I '_> I I I 



UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 



THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE SEVEN KINGS. 



419 



" But have you no clue whatever to its 
whereabouts ? " I asked. 

"Nothing which I can call a clue. My 
belief is that we shall have to pull down the 
o!d pile before we find the passage," 

" I should like to search for it/' I said, 
impulsively; " these sorts of things interest 
me immensely." 

" 1 could give you a sort of key, Head, if 
that would beany use," said Sherwood ; " it is 
in an old black-letter book." As he spoke 
he crossed the room, took a book bound in 
vellum, with silver clasps, from a locked book- 
case, and, opening it, laid it before me. 

"This book contains a history of Rokesby," 
he continued, "Can you read black-letter?" 
I replied that I could. 
He then turned a page, and pointed to 
some rhymed words. " More than one 
expert has puzzled over these lines," he con- 
tinued " Read for yourself/ 1 
I read aloud, slowly : — 

When I he Yew ami Star combine, 
Draw it twenty cubits lire ; 
Wait until Ihe saintly lips 
Shall the belfry spire eclipse. 
Cubits eight across the first, 
There shall lie the tomb accurst. 




1 BEAD ALOUD, SLOWLY/ 

byViOOgle 



"And you have never succeeded in 
solving this?*' I continued. 

"We have often tried, but never with 
success. The legend runs that the passage 
goes into the churchyard, and has a connec- 
tion with one of the old vaults, but I know 
nothing mora Shall we join Rosaly in the 
drawing-room ? " 

"May I copy this old rhyme first?'* I 
asked. 

My host looked at me curiously ; then he 
nodded. I took a memorandum-book from 
my pocket and scribbled down the words. 
Mr, Sherwood then locked up the book in its 
accustomed place, and we left the subject of 
the secret passage and the ghost, to enjoy 
the rest of the evening in a more everyday 
manner. 

The next morning, Christmas Eve, was 
damp and chill, for a thaw had set in during 
the night. Miss Sherwood asked Dufrayer 
and me to help her with the church decora- 
tions, and we spent a busy morning in the 
very old Norman church just at the back of the 
vicarage, When we left it, on our way home 
to lunch, I could not help looking round the 
churchyard with interest- Where was the 
tomb accurst into which the 
secret passage ran ? As I 
could not talk, however, on 
the subject with Miss Sher- 
wood, I resolved, at least for 
the present, to banish it from 
my mind, A sense of strong 
depression was still hanging 
over me, and Mme« Koluchy, 
herself, seemed to pervade 
the air. Yet, surely, no 
place could be farther from 
her accustomed haunts than 
this secluded rectory at the 
base of the Cumberland Hills. 
"The day is brightening," 
said Rosaly, turning her eyes 
on my face, as we were 
entering the house ; " sup- 
pose we go for a walk after 
lunch ? If you like, we could 
go up Grey Tor and pay a 
visit to Mother Heriot." 

"Mother Heriot?" I re- 
peated, in astonishment. 

" Yes— the herb-woman— 

but do you know about her? " 

" Your father spoke about 

a woman of the name last 

night" 

" Oh, I know/' replied 

irigirlft i ffcft herwood » hastil y? 
UNIVERSITYOF MICHIGAN 



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THE STRAND MAGAZINE. 



"but he alluded to the mother— the dread- 
ful ghost which is said to haunt Rokesby. 
This is the daughter. When the mother 
died a long time ago, after committing a 
terrible murder, the daughter took her name 
andtrade. She is a very curious person, and 
1 should like you to see her. She is